Useful scribing

Salsagev

Registered User
Feb 6, 2020
1,371
161
63
14
Madison
www.youtube.com
Country
Region
I think scribing T/S on mainsprings and great wheels is more use than harm. I never seem to memorize the direction of the wheels and sometimes pictures don't work out. Of course, this is not acceptable on expensive clocks but what harm can it do to a crude T/S clock? It is also such a minute detail that only persnickety people will pay attention to. I think it would be useful to future clock repairers as well.
 

shutterbug

Moderator
Staff member
NAWCC Member
Oct 19, 2005
46,693
1,911
113
North Carolina
Country
Region
After you get a few under your belt you will learn which way they go on by sight. Most cheaper clocks use the same spring for both sides. I do keep mine separated, but I don't like to add marks to clocks. You could make a tiny mark on the annealed end of a single spring that only you would see and recognize as a mark. You would only need to mark one spring.
 

R. Croswell

Registered User
Apr 4, 2006
11,043
1,149
113
Trappe, Md.
www.greenfieldclockshop.com
Country
Region
Just because you can doesn't mean that you should. Learn to work without leaving your marks on cheap clocks and it will come naturally when you are asked to work on a clock where it does matter. I keep a spool of # 22 gage insulate electrical hookup wire on the bench. I tie a piece through the hole in the time side main spring and around a spoke of any time side wheel that could easily be confused with a strike side part. For chime clocks I keep each train's parts in a separate container. In the ultrasonic, all the parts for a train can be wired together. I always take a picture immediately after separating the plates so I can easily see which side of each wheel goes 'up'. If you don't rely on marking parts you will soon develop the skill to recognize which parts go where. OK to mark parts with a felt tip pen that can be easily removed with acetone during testing if needed.

RC
 
  • Like
Reactions: DennyI

Willie X

Registered User
Feb 9, 2008
14,049
1,494
113
Sal's, et all,

You only have to make one mark, even on a chime clock. A neat "T" is easiest to make. Keep the mark small and in a specific place, like always on the spoke with the click on American clocks. Always near the hook on a barrel. Always near the rivet on an open spring, or the hole on a barreled spring.

I have also finally learned my lesson to permanently mark the fly and the wheel that drives the fly on all chime clocks. Again, just one or the other, no need to mark but one train and a "C" is easier to make for me.

I know some don't like marks (but IMO) I'm just doing what the factory should have done when the clocks were made.
This can save you a lot of grief! :)

Willie X
 

Salsagev

Registered User
Feb 6, 2020
1,371
161
63
14
Madison
www.youtube.com
Country
Region
You could make a tiny mark on the annealed end of a single spring that only you would see and recognize as a mark. You would only need to mark one spring.
There was one instance where the New Haven clock did not use the same springs for some reason and only found out after reassembly. Most clocks I come across already have the marking. Chime clock (some) have a distinctively different barrel.
 

lpbp

NAWCC Star Fellow
NAWCC Life Member
NAWCC Member
Aug 25, 2000
2,977
62
48
Country
Region
I never permanently mark anything, use metal tags attached with wire or large clips, you can make nice ones out of heavy wire, I use the ends I have cut off of the end of new suspension spring rods.
 

John P

NAWCC Member
Sep 17, 2010
1,101
99
48
73
North Carolina
Country
Region
WITNESS MARKS as i prefer to call them are used to save time and frustration when assembling complex machinery.
Even with good pictures you can miss something. Mainwheels, springs, 2nd wheels, fans and stop wheels are easily mixed up.

I use them only when needed . The more clocks you work on, the less you need them.

Nothing wrong with leaving a trail if its done properly.
 

Forum statistics

Threads
166,141
Messages
1,447,319
Members
86,684
Latest member
ds23pallas
Encyclopedia Pages
1,101
Total wiki contributions
2,883
Last edit
E. Howard & Co. by Clint Geller