Useful Hints and Tricks (open thread)

bangster

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Re: Useful Hints and Tricks

Quickie test stand.

quick test stand 2.jpg

Assembly legs and a couple of weights.

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bangster

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Useful Hints and Tricks

I'm posting this mainly for the benefit of folks newbier-than-me.

I've seen various procedures described for getting at the full length of a mainspring, for cleaning, inspecting, and lubing. Some of them call for stretching it out full length. The method I use is the simplest and easiest I know of. It involves little stretching, and no special setup. I didn't invent it, and don't recall where I learned it...probably from somebody on this MB. I imagine a lot of people use it.

ms clean - end.jpg mainspring 1.jpg mainspring 2.jpg

With the spring unwound, I hook it over the handle of my Joe Collins winder (free plug for JOE, who makes the best 'uns around)...between the coils, not through the center. From there, simply walk up it a few inches at a time, letting it coil back up below, until I get to the center, then releasing it a few inches at a time so's it can coil back up normally. I don't try to mess with those last few tight coils in the center, which don't do anything anyway. But I do check for cracks or tears in the arbor-hook hole or nearby.

Pulling it through, I scrub it down full length with steel wool dipped in mineral spirits, removing rust and crud and inspecting for cracks and problem areas. I wipe it down full length with a rag as I let it coil back up. Then I take a rag charged with mainspring lube, and lube it all the way up, and back again. All done.

Barring problems, it takes under five minutes to service a mainspring...and you never have to walk away from your spring winder.

bangster


Since writing this, I've switched from ms lube on a rag to Slick-50 1-Lube, applied with fingers. No other changes.
3/30/14
 
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Scottie-TX

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Re: Useful Hints and Tricks

I took the liberty of copying FLYN's great hint over here from "TOOLS".
Thot it was a great ideer. Thanks also to BONG for a GREAT addition!
 
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bkerr

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Re: Useful Hints and Tricks

Excellent!

Just last week I "tuned up a pair" with one of those diamond files. The blue one is really fine and will do a great job. I've also thought about using 800 grit paper with a good backer?
 

Scottie-TX

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Re: Useful Hints and Tricks

The challenge here was to drill two, 3/8" holes obliquely thru these wooden cubes. They are regulating weights for a foliot arm. My solution was to make a fixture that would snugly fit the cubes. The hole was located off center of thickness to accomodate the cubes, thinner than the 2 X 4 used for the fixture.
 

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bangster

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Re: Useful Hints and Tricks

Looks easy...if you have a square Forstner bit. :D
 

Scottie-TX

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For lack of a foresters bit, bandsaw to th' rescue. If you don't have one - they're not expensive and I've come to enjoy and use this nearly as offen as a dremmul tule. Once set up properly - table perfectly at a right angle to the blade, guides and rollers tweaked to the nth - I scribed the cube onto the 2 X 4 with a sharp knife to get the most accurate template and drilled a hole at three corners to give the blade a turning space for it's next route.
Since I foresee the need of more of these cubes, I made four.
Obviously I can't cut four PERFECT squares. Obviously, NONE of the four was identical. I used a selective system of drilling. First, I drilled the ONLY one that would enter the hole with some resistance. Then I continued with the other three, dressing the opening to fit the remaining. The last one I downsized on the beltsander to fit the hole.
As for the long hole thru the 2 X 4 laterally, I began it with a standard length bit on the drillpress. Then I completed that hole with a hand drill and a ten inch long bit. Pine is soft so the longest path to the subject hole would result in the least amount of wobble on approach and repeated passes.
 
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hoo-boy

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Useful Hints and Tricks

There has been some good info about tweezers lately . This is not exactly tweezers but I use hemostats in my clockwork as well as flytying, gunsmith work, etc. but find that the locking mechainism is sometimes a pain, locking when you don't need it too. On one I cut this off with a dremel and smoothed it back up and found that this works very well when ya need a heavy pair of tweezers. I made 2 pair one with smooth jaws(ground smooth) the other as is. find I reach for them quite frequently ....hoo-boy
 

bkerr

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Re: Useful Hints and Tricks

I am working on a mantel clock that I changed the movement on.

Just thought of it, I should get pics for the hall of shame, I'll do that tonight. :rolleyes:

Back on topic,
So I put the newer movement in the case only to have the winding arbors not lined up?

