Veering off the usual path.

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

NAWCC Member
Nov 26, 2009
5,911
1,257
113
Country
I typically seek 19th century clocks. Every so often, I surprise myself by acquiring something of more recent manufacture. This has resulted in some interesting additions, eg, 2 examples of Charles Alvah Smith's unique wooden works wall clocks (including a striker).

This most recent find is the type of clock I thought I would never buy. It's a Herschede Westminster 1/4 hour striker. It is in untouched condition. It has it's original finish, undamaged veneer and case except the little pull on the back door is gone, good silvering on the engraved dial (albeit some losses to the black wax inlay in the numerals, but it looks okay), original hands, etc. And, quite frankly, under the money. A clock striking the hour of 40 in the presence of the seller during negotiation of the price is a great bargaining tool.

Fortunately, the fix for the errant strike was a very minor adjustment. When I removed the dial to make the adjustment, I was pleasantly surprised at the quality of the movement and other components. We once knew how to build stuff. Based upon the serial # on the movement, I dated it to 1921 (of course in typical fashion, I don't recall what it was and forgot to record it).

It's a grandma's house clock. Sounds wonderful when it strikes, like what people expect an old clock to sound like. Not what I usually collect. But it's sometimes fun to veer off the usual path when the opportunity presents itself.

RM
 

Attachments

harold bain

NAWCC Member
Deceased
Nov 4, 2002
40,853
179
63
73
Whitby, Ontario, Canada
Country
Region
Nice find RM. I have two Westminster Herschede mantel clocks, and both have top quality sound, and great movements.
I've never seen one like yours. Is it a pendulum clock or platform escapement?
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

NAWCC Member
Nov 26, 2009
5,911
1,257
113
Country
Thanks! It's a pendulum clock. Neat way they suspend the pendulum with that little slide on piece.

RM
 

Dave B

Banned
Jun 7, 2008
2,389
6
0
Westminster. MD
Country
Like you, I got this clock, not because I wanted to own a clock with a Hermle movement, but because the price was right. The dial was a mess - a couple of the numerals were missing, and two coner spandrels were gone. So I sprng for a moon dial, and the extra cog to drive it. The upper side panels were gone, so I cut a couple of pieces of glass to put in the holes. This is one of those cases where the movement comes out the top,so mounting glass in the side panels didn't make it any different to remove from the case. I was going to sell it, but it is the only chiming clock in the house, and I have kinda gotten used to having it around, so may decide to keep it. Now, if I find a Seth Thomas Sonora for super cheap, the Pearl is gonna have to go. :)
 

Attachments

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

NAWCC Member
Nov 26, 2009
5,911
1,257
113
Country
My earlier statement about seeking 19th century clocks aside, if I found an intact straight 8 bell Sonora under the money, I would veer off the usual path for that one too. Yeah, not holding my breath.

I often forget that clocks, like the handsome hall clock you posted, have the potential of being more than just visually appealling. I run only a few clocks regularly, so most of mine are poised like silent sentinels at attention in a permanent formation. What clocks like yours and the Herschede remind me is that they can also sound appealing. A nice solid "tic-toc" with a little performance every 1/4 hour.

But I'm getting a bit carried away...

RM
 

124Spider

NAWCC Member
Jan 4, 2009
501
30
28
Pacific Northwest, USA
www.de-regt.com
Region
I often forget that clocks, like the handsome hall clock you posted, have the potential of being more than just visually appealling. I run only a few clocks regularly, so most of mine are poised like silent sentinels at attention in a permanent formation. What clocks like yours and the Herschede remind me is that they can also sound appealing. A nice solid "tic-toc" with a little performance every 1/4 hour.

But I'm getting a bit carried away...
Not at all; a very large part of the charm, and an important criterion for my collecting, is the very pretty noises clocks can make. I keep all my clocks wound and running; 14 of them chime and/or strike, but I have been careful to have very little duplication of sounds, so there's this lovely array of bells and gongs going off every 15 minutes; guests don't lose track of time when invited to dinner, as conversation becomes somewhat more difficult on the top of each hour. :D
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

NAWCC Member
Nov 26, 2009
5,911
1,257
113
Country
Re: clocks and guests. I occasionally get some additional clocks running when guests come over. Most are charmed by what is now an unusual sound in an age of silent electrics. A few are annoyed, especially when they strike. One once commented to the effect of oh great, when I come to your home, I can hear how my life is just ticking away.

