Useful Hints and Tricks •

Discussion in 'Hints & How-to's' started by bkerr, Nov 11, 2009.

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  1. bkerr

    bkerr Registered User
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    #1 bkerr, Nov 11, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 4, 2018
    ===============================================
    NOTE: THIS THREAD IS LOCKED TO FURTHER POSTS.
    TO GO TO THE RELATED OPEN THREAD, CLICK HERE.
    TO GO TO THE INDEX, CLICK HERE.

    --moderator's note
    =============================================== The other day I came up with what I think may be a use for those empty pill bottles that I seem to keep for what ever reason. I don't know why but I just cannot see throwing them in the trash. :mad: Anyway, I have a selection of tapered pins that are packaged in plastic bags. I grabbed a piece of scrap wood, got out the 1 1/4" Forstner bit set the drill press and this is the result. With a few labels I now have a place to put those dang bagged pins. Also, I have a quick reference number in case I need to reorder. -> posts merged by system

    pin storage.jpg bushing storage.jpg
     
  2. bkerr

    bkerr Registered User
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    #2 bkerr, Nov 11, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 28, 2011
    Compiling a thread:

    Bangster's Bright Idea
    USEFUL HINTS & TRICKS INDEX

    FOR LOCKED THREAD THROUGH POST #53
    AND ONGOING THREAD (LINK) THROUGH POST 252
    (NUMBERS WITH LETTER “b”.)


    Adhesive
    mixing epoxy 48b
    Alignment
    winding arbor alignment 20,21,31,32,77b
    Animal hair
    uses for 50b,51b,52b,53b
    Arbor
    winding arbor alignment 20,21,31,32,77b
    Bottles
    pill bottles 1,2; spice bottles 191b
    Bushing
    bushing aid 5; making bushings 212b
    Chain
    determining chain size 33
    Containers
    pill bottles 1,2; spice bottles 191b; 14b,15b
    Cuckoo
    testing rack for cuckoos 167b,172b,173b
    Dial
    re-holing a dial 35
    Dremel
    opening hand hole 206b; uses 218b,219b
    Drill, Drilling
    drill oblique holes 29; drill press 27b,28b,29b,32b; sizing drill bits 131
    Epoxy
    mixing epoxy 48b
    Escapement
    escapement analyzer 232b
    Furniture
    typing table workbench 4; tensor lamp stand 6
    Gauge
    gauges 36; feeler gauge 38b
    Hand
    opening hand hole 206b
    Hermle
    Hermle winding tool 23
    Holder
    tensor lamp stand 6; test stand 26; oil bottle holder 40,41; movement holder 7; roulant holder 37
    Lathe
    lathe cover 4; tools from cut nails 17; tapping with lathe 27b; lathe hints 35b,38b; center finder 239b; testing lathe center 13
    Letdown
    letdown aid 24; letdown tool 25,48,92b;222b
    Lighting
    tensor lamp stand 6
    Lubricants
    oil bottle holder 40,41; oil dippers 47; WD-40 144b,149b
    Mainspring
    measuring mainspring 28; servicing mainspring 28
    Materials
    cut nails 17; bicycle spokes 188b; styrofoam 16; geneva stop retainers 252b; shim stock 38
    Movement
    movement holder 7; roulant holder 37
    Pendulum
    pendulum slip joint 22; pendulum stick repair 151b,152b; temporary pendulum 250b
    Photography
    pictures with loupe 244b,248b
    Pivot
    polishing pivots 243b; door hinge pivot polisher 42
    Plate
    plate supporter 12; plate spreading tool 39
    Procedures
    make a thin washer 3; measure mainspring length 28; service mainspring 28; re-holing a dial 35; the shotgun approach 46; tapping 28b,29b,32b; crushing shellac 177b,183b; gathering pallet removal 199b; opening hand hole 206b; making bushings 212; polishing pivots 243b; drill oblique holes 29; striking clock tutorial 45
    Regulation
    fine-tuning regulation 157b,160b; discussion of regulating 165b
    Screw
    screw sizing plate, screw shortening aid 38; dropped screw catcher 49,52; nut & bolt sizer 124b;
    Shellac
    crushing shellac 177b
    Shim stock
    shim stock 38
    Soldering
    soldering aid 9,10,18,19
    Stand
    tensor lamp stand 6; test stand 26
    Tapping
    tapping with drill press or lathe 28b,29b,32b
    Tools
    clamp 8; pickup tools 14; magnetized screwdriver 15; styrofoam circle cutter 16; tools from cut nails 17; Hermle winding tool 23; tweezers from hemostat 30; gauges 36; plate spreading tool 39; door hinge pivot polisher 42; pullers 43; razorblade radio 67b; nut & bolt sizer 124b; Dremel 218b, 219b;
    Tweezers
    about tweezers 27; tweezers from hemostat 30
    Ultrasonic
    ultasonic hints 44
    Washer
    make a thin washer 3; tension washer 12
    Winding
    winding arbor alignment 20,21,31,32,77b; Hermle winding tool 23
     
  3. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    Here's one you may like:
    Ever need to file an extremely small thin washer or spacer? You didn't?
    Oh well. I did.
    I cut the head off a nail and drove it into this wood block.
    Now I can place the spacer on the nail and file away with absolute control of the piece!
     

