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Andy Newcomer

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Aug 17, 2020
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I have a choice of a few clocks. Which clock would you get? Pictures should be in order. Lol
1. William S. Johnson 4 column clock
2. Hills Goodrich & company Hollow column clock.
3. Birge Fuller triple decker
4. Seth Thomas 8 day
5. Welch ogee
6. William S. Johnson ogee WW


0068AC9B-DC4E-4F22-A121-2D6F59E36DBD.jpeg 59C28735-A4DF-4F8D-B1F3-D9FEA0E7F84F.jpeg C28F7ECB-4EE6-44FF-9B96-B77947A7EAF3.jpeg 799C6817-2407-4385-8864-D0C6113298BF.jpeg C955B4FB-DCC8-4960-84A8-31EB1AD1E5D0.jpeg 1218DB33-3570-4D19-91DB-95402A1A78CB.jpeg
 

Schatznut

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I'd buy whichever one is busted because I like fixing clocks. But that's just me...
 

lpbp

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If it's actually a hollow column, that one, if not the triple decker.
 

Steven Thornberry

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How about the Johnson WW OG?

William S. Johnson played an important role in NYC clock making. He was in business from 1841 to 1861 and worked at various addresses, often on Cortlandt Street. He was by and large a retailer of Connecticut clocks, but apparently he also assembled cases and movements. He was not himself a manufacturer. Chauncey Boardman was his major supplier, perhaps only supplier. In the late 1840's the Connecticut Protective Clock Co., a combine of several Connecticut makers, approached Johnson to persuade him to fix his prices. Johnson refused, and in retaliation, the CPCC forced Chauncey Boardman out of business in 1850. Thereafter, Johnson had to source movements from other manufacturers.

Possibly a bit of history there. Of course, we need to see the movement.
 
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Andy Newcomer

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How about the Johnson WW OG?

William S. Johnson played an important role in NYC clock making. He was in business from 1841 to 1861 and worked at various addresses, often on Cortlandt Street. He was by and large a retailer of Connecticut clocks, but apparently he also assembled cases and movements. He was not himself a manufacturer. Chauncey Boardman was his major supplier, perhaps only supplier. In the late 1840's the Connecticut Protective Clock Co., a combine of several Connecticut makers, approached Johnson to persuade him to fix his prices. Johnson refused, and in retaliation, the CPCC forced Chauncey Boardman out of business in 1850. Thereafter, Johnson had to source movements from other manufacturers.

Possibly a bit of history there. Of course, we need to see the movement.
Awesome information thank you.
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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It’s an actual hollow column clock and my first pick so far.
Some reasonable choices.

About all have varying degrees of issues with their condition. Amongst the considerations, then, are which of the condition issues are the least bothersome to you or most remediable.

Personally, I like the hollow column. Those don't turn up every day. Unfortunately, the middle tablet now has a printed picture in place and the case has some "veneereal" disease.

The one I like least is the "triple decker." It has a bad Victorian replacement crest and a bad replacement glass, flaking dial, wrong hands.

RM
 

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