Here is the question, do you guys have a trick for centering the arbors to the dial? I thought about making a tapered sleeve (two of each) that be used as centers?

For some reason I remember someone talking about wire nuts (maybe I'm nuts):eek:
 

shutterbug

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Re: Useful Hints and Tricks

I am working on a mantel clock that I changed the movement on.

Just thought of it, I should get pics for the hall of shame, I'll do that tonight. :rolleyes:

Back on topic,
So I put the newer movement in the case only to have the winding arbors not lined up?

Here is the question, do you guys have a trick for centering the arbors to the dial? I thought about making a tapered sleeve (two of each) that be used as centers?

For some reason I remember someone talking about wire nuts (maybe I'm nuts):eek:
Timesavers has something for that purpose. They're white plastic. Not sure what they're called.
 

LaBounty

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Re: Useful Hints and Tricks

Installing an identical replacement movement for a modern German movement can be quite difficult without the "winding arbor locators" Shutt refers to. (Timesavers Part No. 23153, pg. 68, catalog no. 35) These hard plastic locators slip over the wind arbor or center shaft and help keep everything aligned while the movement feet are manipulated to line up with the original screw holes.

They turn a 20 minute job into a 2 minute job.
 

bkerr

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Re: Useful Hints and Tricks

Dave / Bug,

Thanks, I'll have some on order this week. I already have twenty minutes in this part of the job. Thanks for the Hint / Trick:D
 

bangster

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Re: Useful Hints and Tricks

Installing an identical replacement movement for a modern German movement can be quite difficult without the "winding arbor locators" Shutt refers to. (Timesavers Part No. 23153, pg. 68, catalog no. 35) These hard plastic locators slip over the wind arbor or center shaft and help keep everything aligned while the movement feet are manipulated to line up with the original screw holes.

They turn a 20 minute job into a 2 minute job.
OK, I can see how the gadgets work for a front-mounted movement. What's your alignment procedure for a back-mounted movement? (Just had that problem a while back.)

bangster
 

LaBounty

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Re: Useful Hints and Tricks

Back-mounted modern German movements, like those found on some wall clocks, are a bit more difficult but the winding arbor locators can still be used.

-With the power let down, loosen the movement feet slightly so they can be adjusted with a bit of force.
-Slip the movement over the studs in the back board or secure to the case with screws.
-Loosely lay the dial over the movement and install the locators.
-Shift the dial and movement together until the dial is in the proper place. This will shift the position of the movement feet.
-Put a finger on the center shaft to hold the movement in place and remove the dial and locators.
-Carefully remove the movement and tighten the nuts being sure that their positions don't change. It is sometimes advantageous to do one at a time, repeating the whole "locator" process until all four feet are tight.
 

harold bain

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Re: Useful Hints and Tricks

:thumb:Finding chain size for cuckoos and other chain drive clocks.
This was posted by John Farnan (a fellow chapter 33 member) on the Blackforest Yahoo group page and I thought our members might find it useful:
"The points on the sprocket are the important thing. If you cut a piece of paper in a strip that will fit inside the sprocket, and then gently press it in, the sprocket points will mark the paper. Then you can go to the page in Timesavers that has the chain patterns photocopied, and compare the sprocket points to the center of the chain links on the pattern. This should give you an accurate selection of chain."
Thanks, John
 

Willie X

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Re: Useful Hints and Tricks

Hi List,

Hope this tip isn't already covered but here goes.

If you do a lot of modern clock repair, it has been very helpful to me to collect front and back plates from several of the common movements. Strip them clean of rivets, post, etc. Carefully and precisely enlarge the front plate holes to 7/16" diameter. Then loosely wire the pair together and mark the pair with bold markings for identification.

When you need to re-hole a (new or old) dial to fit a modern movement these plates make the job much easier. Just use the back plate (little holes) if you want to mark centers, and the front plates (7/16" holes) for reference in finishing the key holes.

There is no doubt about things lining up as the template you are using is the actual movement plates.

Willie X
 

Scottie-TX

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Re: Useful Hints and Tricks

Gauges I've made. Gauges come in a myriad of types and are very useful for quickly ascertaining a value of sort. Here's two I've made - a simple thread gauge making it easy to quickly identify a thread in question - nut or bolt. I made another for metric. The other is a drill bit size gauge nos. 1 to 60 - handy when you may be seeking a "go"/"no-go" reference.
 