    Attached Files:

  4. neighmond

    neighmond Registered User

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    Well these are neat! Here's one I may have shared once before:

    I have a both types of bushings and reamers for my KWM machine, and both in brass and bronze. The machine is sort of a nuisance to store too, so when a friend died I went to his sale and bought the typewriter holder. The paper trays hold the bushings, cleaning brsh, extra reamers, &c. , and the cabinet keeps the bushing tool free from dust and under wraps when not in use.

    Both sides fold down, and the left wing sets a little higher than the right, for those times I want the machine to be higher up. Either way, it is the perfect solution.
    -> posts merged by system <-
    'nother one!

    We all know the lathe will last longer and stay cleaner if covered up when not in use, right? Well the junk shop near me had this for sale for 10 bucks! It's a sewing machine lid. You can find the old domed singer ones sometimes, too.

    Also, an old roll-front bread box will do a pretty nice job holding cutting stones, oil, odds and ends.
     

    Attached Files:

  5. doug sinclair

    doug sinclair Registered User
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    Did you ever re-bush the bearing of the strike side fourth wheel in the back plate, and later find when you went to push the gathering pallet back into place on the extended fourth wheel pivot on the front plate, that you pushed the bushing in the back plate, out? Or on an Urgos triple chime GF movement, when you rebush the time side third wheel pivot in the back plate, when you proceed to re-assemble the spring loaded wheel on the front side that drives the center arbor, that you push the back bushing out? Well I have had these problems in past years. That is until I made the simple tool you'll see in the image. With the clock facing up on assembly pegs, adjust the height of this tool to the correct height, and slide it under the bushing in the back plate. Then proceed and assemble the front components with no problem. This is simply a block of aluminum drilled and tapped, a machine screw or carriage bolt of the correct thread with the head cut off, and a brass cap fitted to the top end to prevent damaging the pivot or the bushing. Slick!
     

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  6. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    Here's one I contrived very recently. Often I find need for strong light on my subject movement and teeter the lamp base on the stand's upright.
    Here's a "CRASH" just waiting to happen.
    Small nail in a scrappa wood; hole in the upright - VOILA!
    Lamp holder platform.
    Hole in upright is larger than nail. When not needed, lift and remove platform!
     

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  7. bkerr

    bkerr Registered User
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    Scottie, that looks like the same nail (prior to wacking) that you had for the bushings. LOL

    Hey guys, I really like the ideas and a couple I will borrow for my shop as well.

    Here is another that I cannot take credit for. This is a clamp that fits in the vice on my table / bench. The orginals were made of good tool steel. The ones I have were made with square key stock that you can get at the local hardware (guess there are not many of those left). They work great, very fast and can be used in both vertical and horizontal position.
    Cost is, a piece of key stock, two socket head cap screws and a few minutes on the mill. Oh yes, drill and tap two holes also.

    I will assemble in the horizontal and unscrew the vise and reposition a plate, filp it vertical to test run the movement.
     

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  8. Dave B

    Dave B Registered User

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    A while back, I needed a small clamp to hard solder a broken rack tail on a Korean clock. I made this one out of a couple of woodruff keys and some 4-40 threaded rod and hex stock. A couple of bushings filed at an angle took care of the rounded backs of the keys. Took maybe half an hour or so - the longest part being spent filing the tips down small enough to fit the job.

    Another little tip - I mounted my small machine tools on cutting boards, so I can hang them on the wall out of the way when I am not using them. I have a 6mm Booley lathe, my Unimat 3 and my springwinder all mounted that way. (The Peavy PA amp in the closet does double duty as a beat amplifier when I am not playing music jobs. I use a clamp on musical instrument tuner pickup that I got for under $20.00 from my local band instrument store.)

    The office supply drawer dividers are a handy way to store pocket watches while they are apart, waiting for parts on order.
     

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  9. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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    Dave, this is what I use to hold 2 pieces close together for soldering. A couple of alligator clips on a steel bar. They can easily be moved closer or further apart. Hold it in a vice or lay it on a piece of hardwood.
     

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  10. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    I use a third hand fixture for the alligator clip setup.
     
  11. Jeff C

    Jeff C Registered User
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    I use this PVC pipe collar as a support for doing bushing work. I added this removable grate for work that needs support like with a small movements. Spacing of the grate is wide enough for all of my KWM cutters. It fits flush with the collar and just drops in. I use this together with a small drill press which I rewired to be controlled by a variac.
     

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  12. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    A rerun for many here, still a good'n - attaching hands to a movement - this one a wiener, where pressure must be applied to the minute hand to load tension washer. You don't wanna bend the crutch or put the anchor pivots at risk in the process.
    A small box with two notches provide clearance for the crutch. Other types of boxes and cutouts may be necessary for other types of movements.
     

