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want to learn to repair stripped screws.

ChuckR

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Hey guys
I have run across numerous clocks that BUBBA must have got a hold of before me, and I have found screws stripped, cross threaded or just plain missing. I want to try an start marking or repairing these screws, I was looking in time savers and came across this tap and die set ( Item #: 29406 ) and was was wondering if this set was small enough to do what I need to do. Anyone have any experience with this set or can you point me in the right direction on how to repair threaded holes and repair or make replacement screws. Thanks in advance for any info.
Chuck
 

bangster

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Looks good to me. If you want something a bit smaller, take a look at Ronell's #TL-154.
 

ChuckR

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Thanks Bangster, I like that set and will get it. Another question, is there a book or CD that explains how to make screws from scratch? Thanks.
 

David S

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Well you have lots of options.

You can turn down the stock to the major diameter or per the threading charts, on the lathe and use the dies that you are referencing to make the threads. Or you can get the Sherline threading attachment and single point the threads. I am not familiar with the Sherline. On my lathe I have to use change gears to single point the threads.

David
 

woodlawndon

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Hey Chuck, I'm very green at this and I've seen posts where Jerry Kieffer knocks off some beautiful screws. I just got my lathe this summer and don't have a thread turning attachment yet. I turn down to the outside diameter and then use a die to make the threads, so far so good but not the best. I found a used Bergeon tap and die set, it seems pretty old and has lots of parts. It works well for me now until I can turn properly.
Don
 

Jerry Kieffer

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Hey guys
I have run across numerous clocks that BUBBA must have got a hold of before me, and I have found screws stripped, cross threaded or just plain missing. I want to try an start marking or repairing these screws, I was looking in time savers and came across this tap and die set ( Item #: 29406 ) and was was wondering if this set was small enough to do what I need to do. Anyone have any experience with this set or can you point me in the right direction on how to repair threaded holes and repair or make replacement screws. Thanks in advance for any info.
Chuck
Chuck

Per your request, for better or worse.

When it comes to drills, files, taps and dies and other commonly used tools, anything less than being blunt will not be helpful.

The set you are interested in is listed as made in China.
Tools in general that are made in China and India are somewhere between worthless and useless if the quality of work you are doing is of concern. (Of course my opinion)
I suspect almost everyone on this list will disagree, but when compared side by side with quality tools, the issues are easily clarified.

Quality tools made in Europe and the USA are getting harder to find at common retail outlets but still available if a little extra time is spent looking. In addition, you can google "Machine tool supply houses" where various grades of tools are clearly marked for evaluation.
If by chance you wish to buy Chinese tools, I would suggest Shars Tool Co..

Home page

They are trying to cater to industry and have been forced to also handle a line of higher quality USA made tools but still offer the lesser quality. The lesser quality are off higher quality than those commonly sold at retail outlets even though they are of Chinese manufacture. They are very helpful and knowledgable and can assist you in making a choice to best meet your needs.

In order to determine your needs, you will first need to be able to identify what is needed. I would suggest purchasing both metric and Imperial inch thread gages and purchase Taps and Dies as needed. While a pain at first, you will quickly have what is ultimately needed.

My personal method of thread restoration

Screw Thread Restoration

My personal method of machining screws on the lathe

Basic Lathe Procedures

jerry Kieffer
 
Last edited:

ChuckR

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I've have had my lathe for 5 years and never used it as I had to put my hobby to the side for a few years. Now that I am retired and getting back into it I would like to learn how to use it more. Woodlawndon I agree with you, Jerry can do amazing things with a lathe and make it seem so easy. He is the one who sold me on the Sherline lathe. Thanks guys for the info, I will start by turning down stock rod and then threading it and then look into getting the thread cutter.
Chuck
 

gmorse

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Hi Chuck,

It's most important, as Jerry has hinted at, to establish the pitch and profile of the screws you are looking to restore. Many older clocks and watches didn't use screws made to any sort of standard, and his methods using a lathe are well worth investigating. I know one fine craftsman who makes extensive use of thread chasers in screw restoration, which is how many older screws were originally made.

Regards,

Graham
 

bangster

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Just a comment on Jerry's remark. I've never seen the set the OP is talking about, but I have a couple of T&D sets from good ole Harbor Freight, no doubt Chinese. For me they work just fine. HOWEVER, they don't go down to clock screw sizes. For those, as Jerry says, you might be better off with something more expensive.
 

Bruce Alexander

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David LaBounty has a nice DVD Class on some of the finer points of reproducing original screws.
See this link for more info: Making a Screw
 

ChuckR

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Thanks to all who responded to this thread, I have received a lot of info and need to digest it. I whole heartily agree with what Jerry says, but this is a hobby for me and I do not always have the funds to buy american/European. I will buy the best that I can at the time and go from there, so I have several ways to go to making screws and I will look into each of them and decide how to go. I will keep you informed and again, Thanks.
Chuck
 

shutterbug

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You can order special made taps and dies from Granger too, if you need them.
 

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