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Unusual Silas Hoadley Tall Case

JDCKent

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Jul 16, 2011
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An elderly antiques dealer who I occasionally do work for recently let me have this clock as partial payment for restoration work I had done for him on his other clocks. I knew of Silas Hoadley, mainly with regards to his pillar and scroll clocks. I was intrigued by the case design and also the artwork on the dial. I was able to get the 30-hour w/w movement to run and keep good time. I’ve got the clock in storage for the short term. Here are a few photos. Sorry, no pics of the movement yet. One finial is detached, but still with the clock. Thankfully it doesn’t need much work to the case or movement. Has anyone ever come across a case like this?

76811E4B-6D2B-4BD5-B6C8-4E0064D22428.jpeg D1935D32-6B07-4FA3-AC3E-8E080305DEB1.jpeg 9162BE67-BC19-4C3F-85EA-68B361C174B5.jpeg B415EA2F-71D8-4942-9AFF-059A5E197B20.jpeg 436C2189-BF39-4032-BC21-D3151D193817.jpeg A6EFFFC8-F1FD-4796-BEFD-64381FE2C37C.jpeg 6C664A4C-BBB4-48E4-B043-99E80D95016A.jpeg
 
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Burkhard Rasch

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cannot answer Your questions but wanted to express my admiration to the wonderfull mansonic dial !Great piece and in lovely condition !
Congrats!
Burkhard
 
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JDCKent

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Yes, that dial is what really caught my attention. I didn’t realize until reading a little more about Hoadley that he was a high standing and respected Freemason.
 

James Gardner

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Apr 5, 2010
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Hi,

Very nice and usual design elements to this case. Many times the clock maker or clock peddler would sell the movement, dial and weights to the buyer and then the buyer would have a local furniture maker make the case. Worth considering that that is the case here (no pun intended).
 

JDCKent

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Jul 16, 2011
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Hi,

Very nice and usual design elements to this case. Many times the clock maker or clock peddler would sell the movement, dial and weights to the buyer and then the buyer would have a local furniture maker make the case. Worth considering that that is the case here (no pun intended).
I’m sure you’re right, James.That was my thought exactly when I first saw the clock and understanding from what I’d read that this was often the ‘case’ with many of these of movements during the period. I fell in love with all the design elements of the clock when dealer who I’d been working for showed it to me at his shop. He was under the assumption I think from the individual he’d bought it from that it wasn’t in working order. So I removed the hood and took a look at the movement and sure enough it was only a misaligned escapement that was the issue. I figured for four bill’s worth of labor for some other work I’d done for him it seemed like a no-brainer.
Here’s another Hoadley tall case I found online that came up for auction last year at Sotheby's with a very similar Masonic dial but this one has an unusual paint decorated case.
20BE5FC0-2EB6-42F9-B40A-2C750B8AFD1E.jpeg
 

Jim DuBois

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I think you will find much of your case to have many 20th century "improvements." Unfortunately, these enhancements do not add to the styling of a tall clock in the opinion of many. Also, the case has been skinned of all original surfaces where apparently original but skinned wood is now seen. Like the photo of the painted case just above, most of the woodworks tall clocks were painted, when the original wood was pine or poplar. Where cherry, walnut, maple, or lesser common hardwoods were used, they were sometimes painted, other times not. Your dial is extremely nice.
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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Nov 26, 2009
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I’m sure you’re right, James.That was my thought exactly when I first saw the clock and understanding from what I’d read that this was often the ‘case’ with many of these of movements during the period. I fell in love with all the design elements of the clock when dealer who I’d been working for showed it to me at his shop. He was under the assumption I think from the individual he’d bought it from that it wasn’t in working order. So I removed the hood and took a look at the movement and sure enough it was only a misaligned escapement that was the issue. I figured for four bill’s worth of labor for some other work I’d done for him it seemed like a no-brainer.
Here’s another Hoadley tall case I found online that came up for auction last year at Sotheby's with a very similar Masonic dial but this one has an unusual paint decorated case.
View attachment 683360
It's a decorative technique using a lit candle or lamp called smoke graining!

It was used extensively on furniture, boxes, etc. in the 19th century. Often rendered on a yellow or white background for full effect.

To me, beautiful and apparently to others as well. The presence of a well preserved decorated surface like that increases the value of a clock like that from maybe a few hundred for an example with a skinned case to many thousands. Helps it to transcend being just a clock to something special. And to think there are people who have stripped cases like that and others to show the "beauty of the wood" or some other nonsense.

Besides tall case clocks, may be found on shelf clocks. Here's an example on a miniature Terry ww:

terry miniature ww.jpg

Jerome used it on the interior of his early flat pilaster and scroll clocks. Here's the interior of the door frame and the back board:

jerome case interior.jpg

By the way, I think the case on the subject clock has some merit. There's little doubt in my mind that the case is not in its original state, surface and otherwise. May even be a later complete recasing. I suspect the handy work of a probably amateur Victorian period wood worker which achieved a decorative effect turnings. There's a Victorian fussiness about it. I especially like the molding along the bottom of the hood and the shaping of the skirt.

Sorry for the hijack.

RM
 
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Jim DuBois

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And the makers of Ives mirror clock cases also used smoked paint interiors along with vinegar spotting on some and regular brushwork on others. Jerome and Ives worked together from about 1816 until ? so having similar approaches on finishes is not surprising.

0130shives_det1_sm.jpg 0504ives_det_1_sm.jpg 0623twknow_det2.jpg H0013-L71777522.jpg IMG_4572.JPG
 

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