W5 clock case

Discussion in 'Clock Construction' started by Llamazares-Gil, Feb 14, 2014.

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  1. Llamazares-Gil

    Llamazares-Gil Registered User

    Mar 16, 2012
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    Zaragoza (Spain)
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    Hello. I want to show all the new case I built for my W5.

    _DSC9673_zpsa5c602da.jpg

    It is made with a combination of stained walnut and sycamore wood . For its design and construction has been used lutheria own techniques. It is designed in the same maner as a luthier build a stringed instrument. It consists of 4mm laminated and curved wood side frames and front and rear racks with spigots. This construction results in a very strong while light box.

    _DSC9682_zps11810032.jpg

    In dyeing and varnish process, are also violin maker materials and techniques used. Dyes and coating mixtures are based on natural oils and their application is based on very thin layers with wrist varnishing cotton cloth and one week minimal dryin time between coats.

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    The hinges and latches are own designs, machined from brass and then gold plated.

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    As for aesthetics ( shape and color) , it is a matter of personal preference . In this particular issue , I left a little advice as I recognize that I have more mechanical than artistic talent .

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    drawer for the winding key.
     
  2. doug sinclair

    doug sinclair Registered User

    Aug 27, 2000
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    Calgary, Alberta
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    Indeed a beautiful piece of work. Both the case, and the clock. Talent that I do not possess. Indeed a project to be proud of.
     
  3. tok-tokkie

    tok-tokkie Registered User

    Nov 25, 2010
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    I am particularly interested that you have made a W5. Have you written it up anywhere? Woodward had the seconds shaft going anti-clockwise but you have a conventional seconds dial and hand so, I assume, you have made a slight variation on his design. Lovely workmanship everywhere.
     
  4. burt

    burt Registered User
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    Sep 5, 2008
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    McKees Rocks,Pa.
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    Very impressive case and finishing and I think unique! Master craftsmanship. May I ask what results in accuracy is your clock achieving?
     
  5. caddwg

    caddwg Registered User

    Jul 4, 2012
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    Costa Mesa, Ca
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    #5 caddwg, Feb 15, 2014
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2014
  6. Llamazares-Gil

    Llamazares-Gil Registered User

    Mar 16, 2012
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    Zaragoza (Spain)
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    hello Tok-Tokkie I will try to answer your questions, but as my English is not very good I'm not sure what you're asking to me.
    I do not know the meaning of the phrase "Have you written it up anywhere?".
    On my clock, as well as in the Woodward, the first shaft carries the barrel (it turns anti-clockwise) and the seconds one carries the minute hand and turns, of course colckwise.
    In my clock I have not done any changes respect to the plans and measures that Woodward wrote. The only changes are aesthetic.
    The seconds hand on both clocks is drived by the count wheel and not by the train.
    I hope I have settled your doubts to you.
     
  7. Llamazares-Gil

    Llamazares-Gil Registered User

    Mar 16, 2012
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    Hi Burt. Have a clear idea of ​​the accuracy of a clock is not a simple matter. In this case, I have no long therm records
    since I've been using my clock as a testing bench, and has not been in operation for over one and a half months periods.
    I can tell you that during these periods the clock has remained stable at (+ / -) between 1-1/2 and 2 seconds/month.

    I have done this measures holding with the hand a radio-controlled clock near of the W5 seconds hand, and noting the position at a glance
    To make more precise measurements is necessary to implement electronic circuits and position sensors, which trigger the correct position of the second hand with respect to the radio-controlled time.

    On the other hand, the accuracy of a clock is due to the clock itself and its environment.
    The wall on which is hanging is crucial (eg if your neighbors made ​​brickwork for two months and consistently use a hammer drill). If temperature changes are very abrupt, the master pendulum compensator work not roperly ......

    Speak of accuracy in terms of seconds / year is very delicate because a year has a lot of seconds and many things can happen,
    but I am convinced that with a stable support (wall reinforced concrete type) as well as slightly temperature controlled environment, this clock can maintain an accuracy of (+ / -) 12 to 30 seconds / year. To lower this figure we should invoke the "luck factor".
    But I repeat that the later is a personal estimation that I could not check still.
     
