Useful Hints and Tricks •

Discussion in 'Hints & How-to's' started by bkerr, Nov 11, 2009.

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  1. Tony10Clocks

    Tony10Clocks Registered User
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    Aug 10, 2010
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    Re: Handy hint

    Excellent idea.......... I could try that whilst eating my biccies...... :D
     
  2. Patch

    Patch Registered User

    May 11, 2010
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    Re: Handy hint

    Hobbyist chiming in: I paint houses for a living. I have a 4'x12' drop cloth, that I cut in half, and I lay the the 2 halves side by side, to make it 8'x6'. It works well for those parts, that either grow wings, or feet, and try to make a fast break. With the canvas being white, it makers finding them, very easy.
     
  3. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    Re: Handy hint

    Agreeing with PATCH, only change I would make is - if available - white paper to make the hunt a bit easier.
     
  4. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    #54 bangster, Jul 26, 2011
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2011
    Re: Bangster's Bright Idea

    USEFUL HINTS & TRICKS INDEX

    FOR LOCKED THREAD THROUGH POST #53
    AND ONGOING THREAD (LINK) THROUGH POST 252
    (NUMBERS WITH LETTER “b”.)


    Adhesive
    mixing epoxy 48b
    Alignment
    winding arbor alignment 20,21,31,32,77b
    Animal hair
    uses for 50b,51b,52b,53b
    Arbor
    winding arbor alignment 20,21,31,32,77b
    Bottles
    pill bottles 1,2; spice bottles 191b
    Bushing
    bushing aid 5; making bushings 212b
    Chain
    determining chain size 33
    Containers
    pill bottles 1,2; spice bottles 191b; 14b,15b
    Cuckoo
    testing rack for cuckoos 167b,172b,173b
    Dial
    re-holing a dial 35
    Dremel
    opening hand hole 206b; uses 218b,219b
    Drill, Drilling
    drill oblique holes 29; drill press 27b,28b,29b,32b; sizing drill bits 131
    Epoxy
    mixing epoxy 48b
    Escapement
    escapement analyzer 232b
    Furniture
    typing table workbench 4; tensor lamp stand 6
    Gauge
    gauges 36; feeler gauge 38b
    Hand
    opening hand hole 206b
    Hermle
    Hermle winding tool 23
    Holder
    tensor lamp stand 6; test stand 26; oil bottle holder 40,41; movement holder 7; roulant holder 37
    Lathe
    lathe cover 4; tools from cut nails 17; tapping with lathe 27b; lathe hints 35b,38b; center finder 239b; testing lathe center 13
    Letdown
    letdown aid 24; letdown tool 25,48,92b;222b
    Lighting
    tensor lamp stand 6
    Lubricants
    oil bottle holder 40,41; oil dippers 47; WD-40 144b,149b
    Mainspring
    measuring mainspring 28; servicing mainspring 28
    Materials
    cut nails 17; bicycle spokes 188b; styrofoam 16; geneva stop retainers 252b; shim stock 38
    Movement
    movement holder 7; roulant holder 37
    Pendulum
    pendulum slip joint 22; pendulum stick repair 151b,152b; temporary pendulum 250b
    Photography
    pictures with loupe 244b,248b
    Pivot
    polishing pivots 243b; door hinge pivot polisher 42
    Plate
    plate supporter 12; plate spreading tool 39
    Procedures
    make a thin washer 3; measure mainspring length 28; service mainspring 28; re-holing a dial 35; the shotgun approach 46; tapping 28b,29b,32b; crushing shellac 177b,183b; gathering pallet removal 199b; opening hand hole 206b; making bushings 212; polishing pivots 243b; drill oblique holes 29; striking clock tutorial 45
    Regulation
    fine-tuning regulation 157b,160b; discussion of regulating 165b
    Screw
    screw sizing plate, screw shortening aid 38; dropped screw catcher 49,52; nut & bolt sizer 124b;
    Shellac
    crushing shellac 177b
    Shim stock
    shim stock 38
    Soldering
    soldering aid 9,10,18,19
    Stand
    tensor lamp stand 6; test stand 26
    Tapping
    tapping with drill press or lathe 28b,29b,32b
    Tools
    clamp 8; pickup tools 14; magnetized screwdriver 15; styrofoam circle cutter 16; tools from cut nails 17; Hermle winding tool 23; tweezers from hemostat 30; gauges 36; plate spreading tool 39; door hinge pivot polisher 42; pullers 43; razorblade radio 67b; nut & bolt sizer 124b; Dremel 218b, 219b;
    Tweezers
    about tweezers 27; tweezers from hemostat 30
    Ultrasonic
    ultasonic hints 44
    Washer
    make a thin washer 3; tension washer 12
    Winding
    winding arbor alignment 20,21,31,32,77b; Hermle winding tool 23
     