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Scottie-TX

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Re: Useful Hints and Tricks

You may have noticed recently that there are now two, "Useful" threads running: One here for everyone and the sticky atop the page - a condensed version containing only the "meat" with no chit chat. As hints are brought here, we can transfer them there where there's no clutter so easier to find what you seek!
 

Kevin W.

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Re: Useful Hints and Tricks

Here is a handy item to check some of the threads we encounter.Price is not too bad either.
 
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shutterbug

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Re: Useful Hints and Tricks

You may have noticed recently that there are now two, "Useful" threads running: One here for everyone and the sticky atop the page - a condensed version containing only the "meat" with no chit chat. As hints are brought here, we can transfer them there where there's no clutter so easier to find what you seek!
That's perfect, Scottie. Great idea!
 

Mike Phelan

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Re: Useful Hints and Tricks

Here is a handy item to check some of the threads we encounter.Price is not too bad either.


http://www.leevalley.com/hardware/page.aspx?c=1&p=64800&cat=3,41306
Price seems very reasonable, Kevin. For a minute until I saw the $$ I thought it was our Lee Valley (NE of London)!

That said, I've never had too much of a problem identifying threads; the mationality and age will usually spill the beans, or as a last resort, I can use my thread gauges.
-> posts merged by system <-
You may have noticed recently that there are now two, "Useful" threads running: One here for everyone and the sticky atop the page - a condensed version containing only the "meat" with no chit chat. As hints are brought here, we can transfer them there where there's no clutter so easier to find what you seek!
Good idea, Scottie. We do similar on a forum I moderate, but lock and archive the thread after a few months, clearing out the dross and making it readable.
As this will eventually grow and grow, would it be worth having a sub-section for different topics, say:
  • Striking and chiming
  • Escapements
  • Cleaning
  • Lubrication
  • Going train
  • Cases
Yeah - it would make a lot of work! :eek:
 

bangster

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Re: Useful Hints and Tricks

I thought I'd re-post this simple little gadget. It's a movement holder for French roulant movements ...grasps the movement by the bottom pillar. Also works for alarm clocks.
Roulant holder 1.jpg Roulant holder 2.jpg
The prototype, posted here several years ago (wish I could remember who dunnit), was made of block aluminum. I didn't have any, so I used oak. Seems to work just as well.

bangster
 

Thyme

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Re: Useful Hints and Tricks

Gauges I've made. Gauges come in a myriad of types and are very useful for quickly ascertaining a value of sort. Here's two I've made - a simple thread gauge making it easy to quickly identify a thread in question - nut or bolt. I made another for metric. The other is a drill bit size gauge nos. 1 to 60 - handy when you may be seeking a "go"/"no-go" reference.
In wood? No, thanks - too easy for your homemade wooden gauge to become rounded out to an inaccurate size, especially with the very fine drill bits. Easier to simply buy a metal drill bit sizing stand and store your bits in it. IMHO, it's essential for precision work.
 

Dave B

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Easier to simply buy a metal drill bit sizing stand and store your bits in it. IMHO, it's essential for precision work.
Or one of these. The big advantage to this particular plate is it is hardened.I buy American machine screws by the gross in 1" lengths. That way, I can simply runthe length of screw I need though the plate, shear the excess length off with a cold chisel, and back the screw out, thus cleaning up the last thread, and it is good to ready to install. No messing about withclamping the screw in something, sawing it off and filing the end, all of which eats up time. And there is no need to stock a gzillion different lengths of screws of each size. So I just have six bins for each size screw: round head, flat head and cheese head, in brass and stainless. And buying them in bulk is a heck of a sight cheaper than buying in little shrink packs of anywhere from four to a dozen.
 

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Dave B

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Re: Useful Hints and Tricks

Here is another super-handy tool when you get the movement back together and discover the durned strike wheel with the locking pin is a tooth or two out of sync. As we all know, sometimes it can be an excercise in frustration to spread the plates enough to disengage and turn that wheel, without losing a whole slew of pivots all down the line. With these pliers, you can remove the nut on the corner pillar nearest the wheel, and loosen a couple of others. Then it is just a matter of spreading the plates and relocating the one wheel (and usually the fly, because its pivot falls out of the upper plate, and it flops around.) I originally bought these when I was doing automotive engine building. They are designed for spreading piston rings, and are available from nearly all the automotive parts houses. With the long handles, you have lots of control over how far you spread the plates.

