Urgos UW 32/11 Chimes don't stop and Doesn't sync with hour strike.

nwilson

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Feb 26, 2021
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Hi all. Total noob here. I'm a museum professional and tinkerer. I've always been fascinated by clocks and watches but never had the energy to take on a new hobby. In my line of work I am quite detail oriented and careful in my processes, but clocks are new to me.

My grandmother has a grandmother clock that my grandfather made for her many decades ago. After he passed away it was not oiled or looked after regularly and stopped keeping time.

I did my research and learned how to clean, oil, adjust the pendulum timing, etc. The basic maintenance stuff. It is currently working fine and keeping accurate time (at least for the last week ). All pivots are still in beautiful shape, my grandfather took fabulous care of it. The autocorrect function hadn't worked in years and isn't currently clicking into place.

After cleaning and oiling the pivots, I re-set the movement in the case and got it going again the chime wouldn't quit after it started, and the strike just keeps going. I've read through the thread listed below which seems to be a very similar issue to mine. The two hooks in the upper right aren't catching the rod on on gear 4 (or 5). They seem to be raised above the arc and they wiggle when the whole chime cycle starts, but they don't drop. When I removed the movement from the case I tipped it forward and didn't think to keep it perfectly vertical when I transported it to my work station. I'm wondering if anything could have shifted during the walk from the case to my work station? (I did the work about 10 feet from where the clock has lived for decades, no car trips ).

I hesitate to loosen any setscrews anywhere because up until it stopped a few years ago it hadn't been jostled or moved violently so I doubt anything would have come loose and I couldn't find anything that seemed loose, bent or in anyway stuck.

My thought is that there is some very basic thing I need to do in order to get the two little hooks in the upper right to drop, but for the life of me, I can't see what is preventing them from doing the job that they seem to want to be doing.

I know this is a little bit of over explaining. But I wanted to be fairly thorough on my process and the steps I've taken to this point.

I have a couple videos of it chiming away, but I'm not sure they're helpful.


Thanks much.

noah
 

Dick Feldman

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A couple of things that I feel should be said. Your movement is of Urgos manufacture. Urgos went out of business many years ago. Movements made during the time when yours was made had a usable life span of about 20-25 years. Clock movements, like all machines will suffer power problems towards the end of their useful life spans. Those power losses are due to friction due to wear due to long use. There are two effective methods to solve wear in clock movements. One is to properly rebuild the existing movement and the other is to replace with a new movement if available. The Urgos name is now used by Hermle and they make new movements to fit where many of the old, discontinued Urgos movements were.
Cleaning oiling and adjusting are not bad for clock movements but it should be understood that those operations are preventative rather than being curative. None of the three will solve wear, which is the number one problem of aged clock movements. I would also caution you about information sources. There is much information given on the Internet that is false and there are many poor practices promoted. You can even get less than reliable advice from some members on this board. Repairs using clean, oil and adjust as primary functions will normally result in short term operation and most times a movement that will operate no better than before the process. Consider that a dirty movement in good shape will run. More oil and adjustment are not viable cures for wear either.
You may have picked a poor movement to start on. The one you have is quite complicated. If you want to continue with clock repair, you may want to put that movement aside for a while and start with one that is much simpler.
The chime/strike sequencing with your movement can be corrected but that job is not one for a rank amateur. One must first understand what and why things are happening.
This brings to mind replacing the movement with a new movement. The change out is a fairly straightforward operation and is within the realm of a beginner. The new movement will come with a warranty and be dependable.
Best of luck with your venture and welcome to the message board.

Best Regards,

Dick
 

nwilson

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Feb 26, 2021
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A couple of things that I feel should be said. Your movement is of Urgos manufacture. Urgos went out of business many years ago. Movements made during the time when yours was made had a usable life span of about 20-25 years. Clock movements, like all machines will suffer power problems towards the end of their useful life spans. Those power losses are due to friction due to wear due to long use. There are two effective methods to solve wear in clock movements. One is to properly rebuild the existing movement and the other is to replace with a new movement if available. The Urgos name is now used by Hermle and they make new movements to fit where many of the old, discontinued Urgos movements were.
Cleaning oiling and adjusting are not bad for clock movements but it should be understood that those operations are preventative rather than being curative. None of the three will solve wear, which is the number one problem of aged clock movements. I would also caution you about information sources. There is much information given on the Internet that is false and there are many poor practices promoted. You can even get less than reliable advice from some members on this board. Repairs using clean, oil and adjust as primary functions will normally result in short term operation and most times a movement that will operate no better than before the process. Consider that a dirty movement in good shape will run. More oil and adjustment are not viable cures for wear either.
You may have picked a poor movement to start on. The one you have is quite complicated. If you want to continue with clock repair, you may want to put that movement aside for a while and start with one that is much simpler.
The chime/strike sequencing with your movement can be corrected but that job is not one for a rank amateur. One must first understand what and why things are happening.
This brings to mind replacing the movement with a new movement. The change out is a fairly straightforward operation and is within the realm of a beginner. The new movement will come with a warranty and be dependable.
Best of luck with your venture and welcome to the message board.

Best Regards,

Dick
Thanks for the reply Dick. My main goal is to make my grandmother happy since the clock is her main connection to my grandfather. I totally get that this is not an entry level project. I'm not trying to get into watch or clock repair an old neighbor of mine used to do that so I'm well aware of the level of skill required to rebuild it. We have a budgetary concerns (and I'm currently between jobs) which is why I'm attempting to nurse this unit along for a few more years as none of the pivots have elongated, but maybe the teeth aren't meshing as nicely as they once did or the teeth on the sprockets aren't happy any more, many small things can equal disfunction.

Your recommendation of a new movement makes some sense, I'll look into that, maybe the whole family would want to chip in a few shekels for this project. I'll have another go at this unit first though.

Thanks

Noah
 

shutterbug

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I think seeing the video would help here. I agree that things probably didn't get moved, so something is preventing the stop lever from activating. If we could see it from the front and upper right side it would help in our analysis.
You'll have to upload it to Youtube and link to it here. We don't support video yet.
 

Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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Look at "Urgos Grandfather works problem" from Tuesday past (4 days ago).
This is how you adjust the hooks.
Willie X
 

nwilson

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Feb 26, 2021
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Look at "Urgos Grandfather works problem" from Tuesday past (4 days ago).
This is how you adjust the hooks.
Willie X
Thanks all. I'll go to my grandmother's later this week and grab a couple of videos of the areas I think are problematic and put them up later this week. I really appreciate how quickly you folks are getting back to me. I was expecting no replies
 

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