RM
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

NAWCC Member
Nov 26, 2009
5,911
1,257
113
Country
I do find it interesting to veer off the usual path once in a while.

I typically seek CT clocks from the 1st 1/2 of the 19th century. However, sometimes I will venture from that.

Recently I found another Herchede mantel clock I couldn't resist. The price seemed right, but honestly, I don't have a really good sense of the market for clocks like this.

I believe it to be from the 1920's. It has survived in pretty amazing original condition.

311165.jpg

The case is the "tambour" style. Obviously a cherished item. It has survived in wonderful condition with original finish. Nope. No need to refinish nor to add LED's.

I like the engraved silvered dial with raised brass #'s.

More views of the case:

311166.jpg 311167.jpg

The movement is of wonderful quality.

311168.jpg

Note the original pendulum bob.

Here's the key:

311175.jpg

It is a model 10 movement which based upon my research appears to be something a bit special and considered higher quality. One can select Westminster or Canterbury chimes (I have it set on the latter). It strikes the 1/4 hours and then the hour. It truly sounds absolutely wonderful!!

The clock came with a book published by the ACWM, "Herschede: A Selection From 4 Cataloges, c. 1904-1927" which discusses this special movement.

From the same "pick" and apparently the same estate came this Chelsea "marine" clock":

311170.jpg

It has a serial # which I need to look up to "date". It's hard to tell from the picture, but the case retains most of the original nickel plating. Alas, in today's market, that's a liability as most want the shiny brass case. Nope. I won't buff it off.

And yes, now for the superfluous.

Most Victorian furniture is seen as staid and boring.

Au contraire mon frère, some of it was pretty wild.

Previously, I posted a Hunzinger "lollipop" rocker that belied that stereotype.

Well, the Gods of Picking continue to be kind (though after seeing the pix I'm about to post, one may say they continue to play some cruel jokes).

The Merklen Brothers were NYC furniture makers active from about 1875 to about 1897.

They made some pretty wild furniture known for it's spiral turnings which may be open or closed:

311172.jpg 311173.jpg

They also employed brass paw feet clutching a WOODEN ball rather that glass and the use of gadrooned edges, amongst other characteristics.

Well, recently at a flea market, I found a table which based upon rather extensive careful research I am quite comfortable attributing to the Merklen Brothers:

311174.jpg

That open spiral is NOT easy to turn. I have found other examples that are virtually identical to very similar. I have found other examples of Merklen Brothers Furniture that share components used in this table.

I know, it looks like something from the set of the old Addam's Family TV show. Something that "Thing's" box might have sat upon.

What can I say. I like the off the beaten path.

RM.
 

Attachments

Last edited:

chimeclockfan

NAWCC Member
Dec 21, 2006
4,619
485
83
WI
Country
Region
The Herschede Model 10 is very nice. I find they're very heavy-duty and well made overall in regards to just about everything. They do require maintenance to keep going in full but the same can be said for any chime clock... I should get one of mine running again.
The chime melodies tend to sound gorgeous on those 'Symphony Rods', and are easily worth the price alone. They were always more expensive than their German-built counterparts back in the day, which would be anywhere between 1926-1933.

I see it is on a toilet. o:)
 

George Nelson

NAWCC Member
Deceased
Oct 5, 2007
931
13
18
Tennessee
Country
Region
RM, the table is wonderful! If I ever see one like it for sale, it will come home with me for sure! Thanks for posting!

All the best,

George
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

NAWCC Member
Nov 26, 2009
5,911
1,257
113
Country
The Herschede Model 10 is very nice. I find they're very heavy-duty and well made overall in regards to just about everything. They do require maintenance to keep going in full but the same can be said for any chime clock... I should get one of mine running again.
The chime melodies tend to sound gorgeous on those 'Symphony Rods', and are easily worth the price alone. They were always more expensive than their German-built counterparts back in the day, which would be anywhere between 1926-1933.

I see it is on a toilet. o:)
Thanks for your interest.

Yes, I sometimes use the upstairs bathroom as a place to take photographs. It provides for a light colored uncluttered background in a well lit space. I just need to remember to flush first.

RM, the table is wonderful! If I ever see one like it for sale, it will come home with me for sure! Thanks for posting!

All the best,

George
Thanks for you kind comment.

No accounting for taste :rolleyes:?

RM
 

Forum statistics

Threads
167,209
Messages
1,457,099
Members
87,372
Latest member
Pamula
Encyclopedia Pages
1,057
Total wiki contributions
2,914
Last edit
E. Howard & Co. by Clint Geller