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  13. Dave B

    Dave B Registered User

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    If you buy a used lathe - or if like me, you don't trust the lathe you have, you can use a razor blade to check how well the tailstock lines up to center on the headstock. (You can also use it to test whether you have a cutting tool on center against a piece of round stock, if you are using a "fixed" tool post. If the cutting edge of the tool is on center, the blade will be vertical.) Chuck a piece of scrap in the headstock, and turn a tapered point on it. Place a center in the tailstock, bring it up to the headstock, and nip a razor blade between the two. If the centers agree, the blade will be both vertical and perpendicular to the ways. (The side of the tip over tool rest makes a nice perpendicular line for "eyeballing", if you shove it up against the base of the headstock.) For this photo, I purposely threw the tailstock off-center by putting a piece of paper between it and the bed way on one side. Your test will probably not be this far out of whack, so , while clamping the razor blade, rotate the headstock or the tailstock, and watch to see if the razor blade moves. If rotating the headstock makes it move - the bearings need adjustment. It will probably wobble back and forth in one or both planes. (It does on all four of my lathes when I rotate the tailstock spindle.) When I need to do accurate work, I do this first and find the "sweet spot", then take care not to rotate the tailstock spindle.

    (WHEW!! - It took more time to type this than it does to do the test.!)
    -> posts merged by system <-
    When tapping a drilled hole, I chuck the tap in the drill press, and start it in turning the quill by hand. That way, I know the tap is not going in askew. I do the same thing using a die to cut external threads - I leave the workpiece in the lathe, and use the tailstock with a flat pusher to keep the die perpendicular to the workpiece.
     

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  14. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    "Look into a feeler gauge";
    Hmmmmm. Never tried that.
    Anyway, here's one. The mechanic's helper. NO shop should be without at least one. Here, three: One, a jointed end, one a pencil style, and th' big boy for fishing stuff out from underneath th' fridge. A jillion uses for 'em like picking up teeny hands or microsize washers, bolts, nuts, etc. near impossible to pick up with your fangers.
    Mechanics' helpers - ours too.
     

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  15. bkerr

    bkerr Registered User
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    You are right Scottie on those tools.
    I keep them near the bench when things land on the floor.

    Here is another one for you. I work on quite a few cuckoos. When putting the screws back in the case for the movement I keep a screw driver that has been magnetized to hold the screw so it does not drop off the end of the screw driver.

    I also use the same screw driver as a chain grabber. when you are putting the chains through the case, the magnetized screw driver will grab the chain allowing you to finish pulling the chain through the case.

    These two will save a bunch of time.:eek:
     
  16. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    Ever need to make a nice circular disk in styroforam or a hole perhaps? Find an appropriat size can, cut off top or bottom and the resulting edge will cut a beautiful hole or disk like magic with near zero crumbs!
     
  17. Dave B

    Dave B Registered User

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    Cut nails are handy for making small lathe tools. The steel in them is already hardened, so all you have to do is grind them to size. Here are a few. The photograph was taken through a 10X lens.
     

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  18. Bill Bassett

    Bill Bassett Registered User
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    I liberated some spring hair clips from my wife and daughter. They make excellent soldering fixtures/clamps, especially the aluminum ones about three inches long. Solder does not stick to aluminum. You can bend them, file slots cut them short, file points, etc. They only cost about a buck fifty or so for six of them. The most useful ones are where I bent one jaw at right angles and filed a sharp point. To get the picture, place the tip of your index finger at right angles against the palm of your other hand. This allows you to clamp parts that may be uneven or tapered.

    I also find that aluminum roof flashing is useful as a heat shield to protect those portions of a workpiece against the heat of a torch. Flashing is also useful to make quick fixtures for holding odd-size workpieces. I have also held parts in crumbled aluminum foil.
     
  19. RJSoftware

    RJSoftware Registered User

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    I finally have some descent soldering success.

    Thing I found out (the hard way) was that I was working with too little of heat.

    I had 2 standard wand type soldering irons and two soldering guns.

    But, none of them was really hot enough. They are hot enough to do what they are designed to do, which is solder wire type connections.

    But when it came to soldering two pieces of brass (ex. dial bezel) there was just insufficient heat.

    Anyway, found the solution.

    At the Goodwill I found an older propane torch kit. One of the devices fits on to the end of standard pencil propane torch.

    The piece has has a metal tip like a small flat screw driver and venting to allow the flame to exit.

    I can put the flame on low (just a trickle) and it heats up very well.

    Before I'd hold the soldering gun for 5-10 minutes waiting for the brass to heat up, and winding up with a cold joint.

    With this thing just touch the area and in about 30 to 40 seconds the neighboring solder melts.

    https://mb.nawcc.org/

    RJ
     
  20. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    Anyway, now that my tube manual is correct - back to hints 'n trix and another kind of tube.
    Installing a movement to a case and need the dial aligned to winding arbors?
    Aquarium tubing or wooden dowel drilled for winding arbors keeps dial aligned to arbors!
     