Incidentally, I at one time had the serations ground off the jaws, and discovered they have a tendency to slip. So I restored the checkering and now I just put a matchbook cover between the jaws and the plates to keep from marring things. I know most of you guys don't own a checkering file; that is the advantage of having worked as a gunsmith for a few years.:)
 

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Thyme

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Re: Useful Hints and Tricks

Or one of these. The big advantage to this particular plate is it is hardened.I buy American machine screws by the gross in 1" lengths. That way, I can simply runthe length of screw I need though the plate, shear the excess length off with a cold chisel, and back the screw out, thus cleaning up the last thread, and it is good to ready to install. No messing about withclamping the screw in something, sawing it off and filing the end, all of which eats up time. And there is no need to stock a gzillion different lengths of screws of each size. So I just have six bins for each size screw: round head, flat head and cheese head, in brass and stainless. And buying them in bulk is a heck of a sight cheaper than buying in little shrink packs of anywhere from four to a dozen.
But this won't help in sizing the drill bits. :)

The only thing that will (accurately) is having a drill bit stand. Even so, you need to remember to put the #59 drill bit back in the stand before taking the #58 bit out. If you get them mixed up, you'll probably need to get out your micrometer. :0:

I don't think I've ever bought a machine screw in my life. I've got a bajillion screws and nuts that I've salvaged from various junked machines over decades. (Of course, it took me many hours to sort them all into bins in drawers, according to thread size and head type. But when I need a certain type screw, being able to find one quickly and easily pays off.)
 

hoo-boy

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Re: Useful Hints and Tricks

Incidentally, I know most of you guys don't own a checkering file; that is the advantage of having worked as a gunsmith for a few years.:)
Yea verily, thou saith pearls of wisdom!:D

( by the way these are lock ring pliers that once was sold by Craftsman and others, Have a set But not seen them for sale in ages)
 

Willie X

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Dave,

I hope those weren't vintage Snap-On ring pliers ...

Willie X
 

Dave B

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How vintage is vintage? I bought two pair from the Snap-On man back in the seventies. (I only bought the second pair, because, unbeknownst to me, one of the other guys in the shop had "borrowed" my first pair, and I thought sure I had left them in someone's car, and thjey were long gone. About a week after I bought the second pair, I found mine, tossed on the floor under his workbench. He hadn't even bothered to grind off my initials from them! We had a few words about that, and I started locking my tool box at lunch time. :mad:

Almost forgot to add, for Thyme - I have similiar plates with number drill holes from 0-80, and a fractional one from 1/64 to 1/4 by 64ths, and a metric one by .1mm graduations from .1 to 3mm, and .5mm from there on up to 10mm graduations. I just grabbed the one plate, as a sample. I also have a metric thread plate, but it only runs from 2mm to 8mm, coarse and fine thread. ONe of these days, I'm gonna invest in one for the little guys, but they don't come cheaply.

I have a gazillion screws, courtesy of Westinghouse's policy of selling floor sweepings to employees at about a penny a pound. Both my father and my grandfather bought fifty pounds of them, and after they both died, I inherited the bins.) But they are nearly all 4-40, 6-32, and 8-32, with an occasional 2-56 and 0-80 mixed in. Also, they are nearly all round head stainless, because the military likes to use stainless steel in it's specs. So, a couple of years ago, I ordered about $100.00 in other sizes from Mil-Spec Fasteners, to fill in the gaps. I also have a bunch of larger stuff that lives out in the garage, that I salvaged out of various odd and sundry vehicles I have owned over the years. There is a bunch of Whitworth stuff mixed in that lot.
 
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Gary Walker

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Here is another super-handy tool when you get the movement back together and discover the durned strike wheel with the locking pin is a tooth or two out of sync. As we all know, sometimes it can be an excercise in frustration to spread the plates enough to disengage and turn that wheel, without losing a whole slew of pivots all down the line. With these pliers, you can remove the nut on the corner pillar nearest the wheel, and loosen a couple of others. Then it is just a matter of spreading the plates and relocating the one wheel (and usually the fly, because its pivot falls out of the upper plate, and it flops around.) I originally bought these when I was doing automotive engine building. They are designed for spreading piston rings, and are available from nearly all the automotive parts houses. With the long handles, you have lots of control over how far you spread the plates.
:)
For Newbies like me, be very careful when using the spread method. I'm sure I'm not the only one that has done this; if you have to remove a gear, be sure that the pivot is clear of the hole before removing the gear.
I learned the hard way by bending the pivot and then breaking if off when trying to straighten it.
 

