• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

VR Brevet France info

greymouser

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Nov 1, 2013
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I have had this clock since I inherited it as a child, about 70 years ago. Just had it cleaned and serviced by clockmaker.
I would now be interested in how old it is, and who the maker was, and what the type clock it is. The case is marble, and I have the original pendulum and key. It keeps excellent time.
Pictures included.
Thank you 1.JPG 1.JPG 2.JPG 3.JPG IMG_2975.JPG
 

new2clocks

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Apr 25, 2005
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The trademark on the movement is that of Victor Reclus of Paris, Circa 1862 (mikrolisk).

Mikrolisk does not state whether Reclus was a movement maker or case maker or finisher - any of which is possible.

Brevete is akin to patented.

Regards.
 

greymouser

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Nov 1, 2013
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The trademark on the movement is that of Victor Reclus of Paris, Circa 1862 (mikrolisk).

Mikrolisk does not state whether Reclus was a movement maker or case maker or finisher - any of which is possible.

Brevete is akin to patented.

Regards.
Thank you for the response. Very helpful.
I have decided to begin downsizing my collections, made over the past 50 years, including clocks. Would you guide me to a venue where I could sell the clocks in my collection, preferably to someone who would appreciate them? I would like to sell them one at a time, in order to enjoy them as long as possible.
Thanks again, Greymouser
 

zedric

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If you are looking for info on Reculs, the following is a google translation (slightly adapted) of the information found at Victor Reclus, inventeur et homme de cœur - Polmorésie, blog d’histoire

Pierre Victor Reclus was born on September 30, 1831 in Bergerac (Dordogne). He was the son of Marie Venencie and Antoine Tonin Reclus, cutler.

He lived in Paris where his daughter Henriette Clarisse Amélie was born when he was only 15 years old(!) He married her mother, Virginie Louise Leroy, nine years later in February 1856 in Paris (6th arr.).

That same year, 1856, Victor Reclus opened a clock shop rue Dauphine in Paris (6th arr.), He filed his first invention patent in March "for a kind of meter for cars". He will try to exploit this patent, intended for four-wheeled carriage for public hire of “Petites-Voitures de Paris“, but without great success it seems.

He moved his workshop to rue des Lavandieres-Sainte-Opportune (1st district) in 1858 and then to rue du Temple, 14 (4th arr.) In 1860, Reclus files many other patents in various fields: in February 1857, for an aerial telegraphy system; in August, 1858, for an alarm clock, etc.

The factory of Reclus is, after that of Japy, one of the most consistent in Paris and employs several tens of employees. Reclus products are the subject of technical presentations, sometimes by themselves, in professional journals. He also sits on the board of the Chambre Syndicale de l'Horlogerie several times.

In 1867 Reclus is listed alongside industry names such as Jacot, Drocourt, Leroy, Charpentier and Desfontaines in the Pendules De Voyage section “Mémoires de la Société d'Emulation du Doubs”

In September 1869, Reclus joined the workers of his factory who organized a petition "for the families of the victims of the miners of the Loire", In June, 14 the striking miners died when the troupe fired on families trying to prevent the arrest of the strikers.

If he remains domiciled in Paris, like many people with a certain ease, he has acquired a second home in the suburbs. He settled near the banks of the Marne in the newly created district of Palissy in Joinville-le-Pont (Seine, Val-de-Marne). He is a member of the Charity Office of this municipality in 1868.

In January 1869, a decree appointed Pierre Victor Reclus as city councilor of Joinville to replace Jean-Louis Ancelet, deceased, in the municipality led by Auguste Courtin. He is elected in the same office during the first municipal elections following the establishment of the Third Republic, which take place on 25 and 28 September 1870. Auguste Courtin, curator, remains mayor. Reclus no longer sits in the assembly elected in July 1871. The commune was strongly affected by the Franco-Prussian war, which had caused the evacuation of the population, the destruction of the bridge between the two shores, the death of more than 2000 soldiers on the ground between Joinville and Champigny then the occupation during six months by the German troops.

Reclus will maintain a link with the town, where his nephew, Georges Reclus, settled in the early 20th century as a butcher in the same district of Palissy. Perhaps it is Victor Reclus who participates, in September 1894 and as secretary at the general meeting of a consumer cooperative, La Populaire, chaired by the journalist Henry Vaudémont. It is also possible that he is the Reclus who participates, with 260 other subscribers, still in his neighborhood, a subscription "for the hungry Carmaux", in favor of strikers glassware, launched by the companion of Vaudémont, Victoria Bes, and a Radical-Socialist activist, Pierre Jules Tireau

Under the Third Republic, Victor Reclus continues the development of its activity, investing in particular in the electrical field, patenting an electric pendulum. He created a brand (a Sun, V.R.) that he affixed to his horological models and another to barometers (R surrounded by a diamond).

Attentive to put forward his workers, he intervenes several times to receive medals. He supports since 1874, the foundation of the watchmaking school of Paris. Reclus participated in the two world exhibitions in Paris in 1878 and 1889. At the first, he won two silver medals; he is rewarded with a gold medal in the second.

In 1890, the electrical clock of the V. Reclus house was installed in the new Commercial Museum of the Paris Stock Exchange. In 1896, his electric clocks were presented at the exhibition of the International Society of Electricians.

In 1897, Victor Reclus was listed as a member of the admissions committee of the 1900 Universal Exhibition in Paris for class 25 (electric lighting).

He continued his work of inventor, with in 1887 a patent for a clock with electric winding, with electric distribution of time and ringing; then in 1899 for a table with light projections and color variations operating by monetary trigger, and the same year, another for a table with images and mobile advertisements.

If he had left it as a teenager, Reclus retained an attachment to his native Dordogne. His wife died in September 1884 in the town of Prigonrieux, near Bergerac, where he acquired a castle in the hamlet of Nébouts. He settled there around 1905 and continued there, at least a time his watchmaking activity.

He is reported as still residing there in 1920, when he was 89 years old. However, he no longer lives there in 1926. The date of his death is not known.

....

His horloogical patents are listed as

21 août 1858.—Reclus (Paris).—Brevet de 15 ans,—d’addition les 27 novembre 1858 et 11 août 1859.

Système de réveille-matin de poche, donnant l’heure après avoir sonné. C'est le réveil connu de tous les horlogers, un peu modifié.

17 octobre 1866.-—Reclus.—Échappement libre à balancier circulaire.

11juin 1869.— Reclus.— Disposition de sonnerie à répétition d’heures et de quarts pour pendules, horloges et tous genres d’horlogerie.
 
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jmclaugh

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Jun 1, 2006
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You've had that one a long time. It's a nice French marble clock, it looks like it has incised patterns to the corners and the base which would I think have been gilded. Typically these clocks have a silk covering on the back door to keep dust out. Date wise it is probably last quarter 19th C or a bit earlier.
 

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