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  21. Al Schook

    Al Schook Registered User
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    I have used cutoff wire nuts to align the arbors in the holes. They come in several sizes and usually you can quickly find another to replace the one you "put away where you could always find it!" I recently bought some of the fancy "stepped" ones. TIP: Don't install them with the largest diameter toward the front plate! What a maroon!!
    :D:Party:
     
  22. al_taka

    al_taka Registered User

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    Because of Overwhelming Requests I'm posting the Pendulum Slip Joint Trick here with picture. I realize the accuracy of my drawing would put a cad program to shame so bear with me.

    The idea is to make a pendulum rod grow and shrink when your trying to figure out the correct length. This slip joint is made quickly and can be used on most pendulum rod clocks just by varying the music wire length. Make sure to cut the wire too long and let the slip joint make it shorter.

    When you flex the mainspring stock, it allows room for the music wire to slide and when you let go it grabs the wire. Real simple idea.

    Use a hole punch and space the holes far enough apart so they sorta line up when you compress the mainspring stock which is about 3 or 4 inches. For smaller clocks just scale everything down.

    I haven't needed one yet but my friend has made it and it works so well he left it in the clock permanently.
     

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  23. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    Hi List,

    If you work on a lot of Hermle clocks, buy a 8-0 chime key. This is #8 winding and '0' for rate setting. They are available from Merrits (page 76) and others. This is a good (large wing) winding key for the strong Hermle springs and the '0' little end fits the hand shaft square perfectly, so you can test the chime function easily.

    Merry Christmas, Willie X
     
  24. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    On the subyek of keys, etc., this helpful hint.
    Need to deal with - remove a spring with your winder but don't have a small enough bit? Letdown key? Cut the barrel off a key that fits and grind/file a square on it that fits one of your larger bits. Insert the small bit adaptor into the larger and VOILA!
     

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  25. Mike Phelan

    Mike Phelan Registered User

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    Thanks, Robert. We just call them side cutters here; I sort of guessed about the wire nuts - here they are called "Scruits"; that used to be the brand name years ago, but like Biro and Hoover, it's become a generic term. Most are white and made from ceramic.

    As for keys, I made a set of let-down keys from a pair of star key ends, a plug spanner and a piece of rolling pin - it's also used on my spring winder:
     

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  26. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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  27. flynwill

    flynwill Registered User
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    Re: Tweezer maintenance

    Some time ago I put together a little howto:

    http://www.flynwill.com/Watches/Tweezers/

    I don't know if my technique is particularly good or bad, it's just what made sense to me. Comments are welcome.
     
  28. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    #28 bangster, Jan 1, 2010
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2012
    Compiling a thread:

    I'm posting this mainly for the benefit of folks newbier-than-me.

    I've seen various procedures described for getting at the full length of a mainspring, for cleaning, inspecting, and lubing. Some of them call for stretching it out full length. The method I use is the simplest and easiest I know of. It involves little stretching, and no special setup. I didn't invent it, and don't recall where I learned it...probably from somebody on this MB. I imagine a lot of people use it.

    View attachment 50313 View attachment 50314

    With the spring unwound, I hook it over the handle of my Joe Collins winder (free plug for JOE, who makes the best 'uns around)...between the coils, not through the center. From there, simply walk up it a few inches at a time, letting it coil back up behind my hand, until I get to the center, then releasing it a few inches at a time so's it can coil back up normally. I don't try to mess with those last few tight coils in the center, which don't do anything anyway. But I do check for cracks or tears in the arbor-hook hole or nearby.

    Pulling it through, I scrub it down full length with steel wool dipped in mineral spirits, removing rust and crud and inspecting for cracks and problem areas. I wipe it down full length with a rag as I let it coil back up. Then I take a rag charged with mainspring lube, and lube it all the way up, and back again. All done.

    Barring problems, it takes under five minutes to service a mainspring...and you never have to walk away from your spring winder.

    bangster

    To measure length, lay a tape measure on top of the spring as you pull it out. Measure as far as you can, estimate the few inner coils.
     

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  29. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    The challenge here was to drill two, 3/8" holes obliquely thru these wooden cubes. They are regulating weights for a foliot arm. My solution was to make a fixture that would snugly fit the cubes. The hole was located off center of thickness to accomodate the cubes, thinner than the 2 X 4 used for the fixture.
     

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  30. hoo-boy

    hoo-boy Registered User

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    Compiling a thread:

    There has been some good info about tweezers lately . This is not exactly tweezers but I use hemostats in my clockwork as well as flytying, gunsmith work, etc. but find that the locking mechainism is sometimes a pain, locking when you don't need it too. On one I cut this off with a dremel and smoothed it back up and found that this works very well when ya need a heavy pair of tweezers. I made 2 pair one with smooth jaws(ground smooth) the other as is. find I reach for them quite frequently ....hoo-boy
     
  31. LaBounty

    LaBounty Registered User
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    Installing an identical replacement movement for a modern German movement can be quite difficult without the "winding arbor locators" Shutt refers to. (Timesavers Part No. 23153, pg. 68, catalog no. 35) These hard plastic locators slip over the wind arbor or center shaft and help keep everything aligned while the movement feet are manipulated to line up with the original screw holes.

