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W. HAID clock won't run

komputodo

New User
Aug 30, 2014
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I was recently given a mantle clock that doesn't run. The movement is stamped 74 W.HAID two(2) jewels made in west germany unadjusted 1050-020

It has 3 key holes..the middle key I believe is for the time..The mainspring on the middle key seemed broken..I disassembled it and removed the barrel and found a broken tab on the barrel that holds the end of the spring. I repaired that problem and reinstalled the spring into the barrel and assembled the movement. I wound it up but there is no action..The little disc on top (is that called the balance wheel?) does not move. It can be moved by hand and it springs back. The movement is very clean and I can see no damage at all.

The barrel has a ring gear mounted to it which engages a much smaller gear on the same shaft which hold the hands but not fastened to it. It appears to slip over that shaft. The minute hand can be moved by hand and there seems to be the correct friction when doing so. When I try to spin the small gear that engages the barrel ring gear, it does not move. This is what I think is causing the clock not to run but I'm probably mistaken.

Basically I'm stumped..Any help will be appreciated.
 

Rob P.

Registered User
Dec 19, 2011
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We would need some pics of the case/dial and the movement to best respond to your problem(s).
 

Randy Beckett

NAWCC Member
May 23, 2012
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Although other problems may be present, the coil spring on your balance appears to be mangled, so a new replacement balance assembly is needed. Since the movement was made by Hermle in 1974, and there is what appears to be black residue around some of the pivots, it is well past it's expected life. A new replacement movement may be your best option, since this model would have plated pivots, which historically do not rebuild well.
 

Willie X

Registered User
Feb 9, 2008
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I agree with RB. Probably best to cut and run on that one. You can spend the time and make that one work, and also learn a lot about clocks in the long process. But, the short story is that your clock will stop again in a year or two, and you're back to square one.

That's just what modern clocks do. They run great for around 20 years, 25 if you're lucky, and then they crap out with no practical way for a cost effective repair. Have to bite the bullet and replace the movement. https://mb.nawcc.org/images/smilies/icon_sad.gif

Willie X
 

Rob P.

Registered User
Dec 19, 2011
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In addition to the mangled hairspring, worn out pivots, and general overall gunkyness; your pic #6 tells it all.

Hairsprings can be straightened. Movements can be cleaned. Butterbearings can often give new life to plated pivots. While all of that costs a good bit, it can be done. However, NOTHING can be done for those chewed up gears short of replacement.

Past time for a new movement I'd say.
 

Tinker Dwight

Registered User
Oct 11, 2010
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When a spring breaks at the center arbor, is
often damages the pinion or bends the arbor
of the next gear. It also often bends one of the
gears on the barrel as well.
It was noted above that the barrel of the strike
looks to be in sad shape.
It is still a good clock to explore and learn on.
As was mentioned, this would have the plated
pivots as well. Replacing pivots requires a lathe
and an additional level of skill beyond just
fiddling. If you want to continue with this movement
to learn on, there are often similar movement
on ebay that one can use as parts.
Tinker Dwight
 

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