varying frequency striking tempo question

whcureton

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Oct 27, 2010
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Hello (again) fellow clock lovers ...

Thanks to all who contributed to my "wobbly pendulum" solution. A combination of suggestions corrected the problem.

Today, I have a question about the uneven or varying frequency of the strinking timing or tempo on the same clock ... an typical Ansonia.

When it strikes it speeds up and strikes steady for a while then slows down, sometimes almost to a crawl, and strikes more slowly (longer duration, that is, between beats). What I am trying to accomplish is a steady pace between strikes ...

I am not sure what the cause of this is but I am beginning to suspect a fatigued spring. I have spent hours observing the strike train from various angles and I can see no visible problems with worn parts. The spring and proper components have been well cleaned and lubricated. Any suggestions? Sometimes is drags down so slow that the whole strike movement stops ... the clock keeps running steady, however.

Somewhere, in another thread I read about different strengths for strike and drive train springs. I'm not sure what this means because I don't understand how to determine spring strength when I order a replacement. I just go my size, width and wind diameter. Is this true? Do strike and drive train springs have different ... ummmm ... what's the proper term? Coil strength? The reason I ask is because if you all concur that I might have a fatigued strike spring I'm wondering how to order the correct strength ... as I said ... all I have to go on is physical dimensions.

Thank you all!

- Bill in northern California
 

shutterbug

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American clocks are notorious for their over-powered movements. Your problem, while it could be a weak spring, is more likely a power problem created from worn pivot holes and/or bad pivots. Could also just be dirt caked in the pivot holes. Have you had the movement apart? Any bushing work done?
 

Uhralt

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shutterbug;516224 said:
American clocks are notorious for their over-powered movements. Your problem, while it could be a weak spring, is more likely a power problem created from worn pivot holes and/or bad pivots. Could also just be dirt caked in the pivot holes. Have you had the movement apart? Any bushing work done?
Or, do your hear noises coming from the spring (like clunking or slapping) while the clock strikes? This would mean that the mainspring is gummed up releasing it's force uneven. In this case the spring needs to be cleaned and lubricated. The fact that the clock sometimes strikes fast speaks against a weak spring as a cause.

Uhralt
 

whcureton

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Oct 27, 2010
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Hi Shutter and Uralt

Yes ... I took it apart and thoroughly cleaned it. I am going to take another look at those pivots though, now that you mention it. The spring itself was in very good condition ... very clean and I lubricated it with the proper grease after cleaning. Looks like the movement was cleaned in the not too distant past in England where the clock came from. The cabinet, alas, was covered in what I take to be coal soot from sitting on the owners mantel piece above the fire.

Thanks for your tips. I'll take it apart again (sigh).

- Bill in northern California
 

R&A

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Can you get some pictures to us . It would help in looking at the movement and giving a better evaluation. And perhaps a solution that doesn't have a more guessing approach. Dirt and springs and wear cause allot of problems.

H/C
 

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