    They turn a 20 minute job into a 2 minute job.
     
  32. LaBounty

    LaBounty Registered User
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    Back-mounted modern German movements, like those found on some wall clocks, are a bit more difficult but the winding arbor locators can still be used.

    -With the power let down, loosen the movement feet slightly so they can be adjusted with a bit of force.
    -Slip the movement over the studs in the back board or secure to the case with screws.
    -Loosely lay the dial over the movement and install the locators.
    -Shift the dial and movement together until the dial is in the proper place. This will shift the position of the movement feet.
    -Put a finger on the center shaft to hold the movement in place and remove the dial and locators.
    -Carefully remove the movement and tighten the nuts being sure that their positions don't change. It is sometimes advantageous to do one at a time, repeating the whole "locator" process until all four feet are tight.
     
  33. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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    :thumb:Finding chain size for cuckoos and other chain drive clocks.
    This was posted by John Farnan (a fellow chapter 33 member) on the Blackforest Yahoo group page and I thought our members might find it useful:
    "The points on the sprocket are the important thing. If you cut a piece of paper in a strip that will fit inside the sprocket, and then gently press it in, the sprocket points will mark the paper. Then you can go to the page in Timesavers that has the chain patterns photocopied, and compare the sprocket points to the center of the chain links on the pattern. This should give you an accurate selection of chain."
    Thanks, John
     
  34. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    Compiling a thread:

    Useful Hints and Tricks: A compilation.
     
  35. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    Hi List,

    Hope this tip isn't already covered but here goes.

    If you do a lot of modern clock repair, it has been very helpful to me to collect front and back plates from several of the common movements. Strip them clean of rivets, post, etc. Carefully and precisely enlarge the front plate holes to 7/16" diameter. Then loosely wire the pair together and mark the pair with bold markings for identification.

    When you need to re-hole a (new or old) dial to fit a modern movement these plates make the job much easier. Just use the back plate (little holes) if you want to mark centers, and the front plates (7/16" holes) for reference in finishing the key holes.

    There is no doubt about things lining up as the template you are using is the actual movement plates.

    Willie X
     
  36. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    Gauges I've made. Gauges come in a myriad of types and are very useful for quickly ascertaining a value of sort. Here's two I've made - a simple thread gauge making it easy to quickly identify a thread in question - nut or bolt. I made another for metric. The other is a drill bit size gauge nos. 1 to 60 - handy when you may be seeking a "go"/"no-go" reference.
     

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  37. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    #37 bangster, Jan 24, 2010
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2017
    I thought I'd re-post this simple little gadget. It's a movement holder for French roulant movements ...grasps the movement by the bottom pillar. Also works for alarm clocks.
    View attachment 52316 View attachment 52317
    The prototype, posted here several years ago (wish I could remember who dunnit), was made of block aluminum. I didn't have any, so I used oak. Seems to work just as well.

    bangster

    I've since learned that the prototype was made by Doug Sinclair. Thanks, Doug.
     

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  38. Dave B

    Dave B Registered User

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    Or one of these. The big advantage to this particular plate is it is hardened.I buy American machine screws by the gross in 1" lengths. That way, I can simply runthe length of screw I need though the plate, shear the excess length off with a cold chisel, and back the screw out, thus cleaning up the last thread, and it is good to ready to install. No messing about withclamping the screw in something, sawing it off and filing the end, all of which eats up time. And there is no need to stock a gzillion different lengths of screws of each size. So I just have six bins for each size screw: round head, flat head and cheese head, in brass and stainless. And buying them in bulk is a heck of a sight cheaper than buying in little shrink packs of anywhere from four to a dozen.
     

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  39. Dave B

    Dave B Registered User

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    Here is another super-handy tool when you get the movement back together and discover the durned strike wheel with the locking pin is a tooth or two out of sync. As we all know, sometimes it can be an excercise in frustration to spread the plates enough to disengage and turn that wheel, without losing a whole slew of pivots all down the line. With these pliers, you can remove the nut on the corner pillar nearest the wheel, and loosen a couple of others. Then it is just a matter of spreading the plates and relocating the one wheel (and usually the fly, because its pivot falls out of the upper plate, and it flops around.) I originally bought these when I was doing automotive engine building. They are designed for spreading piston rings, and are available from nearly all the automotive parts houses. With the long handles, you have lots of control over how far you spread the plates.

    Incidentally, I at one time had the serations ground off the jaws, and discovered they have a tendency to slip. So I restored the checkering and now I just put a matchbook cover between the jaws and the plates to keep from marring things. I know most of you guys don't own a checkering file; that is the advantage of having worked as a gunsmith for a few years.:)
     

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  40. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    I'm clumsy. I've spilled far more oil than properly used so I made a spilpruf bottle holder by cutting a hole in a smal, squat box.
     

