• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

Unusual Touchon

Dr. Jon

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This is a watch I have owned long enough that I do not recall when and where I bought it as a loose movement.

It is very different from other Touchons I have seen so I am wondering if others have seen similar or if this one is fake,

MVT-s.png

I have put it into this gold filled case, which fits is very well.
 
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thesnark17

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If by "copy", you mean "build a watch with similar visual aesthetics", then yes, Gruen copied it. But the typical Verithin does not follow the Touchon as closely. Your 50th Anniversary has a similar click, but most Verithins did not have such high-end features, and I think that without the click, the resemblance is not so striking.

But even so, we know that the look of the plates doesn't necessarily have anything to do with the design underneath. Just look at all the myriad variations in plates and bridges within single models from Illinois, Waltham, and many Swiss companies as well. Underneath, where it 'matters' so to speak, the timekeeping parts are the same. (Or look at the Ball models - Waltham and Hamilton watches that are superficially the same, but underneath completely different.) And Gruen Verithin watches were supposed to be using a completely new, patented, train arrangement that should preclude even casual copying of Touchon's design.

I would say rather that the flowing curves were a popular visual aesthetic that many Swiss makers appreciated and used. And American makers too - Hamilton produced a lady's movement with similar features, and South Bend 12 size watches have a passing resemblence to the Gruens (is it in the company DNA?). I much prefer the sweeping curves to some of the other styles that have been in vogue over the years!
 

artbissell

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If by "copy", you mean "build a watch with similar visual aesthetics", then yes, Gruen copied it. But the typical Verithin does not follow the Touchon as closely. Your 50th Anniversary has a similar click, but most Verithins did not have such high-end features, and I think that without the click, the resemblance is not so striking.

But even so, we know that the look of the plates doesn't necessarily have anything to do with the design underneath. Just look at all the myriad variations in plates and bridges within single models from Illinois, Waltham, and many Swiss companies as well. Underneath, where it 'matters' so to speak, the timekeeping parts are the same. (Or look at the Ball models - Waltham and Hamilton watches that are superficially the same, but underneath completely different.) And Gruen Verithin watches were supposed to be using a completely new, patented, train arrangement that should preclude even casual copying of Touchon's design.

I would say rather that the flowing curves were a popular visual aesthetic that many Swiss makers appreciated and used. And American makers too - Hamilton produced a lady's movement with similar features, and South Bend 12 size watches have a passing resemblence to the Gruens (is it in the company DNA?). I much prefer the sweeping curves to some of the other styles that have been in vogue over the years!
Interesting appropriate comments appreciated. The 50th certainly only an appearance copy of the well known good performance one. art b
 

sternerp

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Hi Dr. Jon!
Jules Monard (Geneva) used also very often this type of ebauche! As a private label watch i have been seen also J E Caldwell so one.
Here are examples of this (the serial numbers are aligned to your touchon movement).

jules monard 2.jpg jules monard 3_1.jpg jules monard 6_1.jpg jules monard 8_1.jpg j e caldwell by jules monard 1_1.jpg
 

sternerp

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Just one more comment, i think this two Touchons, and the Agassiz is very similar to these.
I would not be very surprised if it turns out, that originally both types of LeCoutre ebauche ;-)
Once when i get to the LeCoultre factory Heritage Gallery, i will check this!

agassiz8.jpg touchon 8_1.jpg touchon 1_1.jpg
 
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Dr. Jon

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Prichard lists Monard as a high grade maker exclusively imported into the US by Wittnauer. Wittnauer also was the agent and, eventually, owner of Touchon.



The Caldwell very likely also came via Wittanuer since they were a wholesaler.

After Wittnauer bought Touchon, the "J" bridge or bosun's whistle form showed up in some large Agassiz torpedo boat watches. Eventually Longines bought Wittnauer and Touchon Longines and Agassiz were under the same ownership.

I had not seen the 21 Jewel Touchon or the 17Jewel Agassiz variants.
 

Jerry Treiman

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Just one more comment, i think this two Touchons, and the Agassiz is very similar to these.
I would not be very surprised if it turns out, that originally both types of LeCoutre ebauche ;-)
Once when i get to the LeCoultre factory Heritage Gallery, i will check this!

View attachment 635878 View attachment 635879 View attachment 635880
For more on this particular ebauche, see this thread -- https://mb.nawcc.org/threads/this-g...vement-from-meylan-or-audemars-piguet.116387/
 

Dr. Jon

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As this thread shows the Bosun's whistle design was covered by a US patent. The key point of this patent is that the assignee was Wittnauer.
 
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