  5. bkerr

    bkerr Registered User
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    I was surprized to see the thread closed. If you can remember back years ago in Popular Mechanics there was always a how to, shortcut or as I like to refer to as hints and tricks. I was in the shop last night finishing up a cuckoo that has been a pain for way too long and thought that I should post a couple of items.

    Here you go. The first one is a wire (1/16 stainless tig wire) with a bend on each end. When working on a cuckoo it is really handy to attach the weights to the wires rather than opening up the chain links and attaching the weights to the hooks. Simply one hook goes on the chain and the other on the weight. I also use this for fishing the chain through the case.

    The next two are the same concepts just two diferent materials. If you ever have to transport a GF or any other clock with chime rods it may drive you crazy before you get back to the shop. These "cards" side on to the rods keeping them in place. This also lessens the chance of a bend or broken rod while in transport. I keep a credit card / room key in my wallet and the others go in my tool bag.

    For what it is worth!:)
     

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  6. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    Feb 12, 2011
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    Useful Hints and Tricks Sticky (index at post #54)

    Hi Everyone,

    I figured this might be the best place to post this

    I am re-working the drive for a small mill & am using a turnbuckle for the belt tension adjustment. It is heavily galvanized & I needed to cut the threads larger in a 3/8-16 nut for a locknut. If I cleaned up the shaft threads with a die to use a standard nut, the shaft would have been very sloppy in the turnbuckle.

    Sooooooo, time for an old timey trick I learned from my dad 40+ years ago.

    First I tried tapping through a rag which often works:

    [​IMG]

    This time it didn’t enlarge the threads enough so time to be more aggressive. This shim is .010 inch thick:

    [​IMG]

    Here is how it looked after a few turns:

    [​IMG]

    Finished:

    [​IMG]

    Originally the nut wouldn’t even go on past the end chamfer - less than one turn.

    I’ve probably only needed this trick 5 or 6 times since first seeing it, but it sure has saved the day each of those times.
     
  7. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    Re: Useful Hints and Tricks Sticky (index at post #54)

    sequence
     
  8. dad1891

    dad1891 Registered User

    Feb 28, 2014
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    Hopefully this will save someone some aggravation in the future:

    A while back I got a clock with a Hermle 1051 that had been run for a couple of years and put back in the box to age. I took it apart, inspected it, cleaned and reassembled. The clock ran fine, but the timekeeping was very erratic. I took it back apart and inspected everything and didn't find any problems. Put it back together and it was better, but still erratic. It would run great for a week, then I would wind it and it would start losing 30 seconds a day. I would wind it the next week and it would start gaining 15 seconds a day, the next week it would gain 2 minutes a day, etc. Long story short, on the 4th disassembly, just before I threw the damn thing in the trash, I noticed that there was absolutely no chamfer on the T3R pivot hole. The handshaft appeared to be square cut without any radius, but I didn't know what else to do, so I put about 1/64" chamfer on that pivot hole. It runs like a different clock. Best timekeeper I have. I am guessing that the chamfer was missed at the factory.

    This was a lesson learned the hard way.
     

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