  8. burt

    burt Registered User
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    Sep 5, 2008
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    McKees Rocks,Pa.
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    Hello!
    Thank you for taking the time to answer my question. If we could only control those uncontrollable variables! I'm impressed with your results as they are within, in my opinion, excellent rate for a mechanical clock in a home environment. In my own experience I realized that the design of a timepiece is only one of many factors which influence accuracy in a clock. If you don't mind my stating I think I found a way to help insulate the clock case from some wall vibration and temperature. My regulator is also attached to and is hanging on a exterior wall. I selected this location for several reasons. Being mindful of direct sun and interior heating and cooling vents was important. My clock hangs on a single screw support. As my wall was very straight and perpendicular to the floor it didn't require the use of wall leveling screws. What I did was to affix inch square and 1/2 inch tall "cork" pieces, to the rear case corners, to help insulate vibration from the wall to the clock and also to allow room temperature air circulation around the back of the case. This I think helps along with the temperature compensation feature built into the regulator. In any event I must say again what a really fantastic clock/case you built and my hat is certainly off to it's maker!

    burt
     
  9. Llamazares-Gil

    Llamazares-Gil Registered User

    Mar 16, 2012
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    Hi Burt. Thanks for the advice to use pieces of cork to insulate the clock on the wall. I already had tried with disastrous results.
    The W5 has two pendulums of considerable weight and a wide angle of oscillation. In the repeated oscillation cycle of 30 seconds,
    sometimes two pendulums oscillate in counter-phase but sometimes both pendulums oscillate in the same lateral direction.
    I tried to attach it to the wall with "silent-block" system. Even with a high hardness elastomer, there was appreciated (even by eye) that
    the whole case "slightly pulsed", and that, as we say, "the cure is worse than the disease".
    So my w5 is "glued" to the wall with four bolts (two M-6 above and two M-4 below).
    when I say that the wall in my living room is not the best for hanging a regulator, in fact think that no wall of a conventional house
    is suitable to hang any regulator. Shortt clocks were extremely accurate clocks and indeed much ink has been spent on articles
    explaining its marvels (with all reason). But little has been written about the "room" where they were placed. A temperature-controlled room,
    isolated from the outside world and with restricted entry to very few people. Nor has written extensively on the monolith
    (I can not remember how many tons) of concrete where the clock was anchored.
    I am convinced that if Shortt clocks had been hanging on the wall of my living room, its accuracy had not been legendary in any way.
     
  10. Raynerd

    Raynerd Registered User

    Apr 11, 2004
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    Wow, that is really fantastic!!

    I have built a gearless clock and would live to know how you created the dial ring - what is the material and how did you get the faint markings? In it Perspex and transfers?
     
  11. Llamazares-Gil

    Llamazares-Gil Registered User

    Mar 16, 2012
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    Hello Raynerd. I hope to answering your questions since my English is not very fine.

    The dial is made of glass (minimum of 5 mm thick) and is cut with a "CNC high pressure water jet machine" (I not know how is his English name). There are companies that are dedicated to cutt with these machines, you just have to bring the contour CAD file.

    The numbers are made in the same manner as if it were an enamelled dial. For this matter you have two options, one short and one long. The long one is starting from a CAD drawing file of the numbers and divisions, make a photolyte (It is a very dark copy in a very clear plastic)and with it, make a frame for serigraphy. With this frame make a transfer.
    The short way is starting from the same CAD file, find a store that have a special printer to make serigraphy transfers directly.

    A transfer consists of three layers, a non-stick base cardboard ( like photo-paper for printers), the picture layer with enamel special ink and a thin transfer film that burns and disappears in the enameling furnacing process.

    My advice is that once you have the transfer, contact with a specialist in enamel issues, they are usually in arts schools or similar. Although the process is not difficult, it requires practice and equipment (I did it so).

    Finally, before deciding the Dial outer diameter, you must ask what is the maximum width of the enamel furnace door. I should repeat the work and make smaller the dial (or buy a bigger furnace).

    Saludos desde España.
     

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