bangster

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Re: Useful Hints and Tricks

Here is another super-handy tool when you get the movement back together and discover the durned strike wheel with the locking pin is a tooth or two out of sync. As we all know, sometimes it can be an excercise in frustration to spread the plates enough to disengage and turn that wheel, without losing a whole slew of pivots all down the line. With these pliers, you can remove the nut on the corner pillar nearest the wheel, and loosen a couple of others. Then it is just a matter of spreading the plates and relocating the one wheel (and usually the fly, because its pivot falls out of the upper plate, and it flops around.) I originally bought these when I was doing automotive engine building. They are designed for spreading piston rings, and are available from nearly all the automotive parts houses. With the long handles, you have lots of control over how far you spread the plates.
...:)
Thanks for the post, Dave! Pic reminded me that I used to own a pair of those. Looked in a toolbox I hadn't used for decades, and there they were, right on top next to the brakeshoe pliers & stuff. Been wishing for a cheap way to spread plates a bit, and this is it. :thumb:

bangster
 

Kevin W.

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Re: Useful Hints and Tricks

Some pivots can take more bending than others.American made 8 day clocks are forgiving, while German made are not.
Lessons are quickly learned.:eek:
 

shutterbug

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Re: Useful Hints and Tricks

Timesavers has a little plate spreader that I like. #20401. Pricey, but it's also handy for checking your straightened pivot for true straightness :)
 

Dave B

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Some pivots can take more bending than others.American made 8 day clocks are forgiving, while German made are not.
Lessons are quickly learned.:eek:
Yes, and don't be trying to spread the plates on a French roulet, either!
 

Scottie-TX

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I'm clumsy. I've spilled far more oil than properly used so I made a spilpruf bottle holder by cutting a hole in a smal, squat box.
 

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bangster

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I'm clumsy. I've spilled far more oil than properly used so I made a spilpruf bottle holder by cutting a hole in a smal, squat box.
Yep. Here's mine. Notice high-tech oil cup (crown cap epoxied to a metal scrap) and cover (from a milk jug).

oil block.jpg

bangster
 

hoo-boy

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I see a lot of self made letdown tools described. I have not seen the one I made. Take a spindle adjustable type tap holder cut off the t-handle (or just remove) and fit it to a appropiate size screwdriver handle, secure by pinning it. Now you have an adjustable letdown tool that will fit most winding arbors. Need a larger or smaller one? These tap holders come in all sizes!... hoo-boy
 

bangster

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My dear wife showed me the purpose of those notches in the WD-40 cap. Am I the only person in the world who didn't know about this?

bangster

wd40 cap copy.jpg

wd40 cap copy.jpg
 
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Kevin W.

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Bang that,s news to me too.:p
 

bkerr

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Bang, are you the guy who sprayed the WD-40 on the last clock I worked on?
Now you can pin point your target area!:D

Just havin fun!! BTW I did know that but it sure seems like a worthless concept. Must be the ownes kid that came up with that one!
 

bangster

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I don't think so. Keeps the straw and the can together, and saves having to hunt for a rubber band.
 

Willie X

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Bang,

Is that whiskey or mobil-1 in that keystone bottle?

Willie X
 

wow

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Speaking of WD-40, I know it is a NO-NO on clock movements, but how do you use it in your shop? Here is a copy of an e-mail I received with interesting facts about WD-40:


