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Video Microscope for late

jptrue

Registered User
Apr 29, 2005
8
0
0
I searched the archives, but I could not find any information on video microscopes for lathes.
I am trying to make a plug for a cylinder escapement for a very small ladies lapel watch.
It is going ok, but it is killing my eyes.
Does anyone have any experience using a computer or video microscope to cut and polish pivots?

Thanks,
Jeff
 

jptrue

Registered User
Apr 29, 2005
8
0
0
I searched the archives, but I could not find any information on video microscopes for lathes.
I am trying to make a plug for a cylinder escapement for a very small ladies lapel watch.
It is going ok, but it is killing my eyes.
Does anyone have any experience using a computer or video microscope to cut and polish pivots?

Thanks,
Jeff
 

Bob W

Registered User
Mar 20, 2005
121
0
0
I haven't seen one recently, but some time ago there was someone making a USB microscope that would hook up to a computer. I am not sure what the minimum magnification would be however. It could be that it would have to be too close to your work. I just use a magnifying visor for everything anymore.

Bob
 

Robert Gary

NAWCC Member
Feb 26, 2003
3,954
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48
Southern California
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Jeff:

I have sent you a PM on this topic. Keep an eye out for it.

RobertG
 

Richard Hatch

NAWCC Member
Oct 19, 2005
57
0
0
Where I work we have tried video inspection systems and found that the resolution isn’t as good as with a good stereomicroscope. We like the Olympus SZ4540. The magnification with 10x eyepieces is from 6.3X-40X and the image is both bright and high contrast. Also if you should decide to go with video later on, Olympus makes a camera adaptor that “bolts” up to the microscope. Be sure to get a bright illuminator! The working distance is ~5”, which gives room for tools below the microscope. Richard
 

frankb

Registered User
Feb 21, 2005
137
0
0
Jeff- I don't do lathe work nor watch repairs but here is another suggestion for magnifying your work area.

Use a video camera on a tripod connected to a TV monitor. You may not get the precise clarity as from a microscope but it may help.

Also, about 5 years ago one of the toy manufacturers (or Hewlett-Packard??) made a toy microscope that could be connected to a computer. Retail cost then was about $100.00. They may still be available.

Let us know what you wind up with.

Frank
 

harold

Registered User
Mar 12, 2001
752
5
18
Look on eBay there are many microscopes for sale. Look under Intel Microscope.
 
E

Emma

just looked into this and bought a video microscope through an ebay company. I guess there are many people like me who cant aford a fancy binocular stereomicroscope for the shop. mine is just a standard microscope, and comes with a camera. the camera was shipped sepperately, and has a few different adapter sleeves with it, so guessing they sell the camera and software seperately. I'm more than pleased with my scope, Maybe it's chinese? no idea.
usual disclamer, but I found this company very good to deal with. the link below is my scope, follow the leads to the ebay store.

http://cgi.ebay.com.au/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&catego...8741&item=7570036525


the problem with a ofdinary single lense scope is that everything apears to move backward, but I have got used to this already, didnt take as much as I thought it might.

anyone who wants a screan capture from this camera/scope can email me at ritson_m@hotmail.com
hope this helps
 

bchaps

Registered User
Dec 16, 2001
1,130
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Mountain Top, PA
www.clockguru.com
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Hi Jeff... I purchased my first stereo microscope nearly five years ago as I began clock and watch repair. At Christmas this year, I purchased a high end boom scope. Before Christmas I turned a small stud to replace a broken minute wheel shaft on a 16s pocket watch. I use it to check watch jewels also. Since most of my work is clock repairs, it's used to inspect and polish pivots or turning the pivots down. The lower magnifications are normally used for clock repairs, but the higher mags are great for watches. Since I now have three stereo scopes, two are not being used. If interested, contact me offline and I'll send pictures and specs. You can see my scope setup just a few threads down at the link below. Thanks, Bill



old ref::http://nawcc-mb.infopop.cc/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/9486087461/m/9461044791
email: billchappell@clockguru.com
 

DC Kelley

Registered User
Mar 16, 2006
271
4
16
Jeff:
These days there are several makers of USB cameras set up to be plugged into std (30mm) eye piece. One with a 1200x1000 resolution will run you ~250 bucks. But here is the catch. The working field of view for the camera is likely to be different than for your scope eye piece, as well as the focal length. So you end up tweaking the image about to grab the picture you want. Even in a stereo setup with a 3rd tube (a trinocular) this exists and can annoying. The best bet is to try it first.


Update:
I notice that J Wild now sells the inspection mono-scope ready mounted for a MyFord lathe, shown in his book on wheel cutting, see "parts" in http://www.j-m-w.co.uk/

I ended up with a 3-tube scope on a boom that I pickup for from "Precision World" on ebay and use for inspection work. This one came equipped with a simple USB camera and SW that is serving my needs fine.
 

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