Waltham 37 Size 8 Day

BigBobHoss

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I am newer to watch repair. Have completed a few cleaning and timing projects successfully but have slowed down quite a bit with a 3 month old arriving recently and a home addition underway. I managed to get a shopping trip in on vacation this week and picked up a Waltham 8 Day Car Clock. It appears to need main springs which I have sourced and a roller jewel. Was curious if there is an easy way to identify the roller/pin jewel size so I can get that ordered for when I return from Vacation. Hoping to try to keep somewhat fresh and practicing.

image.jpg
 

Skutt50

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Welcome to the forum.

I don't have the measurements but someone else here at ther forum may help out.

In the mean time the easiest way is to hope for some part of the jewel remaining in the roller table which can be removed and measured.
If totally gone, have a look in the movement and the case. On more than one occation have I found missing jewels inside when cleaning the watch.
 
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John Runciman

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unfortunately the best way is to take the pallet fork out and use a roller jewel measurement tool to measure the slot and figure out what size you need. I don't think any of the watch companies typically publish the size of the roller jewel.
 

richiec

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use the roller jewel tool, subtract .002 mm and that is the right size but you also have to figure the length as well
 

Jerry Kieffer

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I am newer to watch repair. Have completed a few cleaning and timing projects successfully but have slowed down quite a bit with a 3 month old arriving recently and a home addition underway. I managed to get a shopping trip in on vacation this week and picked up a Waltham 8 Day Car Clock. It appears to need main springs which I have sourced and a roller jewel. Was curious if there is an easy way to identify the roller/pin jewel size so I can get that ordered for when I return from Vacation. Hoping to try to keep somewhat fresh and practicing.

View attachment 663763
These movements are not that uncommon.

I am surprised that no one so far has one in their spares. I know that I do, but can not put my hand on it at the moment, but I am sure someone will come up with the answer sooner or later.

However, in the future, you may come across situations where no information is available or likely to be available. In these cases, you have no choice but to experiment. As a starting point, you can verify the maximum roller jewel diameter minus clearance using a gage pin set, by measuring the width of the opening in the pallet fork per first attached photo. Gage pin sets are supplied with pins that are specific diameters per the set in the second photo.
If for whatever reason the roller table hole or any hole especially small holes require measurement, Gage pins are often indispensable.

"D" hole sizes if required or desired can be compared to the end of gage pins under optics again as a starting point per third photo.

In this specific case, the pallet fork width in the movement per fourth photo was .021" or .533mm for what its worth.

Jerry Kieffer

fullsizeoutput_898.jpeg DSCN1549.JPG fullsizeoutput_89f.jpeg fullsizeoutput_89e.jpeg
 
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Chris Radek

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In addition to gage pins, you might also consider getting a microscope calibration slide. They are not expensive. They come in several styles with 0.01 mm markings etched on them. Many parts, like your roller, can just sit on or under the slide and be measured pretty well by eyeball with your microscope.
 

BigBobHoss

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I was debating between a pin gauge set and an older vigor roller jewel gauge set. I am going to give it ago with the pin gauges.
 

Chris Radek

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Just for fun: here's a club foot of a small escape wheel sitting on my microscope calibration slide. This would be hard to measure with a micrometer because the next tooth is in the way, but it's easy to see it's 0.23~0.24 mm.


escapetooth.jpg
 

Jerry Kieffer

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I was debating between a pin gauge set and an older vigor roller jewel gauge set. I am going to give it ago with the pin gauges.
I think you will be very pleased with gage pins in that they have a million uses. The one thing I forgot to mention in this specific case, they can also be used to measure the required length of your roller jewel.

Jerry Kieffer
 

John Runciman

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I am surprised that no one so far has one in their spares. I know that I do, but can not put my hand on it at the moment,
unfortunately that's my problem I know I have some movements around here in pieces I just don't remember where they are.

well is an extremely long shot I thought I would look in the Waltham parts book and see if they would tell us which jewel it is surprisingly they do which is not helpful at all. The other thing of interest is there are several types a pallet forks and several types the rollers. Apparently the watches came in both single roller and double roller. Normally that would affect the roller jewel in that the single roller is longer. But you just shove it farther into the table if you didn't want to break it for the double roller.

Then I have another image showing a roller jewel gauge how it's used and why you need to have a little clearance.

wal 37 pal.JPG wal 37 rj.JPG roller-g.JPG
 

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