• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

Washington Pocket Watch Information

LKKaplan

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I am trying to assess the age and value of a closed cover Washington Pocket Watch and was wondering if anyone may have any information on it. It is in a gold-filled case, 18 guage movement, 3/4 plate with 15 jewels, lever set with stem wind, It has very few stampings or markings other than "Franklin" on the inside of the back case along with the case #6139. The procelein dial only has "Washington" and the movement is stamped "Washington" with mvmt # 42270. The movement looks to have had the center wheel was re-jeweled. I've found information on 2 Washington Watch Companies, but no information on anything close to this watch from either one. Not even sure if it's American made. I would appreciate any information at all. Thank you!

Washington Watch.1jpg.jpg Washington Watch.2jpg.jpg Washington Watch.3jpg.jpg Washington Watch.5jpg.jpg Washington Watch4jpg.jpg
 

Jerry Treiman

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This appears to be a Swiss watch of reasonably good quality. The center jewel looks appropriate to the watch. If the watch is not currently in running condition (and needs more than a cleaning and adjustment) it may be more of a challenge since replacement parts may not be available.
 

LKKaplan

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Wow- Thank you! Just for my own information... How do you determine that it's Swiss as opposed to American? The lack of markings? Would you have any idea of the value? It actually came to me for an estate appraisal? I really appreciate your help! The cleint is not interested in having it restored, just needs to get an idea of value to settle the estate. Lisa
P.S. My husband and I are watch restoration graduates of Bowman Technical School (now defunct) in Lancaster and have a watch cleaning machine, watch lathes and bunches of tools. Any idea who may be able to use them?
 

LloydB

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Wow- Thank you! Just for my own information... How do you determine that it's Swiss as opposed to American? The lack of markings? Would you have any idea of the value? It actually came to me for an estate appraisal? I really appreciate your help! The cleint is not interested in having it restored, just needs to get an idea of value to settle the estate. Lisa
P.S. My husband and I are watch restoration graduates of Bowman Technical School (now defunct) in Lancaster and have a watch cleaning machine, watch lathes and bunches of tools. Any idea who may be able to use them?
There's a resemblance to the Longines 21.54
(my avatar is OF, this 'Washington' is hunting).
 

Dr. Jon

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There was a Washington Watch Co who sold private label American watches usually if not always made by the Illinois watch company.

This watch seems to be a Swiss fake, So knowing that there was a Washington watch and there were Swiss fakes the marking "Washington" instead of Washington watch Co, leads to the identification that this is Swiss and there are called Swiss fake,. Some are decent watches, as this seems to be, but they were made to deceive
 

roughbarked

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Often as not, importers would put watches such as Rolex in an unbranded case and dial or indeed put their own name on the dial. So I'm not so sure that all these watches were done to fool over patriotic Americans.
They could buy them from Switzerland and they did. Up to a point in history where things were changed.
The true fakes would be those with Waltham or Elgin etched into the plates.
 
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Rick Hufnagel

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Other than the hairspring stud, which is different on your watch, it's a very close match to an Agassiz labeled movement that I've been checking out. Maybe worth a look into Agassiz.

It's a neat piece. The center jewel looks normal.
 

Jerry Treiman

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How do you determine that it's Swiss as opposed to American?
My opinion was based on a long-time familiarity (over 50 years) with American and Swiss watches, although I could be proven wrong. First, the movement does not look like any American watches with which I am familiar. Secondly, I see several details in the way the watch is finished that look like what I have seen on Swiss watches.There are probably ways when looking closely at, and disassembling, the watch to find more definitive indications. Someone else may be able to specifically identify this movement.

Like Bila and others I do not think this was what have been called "Swiss fakes", i.e. watches intended to fool careless customers into thinking they were getting a watch from one of the better known American manufacturers.
 

agemo

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Hi,
I ask myself a question, there has never been an American counterfeit, made by Americans ? :emoji_thinking:
It is also possible that an American brand had the idea of competing with Illinois.

Amicalement GG
 
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LKKaplan

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You have all been most helpfu! Thank you again.
Any idea what a replacement value would be if you were able to find one?
 

roughbarked

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Les Longines ('long and narrow fields')
It probably can't be older than 1880 or could it? It doesn't appear to be stamped.
from wiki:
Auguste Agassiz moved to the Swiss town of Saint-Imier and set up his own watch firm in 1833 in partnership with Florian Morel and Henri Raiguel. In 1847 Agassiz became the firm's sole owner and in 1852 his nephew Ernest Francillon joined the firm. In 1866 Francillon acquired two plots of land called Les Longines ('long and narrow fields') and he built a factory there, allowing all the staff to be under one roof for the first time. In 1880 he registered the Longines brand and its famous winged hourglass symbol.
 
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