>
>
> Some useful info on wd 40
>
> .
>
> > Before you read to the end, does anybody know what
> the main ingredient of WD-40 is?
> >
> > Don't lie and don't cheat. WD-40. Who knew? I
> had a neighbor who had bought a new pickup. I got up very
> early one Sunday morning and saw that someone had spray
> painted red all around the sides of this beige truck (for
> some unknown reason). I went over, woke him up, and told him
> the bad news. He was very upset and was trying to figure out
> what to do probably nothing until Monday morning, since
> nothing was open. Another neighbor came out and told him to
> get his WD-40 and clean it off. It removed the unwanted
> paint beautifully and did not harm his paint job that was on
> the truck. I'm impressed!
> >
> > WD-40 who knew? 'Water Displacement #40' The
> product began from a search for a rust preventative solvent
> and degreaser to protect missile parts. WD-40 was created in
> 1953 by three technicians at the San Diego Rocket Chemical
> Company. Its name comes from the project that was to find a
> 'water displacement' compound.. They were successful
> with the fortieth formulation, thus WD-40. The Convair
> Company bought it in bulk to protect their atlas missile
> parts.
> >
> > Ken East (one of the original founders) says there is
> nothing in WD-40 that would hurt you.. When you read the
> 'shower door' part, try it. It's the first thing
> that has ever cleaned that spotty shower door. If yours is
> plastic, it works just as well as glass. It's a miracle!
> Then try it on your stove top ... Viola! It's now
> shinier than it's ever been. You'll be amazed.
> >
> > Here are some other uses:
> >
> > 1. Protects silver from tarnishing.
> > 2. Removes road tar and grime from cars.
> > 3. Cleans and lubricates guitar strings.
> > 4. Gives floors that 'just-waxed' sheen
> without making them slippery.
> > 5. Keeps flies off cows.
> > 6. Restores and cleans chalkboards.
> > 7. Removes lipstick stains.
> > 8. Loosens stubborn zippers.
> > 9. Untangles jewelry chains..
> > 10. Removes stains from stainless steel sinks.
> > 11. Removes dirt and grime from the barbecue grill.
> > 12. Keeps ceramic/terra cotta garden pots from
> oxidizing.
> > 13. Removes tomato stains from clothing.
> > 14. Keeps glass shower doors free of water spots.
> > 15. Camouflages scratches in ceramic and marble
> floors.
> > 16. Keeps scissors working smoothly.
> > 17. Lubricates noisy door hinges on vehicles and doors
> in homes.
> > 18. It removes black scuff marks from the kitchen
> floor! Use WD-40 for those nasty tar and scuff marks on
> flooring. It doesn't seem to harm the finish and you
> won't have to scrub nearly as hard to get them off. Just
> remember to open some windows if you have a lot of marks.
> > 19. Bug guts will eat away the finish on your car if
> not removed quickly! Use WD-40!
> > 20. Gives a children's playground gym slide a
> shine for a super fast slide.
> > 21. Lubricates gear shift and mower deck lever for
> ease of handling on riding mowers.
> > 22. Rids kids rocking chairs and swings of squeaky
> noises.
> > 23. Lubricates tracks in sticking home windows and
> makes them easier to open.
> > 24. Spraying an umbrella stem makes it easier to open
> and close.
> > 25. Restores and cleans padded leather dashboards in
> vehicles, as well as vinyl bumpers.
> > 26. Restores and cleans roof racks on vehicles.
> > 27. Lubricates and stops squeaks in electric fans
> > 28. Lubricates wheel sprockets on tricycles, wagons,
> and bicycles for easy handling.
> > 29. Lubricates fan belts on washers and dryers and
> keeps them running smoothly.
> > 30.. Keeps rust from forming on saws and saw blades,
> and other tools.
> > 31. Removes splattered grease on stove.
> > 32. Keeps bathroom mirror from fogging.
> > 33. Lubricates prosthetic limbs.
> > 34. Keeps pigeons off the balcony (they hate the
> smell).
> > 35. Removes all traces of duct tape.
> > 36. Folks even spray it on their arms, hands, and
> knees to relieve arthritis pain.
> > 37. Florida 's favorite use is: 'cleans and
> removes love bugs from grills and bumpers.'
> > 38. The favorite use in the state of New York , WD-40
> protects the Statue of Liberty from the elements.
> > 39. WD-40 attracts fish. Spray a little on live bait
> or lures and you will be catching the big one in no time.
> Also, it's a lot cheaper than the chemical attractants
> that are made for just that purpose. Keep in mind though,
> using some chemical laced baits or lures for fishing are not
> allowed in some states.
> > 40. Use it for fire ant bites. It takes the sting away
> immediately and stops the itch..
> > 41. WD-40 is great for removing crayon from walls.
> Spray on the mark and wipe with a clean rag.
> > 42. Also, if you've discovered that your teenage
> daughter has washed and dried a tube of lipstick with a load
> of laundry, saturate the lipstick spots with WD-40 and
> rewash. Presto! The lipstick is gone!
> > 43. If you sprayed WD-40 on the distributor cap, it
> would displace the moisture and allow the car to start.
> >
> > P. S. The basic ingredient is FISH OIL.
>
>
>
>
 
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