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  41. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    Yep. Here's mine. Notice high-tech oil cup (crown cap epoxied to a metal scrap) and cover (from a milk jug).

    View attachment 54336

    bangster
     

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  42. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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  43. Charles E. Davis

    Charles E. Davis Registered User
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    Re: Pullers

    I never had much luck with pullers. They seemed to be clutsy and awkward. Never fitting in where they needed to go.
    My best success was in using square steel tube. Pick up pieces of scrap from a local shop.
    All you need is a hacksaw and a file and a machine screw tap. I have never had any problem with the threads in the tube not holding up for the jobs with clocks that I have been involved with. Also I have used a wide variety of machine screws to make the pushers. A couple of nuts "jammed" on the head end give planty of pressure with your fingers, most of the time.
    You notice that I often cut the slot in more than one side of the square and cut away the sides enough to get into tight places.
    Like they say, try it and you will find they really work. This goes along with my door hinge dead center lathe pivot polisher!
    https://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?t...pivot+polisher
     

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  44. Thyme

    Thyme Registered Users

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    What makes an ultrasonic cleaning unit fail? This question has been asked numerous times in this forum. Since these cleaning units are part of my equipment service business I will pass along what I know with certainty.

    There are two predominant causes of failure of an ultrasonic tank. One is chemical abuse, meaning use of acidic or caustic solutions in the tank. An ultrasonic tank is made of stainless steel and it is vulnerable to anything that will degrade that material of which it is made. Once a tank becomes corroded or perforated it is not repairable. L&R was a pioneer in ultrasonic cleaner design and use. They usually recommended putting their cleaning solutions in glass beakers that would be suspended in the tank, which would hold a bath of plain water. Since ultrasonic vibration is transmitted through all the liquid in the tank, it makes no difference whether there is a water bath present; but using a water bath will never harm the tank, whereas using a chemical solution directly in the tank can have the potential to do so. An exception would be detergent solutions that will not degrade stainless steel, in which case they can be used directly in the tank with no ill effect.

    Another cause of tank failure is that of a mechanical nature: if any objects are placed directly on the floor of the tank and they vibrate against it during cavitation, the action can cause failure of the transducers. Transducers are mounted on the underside of the tank surface and are the components that transmit the ultrasonic waves to the tank. They are not easily replaced and their failure usually renders the unit unrepairable. Thus the use of suspended glass beakers is recommended in a water bath. Alternatively, wire baskets are available for use with solution directly in the tank, designed to be suspended in the tank to keep objects from contacting the floor of the tank. If you don't want to buy the baskets you can improvise, using soft plastic or styrofoam containers instead to prevent shock impact to the floor of the tank.

    The final possible cause of unit failure is that of electronics. If that occurs it is not the fault of the user, but rather the design of the circuitry of the unit. Low priced machines of foreign manufacture can be of low quality and more susceptible to this type of deficiency; you get what you pay for.

    (A note to the moderators: feel free to make this a sticky for future reference if you think it is worthwhile.)
     
  45. Mike Phelan

    Mike Phelan Registered User

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    This was originally going to be a bit of an explanation on how to assemble and time the striking system, as I’ve seen quite a lot of confusion on the subject with suggestions on unnecessary splitting the plates and suchlike, but I thought I might as well go the whole hog and show a complete overhaul, so here we go.

    Remember that these were assembled on a production line where time is money, so the movements were made for easy assembly!

    As it’s quite a mundane job, feel free to yawn, snooze, or hit the [close] button.

    Subject:
    Smiths Enfield striking mantel clock. Inside rear of case shows a date 13-10-1951, for those who must know these things. A middle-of-the-range clock which should last for years and will surely appreciate in value.

    Fault:
    Not been run for a while; stopped when it was fully wound (surprise surprise!).

    Assessment:
    Probably gummed up mainsprings. I removed the movement, and after letting the springs down, they sounded and felt quite sticky, with numerous thumps and bumps!
    A look at the pivot holes saw that no bushing was needed, not even when I rocked the barrels. This latter is a favourite place for needing bushing, especially as the distance between the pivots is less that those of the train, and there is more power there. These have quite wide bushes, so wear well.
    The strip pallets weren’t worn, just polished, but the movement was very dirty. As the screw slots were all burred, it had been dismantled before and I suspected that the wheels and pinions might have been oiled as well.
    The suspension was undamaged despite the fact the clock had been carried with the bob attached.
    I don’t remove the star cam on the cannon pinion as the robust centre arbor can be washed and oiled before reassembly. As the wheel is at the back, it usually doesn’t wear much.

    Repair and assembly:
    So, the usual strip down, starting with the dial work. There are three of those awful bent pin things on the warning lever, rack hook and centre wheel spider spring. A paper clip is the right material and size to make new ones.
    You cannot remove the barrels until the centre wheel is removed.

    After removing the mainsprings there were no cracks in the holes, so I straightened them out to full length apart from the last couple of turns on the inside, wiped them with petrol to remove the sticky gunge and put them in plastic bags with a mixture of clock grease and turret clock oil, ready for later.
    All pivots were filed and burnished, but were quite good to start with.
    The remainder of the parts had a wash in ammoniated cleaner, followed with hot water and a dry in the oven.

