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Warning wheel / pallet alignment

lbrott

Newbie
Jan 2, 2015
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I am reassembling my first mechanism with a rack and snail. Please pardon me if I get the terms incorrect.

I am working on a 1949 Seth Thomas "Staunton 2W" with an A200-006 mechanism. I was able to disassemble, clean, and reassemble the mechanism. The time portion of the mechanism works great, though I am struggling a little with the strike side. Attached is a photo of the gathering pallet just after the mechanism finished striking the top of the hour. You can see the pin on the gathering pallet is in slight contact with the rack. This does not let the rack fall properly on the half hour. I also included a close-up of the gathering pallet, to show that it doesn't have a familiar bean shape. It appears almost symmetrical to me.

Ideally, I'd like to slightly separate the plates and rotate the gathering pallet slightly in relation to the warning wheel. Would that work? Should I rotate the pallet about 45-degrees clockwise? Perhaps 180-degrees? Any suggestions on how the pallet should look at rest would be helpful, and thanks in advance!

Clock.jpg Pallet close up.jpg Pallet.jpg
 

R. Croswell

Registered User
Apr 4, 2006
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You should be able to turn the gathering pallet slightly on its arbor. If you didn't remove it when the movement was apart you may need to remove it first, position it, then press it on until firm. Two paint can openers work nicely as levers to remove / loosen the gathering pallet.

RC
 

Willie X

Registered User
Feb 9, 2008
15,638
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I would say about 30°, just enough so that it clears the rack teeth.

I always re-mesh to get the pin position right but many repairers reposition the GP.

This is a General Time movement, kinda crowded and hard to work on but not a bad clock. Many ran 30+ years without any attention at all.

Willie X
 

lbrott

Newbie
Jan 2, 2015
12
1
3
Country
Thank you! I will separate the plates slightly and rotate the gathering pallet 30-degrees clockwise. I don't trust myself removing press-fit joints.

I am proud of this impulse buy $45 find. In the store I found that the time portion ran perfectly while lifting one side of the case about 1-inch, and at home I discovered that the strike side didn't work due to a blob of wax (?) on one of the gears.
 

shutterbug

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Oct 19, 2005
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Yes! It's MUCH easier to remove and reposition the GP.
 

lbrott

Newbie
Jan 2, 2015
12
1
3
Country
As a final note, I separated the plates about 5 times and changed the relative position of the gears, to no avail. No matter what I did, after an hour strike cycle, the gathering pallet would end up in the original, incorrect, position. Out of frustration, I held the gathering pallet's gear with one hand, and rotated the gathering pallet about 5-degrees counterclockwise. That solved the problem permanently. And yes, the springs were let down the entire time.

The clock is now going through its week long test, and after 24-hours, it has performed flawlessly.

Thanks for everyone's advice!
 

shutterbug

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Usually you can't turn those critters by hand. Be sure it's tight on its arbor. It might have been slipping the whole time and causing you issues.
 

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