vacheron question

Discussion in 'European & Other Pocket Watches' started by Luca, Dec 13, 2007.

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  1. Luca

    Luca Registered User

    Jan 19, 2004
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    I have a pocket watch that says 'Vacheron & Ce Geneve" and it has a serial no. of 1082 under the dial. Does this watch have a relationship to the later Vacheron & Constantin? BTW, it doesn't say Cie but Ce - not sure if there's any difference. It's a high grade KW watch. In my research I haven't found the name laid out exactly like this.

    Luca
     
  2. CZHACK

    CZHACK Registered User

    Apr 28, 2005
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    Luca,

    I have not seen that form of identification for VC and it is not listed in Pritchard. How about a look at the watch?

    Mike
     
  3. Dr. Jon

    Dr. Jon Moderator
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    Dec 14, 2001
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    The abbreviation "Ce is not encouraging. It is usually abbreviated Cie. Be sure if you post photos show how the dial is secured to the movement.
     
  4. Luca

    Luca Registered User

    Jan 19, 2004
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    It's a chronometer.

    69.jpg

    70.jpg

    71.jpg
     
  5. Dr. Jon

    Dr. Jon Moderator
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    It is not set up- like any Vacheron I have seen but it is one sweet item, pivoted detent escapement. I have seen the Vacheron & "Cie" (But on another suspicious watch) but not &Ce but there was a Cesar Vacheron. The dial attachment is not typical Vacheron buthen again neither is the ebauche. The serial number is also too low.

    Its a very tough call. It may be another Vacheron, that is another family or a relative.
     
  6. Luca

    Luca Registered User

    Jan 19, 2004
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    I thought it might be difficult to determine the pedigree despite the 'Vacheron' on the mvt as I hadn't seen it written that way either. It's a terrific mvt regardless. I'll keep hunting for references and hope I get lucky. It does run well and has a decent dial too so certainly a keeper. Thanks for the responses.

    Luca
     
  7. Tom McIntyre

    Tom McIntyre Technical Admin
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    Aug 24, 2000
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    This is the sort of watch it would be tempting to regild. It appears to have 19 jewels with the center unjeweled. I am guessing that both the unlocking and impulse are jeweled on the balance.

    Nice watch. :thumb:
     
  8. Luca

    Luca Registered User

    Jan 19, 2004
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    Yes, I think you're right Tom. First movement of this kind I've ever had. I love how the escape wheel seem to really tear along. I've looked at diagrams and explanantions of this detent mechanism but am still trying to get my head around it and why it is so accurate.

    Luca
     
  9. Tom McIntyre

    Tom McIntyre Technical Admin
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    The advantage of the detent is that it is more highly detached than the lever. It impulses on every other beat as compared to a lever and the angle of engagement is much smaller. This means that the balance is more nearly free than in the lever. Since errors arise in the train, the more the train affects the balance the less accurate the watch (all other things being equal).

    Remontoir's can also be very accurate by the mechanism of regulating the force of the train using an isolated impulse system with its own power that is resupplied by the main train. When a remotoir is applied directly to the impulse of the balance, the angle of engagement is generally rather large but the force of the impulse is maintained constant. Mudge's chronometers are the best known example of the constant force escapement.
     
  10. Luca

    Luca Registered User

    Jan 19, 2004
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    Thanks Tom, that info definitely aids my understanding. I'll have to read up on some of these other more unusual escapements.

    Luca
     

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