    Springs put back by hand, lubricant cleaned off, inner coils checked to see if it gripped the arbors and a clean on the teeth and outside with IPA after the messy job of refitting the springs.

    Back together, barrels first, then a smear of oil on the centre arbor; fitted the washer, wheel and spring, all retained by the paper clip part. A quick check to test the friction.

    Everything else goes in and there’s no need at all to bother about timing the striking train; see later. Left pallets and dial work and hammer out at this time, but a tiny bit of TC oil on the hammer arbor pivots and its detent that interacts with the star.
    Oiled the barrel arbor pivots and assembled the ratchets and cocks, all including the clicks, with turret clock oil, then watch oil on all the other pivots, and a half turn on both sides of the key to make sure all was OK; it was whirring away nicely.

    Now to reassemble the dial work and set the timing for the strike; two “L” shaped paper clip bits ready for the rack hook and warning lever attachments.

    Here’s the way to do it:
    Fit warning lever (no lubrication) and clip, and if the Bend Fairy has been there, ensure that the 2-lobe cam on the cannon pinion can rotate backwards so the detent on the warning lever goes in front of a lobe.
    Fit rack hook, same sort of clip and no lube.
    The end faces on the detents that rub need a smear of oil.
    Hook the springs on the hammer arbor and rack hook, bending if necessary.

    Sometimes, the stop arm on the hammer arbor can get bent forwards or back; do not mend the tongue on the back plate that forms a rest for the arm. Give half a turn on the key and whilst lifting the rack hook train runs half a turn of the warning wheel at a time, allow the hammer arbor to “fall” and holding things there when the rack hook detent is arrested by the warning pin.

    At this point, there should be about 2mm clearance between the hammer detent and the next point on the star wheel to give (a) sufficient lift for the hammer and (b) to ensure the train can accelerate up to sped after the hammer blow. Adjust by bending the stop arm towards or away from the back plate.

    Clip something on the fly so the train cannot run. You can now fit the gathering pallet so the rack hook detent goes in the notch. By giving it a small tap with something like a piece of brass tube.

    When you take the clip off the fly and lift and drop the warning lever, the train should run for one blow and immediately stop after the last blow – there might be a slight adjustment needed by rotating the GP; if the train only runs one turn of the warning wheel and locks, the detent is not rising from the gathering pallet notch sufficiently; rotate gathering pallet anticlockwise.
    If it is out in the other direction it will fail to lock at all.

    When this is done, give the gathering pallet another tap with your brass tube to lock it securely. See – no plate splitting!

    Next thing is the motion work and rack. Clip a clothes peg on the escape wheel and turn the centre arbor until the longest lobe on the cannon pinion just allows the warning lever to drop – this is the hour. Fit the minute wheel and hour wheel (no clip yet) and the rack (with its clip). Adjust the meshing of the motion work so the rack falls on the snail centrally on the 10 or 11 steps, not, and I repeat not, on the 12! Why not? The big step on the snail is undercut so the 12 step is longer. As with many clocks.

    When this is done, give a few turns so the minute wheel pinion is visible, and fit the washer (ridge inwards) and clip, so the hour wheel cannot become out of mesh. When the rack drops, the sloping peg that falls on the snail should have its chamfered end halfway across the thickness of the snail with the hour wheel pushed right in. This is to allow the clock to run or the hands to be turned without jamming after 12.

    That was about it; back to first-person now!
    A wire brush on the hammer leather to soften it – they go hard over time and make an awful clang.
    I smeared the pallets and put tiny bit of oil on the pivots, then screwed the back cock on lightly. With a small turn of the key, I gently raised the cock until the train ran. It needs to be as deep as possible without catching teeth, or you’ll waste power with drop. Allow a turn of the wheel or two in case of teeth not perfect, and don’t hold anything.
    Finally, suspension and pendulum leader on; minute smear on crutch slot, and suspension clamped but free enough for a bit of fore-and-aft movement.

    Back on test stand, and job done!



    Mods - worth a sticky?






     

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  46. RJSoftware

    RJSoftware Registered User

    Apr 15, 2005
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    Re: Is this lack of power...or what?

    Now this is the typical situation that calls for the shotgun approach as Dave had previously mentioned in other thread.

    When all anylitical fails, time to do house cleaning.

    First, a good loupe. I have found that when you go past 10x, the world changes...!

    And all I have is a 12x. But I think it's the perfect amount of magnification for me.

    So, while you do your initial bushing exam (with finger pressure back and forth on main wheel) you got that 12x power.

    It is tempting to let some bushings slide when they only show just a little biddy bit of slop.

    I think the hard and fast rule is they should not wiggle 1/3 or more of their diametor. Least what I recall from recollection.

    Of course the standard practice of cleaning, filing, burnishing, pegging and oiling.

    Saying things like "don't forget to file out rutts on your palettes" sorta seems like a mother reminding kids to clean behind the ears.

    Then I see you mention the possible skipping of ew teeth, so anchor depth needs tweeking maybe.

    Do all of that anyway, this being the shotgun approach.

    We should shorten this and say, did you shotgun?

    Now, when you shotgun, and you get no good results, then your in trouble...!!!!!!

    With a name like BANG...! You should know the shotgun...!

    Let's see if we can describe perfectly the shotgun.


    ------------------------
    Shotgun:

    1. Power down movment. Use letdown tool if spring power.

    2. Do preliminary cleaning. To make handling easier. Duncan swish.

    3. Examine bushings for wiggle. With thumb pressure, wiggle main wheels back and forth examining pivot tips reaction. Repair bushing if tips wiggle 1/3 or more of diametor. Mark them with marker.

    4. Disassemble movement and clean movment. Use ultrasonic if you wanna. Not me. Tooth brush and dish soap.

    5. File and burnish all pivots that need it. Goal is cylindrical and shiney with burnished surface. Check that all pivots and arbor are true. Not bent.

    6. Check all pivot bushing relations. Repair marked bushings if needed. The goal being that the gear should stand in plate with aproximate 5 to 10 degrees of lean. Remember if a pivot needed filing/burnishing, then you may need to repair bushing hole as pivot will be smaller.

    7. File and burnish palettes if needed. No rutts.

    8. Tweek ew teeth points. No shark's teeth.

    9. Check mainspring conditions, if applicable, repair/replace (some stretch out mainspring and stone the edges -not me, too much bother) look for cracks, if ok lube.

    10. Check each gear tooth condition. Check for bent tooth and/or worn down teeth. Pay special attention to pinions (the small gear). Excessive wear causes bad mesh. A bad mesh will stop movement. Some pinions can be repaired using sewing needle as trundles. Others are cut from solid stock and replacing the gear is better option. Large gear teeth can be replaced with dove tail method.

    11. Examine levers. Usually nothing needed but might need slight bend/tweeking. Check that levers move freely and not too much slop in bushing.

    12. Re-assemble.

    13. Lube bushings.

    14. Test.

    When testing ...

    Do low speed test. With minimal power (a few turns with key on spring wind) check how easily train runs. Check that movement does not stop with any gears in same location. Use clock hands to help identify this.

    If low speed passes:

    Adjust beat.
    Adjust anchor depth for maximum swing.

    When done:
    Regulate.

    End of shotgun defined.
    ---------------------

    So Bang, did you shotgun?

    RJ
     
  47. Jay Fortner

    Jay Fortner Registered User
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    I was in the need for oil dippers so I made some. They're straws from carbuerator cleaner cans(brake cleaner,etc.) I held them against the side of my bench grinder and brought them to a point,then heated them with a cigarette lighter and bent them. What's nice about these is when you dip them they draw about a drop of oil up into the capillary so one dip goes a long way. When you're done just blow on the end to expell the unused oil back into your dipper well or bottle.
     

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  48. depatty

    depatty Registered User

    Feb 2, 2011
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    Been needing a letdown tool but couldn't see paying what the store bought ones cost. Got to thinking about the way the Joe Collins handled the problem with his mainspring winder and decided that the same solution could be applied to a letdown tool.

    Dug around in the junk tools box and found another (cheap version of the) Hanson/Irwin tap wrench. Cut a piece off of a broken post hole digger handle, turned it down in the lathe, and drilled a hole in one end for the tap wrench to fit in. Removed the slide handle from the tap wrench and cut off a piece of it long enough to fit through the wood handle. Measured the wood to locate where the hole in the tap wrench would be and drilled a hole in the wood. Seated the tap wrench in the wood with a couple of hammer blows and drove the cut off piece through both the wood and tap wrench which locked it in place nicely. Found a large brass bushing from the brass junk box that would fit the handle to use as a ferrule, drove it on over the locking pin and turned it down to fit. Sanded the handle down a bit and now have an adjustable letdown tool. :cool:

    Pictures of the finished piece below. Realized after finishing it that I should have taken pictures of the process but was a bit too late. Any questions, just ask.

    Thanks for the inspiration Joe!
    Dave
     

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  49. Robert Gary

    Robert Gary Registered User
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    Once, while working in a customer’s very old home, I was growing increasingly frustrated with a tiny screw that secured the hour hand on her GF clock. After about the sixth time dropping it and crawling around on my knees with a flashlight looking for it (hardly professional looking), I noticed the handyman working in the same room with me.

    He was busy installing a bolt in the adobe (yes, adobe) walls using an electric drill. To prevent the debris from the drilling from getting on the floor, he had formed a piece of newspaper into a little “shelf” and, using blue painter’s tape, secured it to the wall below where he was to drill the hole.

    What a great idea! I made one for myself, and although it took several more tries (dropping the screw) before I was successful, the shelf made it infinitely easier!

    This picture shows how it looks on a clock in my home.

    RobertG
     

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  50. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    Re: Handy hint

    Oho! Good to know. :thumb:
     

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