Unknown lathe and marking

Discussion in 'Horological Tools' started by karlmansson, Mar 18, 2019.

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  1. karlmansson

    karlmansson Registered User

    Apr 20, 2013
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    Hello!

    Can anyone tell me the maker of this lathe? The monogram looks so familiar yet I can't put my finger on what it is. Maybe it's because it's so Close to the Schaublin logo.

    Best regards
    Karl

    00415939_2.jpg
     
  2. doc_fields

    doc_fields Registered User

    Sep 29, 2004
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    Hi Karl;
    I didn't have much to do tonight, and when I saw your post, I thought I'd try to help out. Tried using Google to search out a similar image, but to no avail. Then I went here: Lathes + Machine Tool Archive and looked for awhile through his database. I only searched German, Swiss, a little Austrian I think, but still came up with no match. I used those countries to research, because the green/jade color of the paint was similar to one I had painted, then later sold. I was told that industrial machine color was regulated at least in Germany, and that's why I searched those countries.

    I did find one, "Saupe" in the list, with one lathe having a very close base style as yours. That's about the best I came up with tonight, maybe others might have better luck. Nice looking lathe, though!.............................gary
     
  3. DeweyC

    DeweyC Registered User
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    Feb 5, 2007
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    Cute Karl.

    If you have access, did you look under the castings and on the sliderest? It looks like some of the oddball stuff in DeCarle but that just leads to speculation.

    With the Soviet occupation, I would not even hazard a guess as to era.
     
  4. wefalck

    wefalck Registered User

    Mar 29, 2011
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    I know, me too, I have seen the logo before, but just can't think of a manufacturer ... :( Tony Griffith's Web-site and Carlè's book didn't turn up something useful.

    The 'standard' colour for German machine tools was 'reseda green', RAL 6011: RAL 6011 Resedagrün (RAL Classic) | RALfarbpalette.de
     
  5. karlmansson

    karlmansson Registered User

    Apr 20, 2013
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    I hope you mean the lathe :D
    The lathe is not mine but part of asking this was thinking it migh become mine. It's at a local auction house in my old home town, my father had a look at it for me today. It's an 8mm lathe but there is no marking in regards to name in any place where he could see it. It comes with no other accessories and I'm pretty set up with my Lorch 6mm lathes. I could use milling attachments and whatnot with this one as well but for collets I'd have to stock up a set. I just recently got myself equipped with a larger lathe (see below) and I'm not really sure how I could motivate having this one. It's 40cm bed length though so not too large. I like the robustness of the bed arrangement and corresponding headstock. Looks like a small SV70.


    Thank you wefalck! You may not have solved this mystery but you've solved another one! I got myself a used Habegger DLZTE lathe a few weeks back. The paint job was atrocious so I decided to strip it. Some of the parts were still in the original color though (did I mention the paint job was atrocious?) and it looks very much like the reseda green you linked to! Maybe a little bit darker and greyer but that might just be my screen. I think this lathe is from the 1950s.

    It came with a pretty decent range of collets, down to 1mm, so I'm thinking that lathe once I'm done with the fixin' uppin' will serve me well down to the sizes where my Lorch lathes can take over.

    Thanks for contributing to everyone!

    Best regards
    Karl
     
  6. wefalck

    wefalck Registered User

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    The Swiss used a similar (or the same ?) green on their (larger) machine tools. I remember this from my university days at the ETH in Zürich in the late 1970s, where we had a workshop for the students that was equipped with cast-off high-quality Swiss machines - unfortunately, I didn't know anything about manufacturers then. On the other hand, Schaublin was always painted in a blueish grey, while Dixi used a blueish green and Bergeon a cream colour. I thought that Habeggers were painted like Schaublin ones. Mikron where painted in a kind of silver.

    Personally, I was never fond of this reseda-green, it looked too much like 'work' :) For my machines I opted for a (historically incorrect) 'bottle-green', RAL 6007 (RAL 6007 Flaschengrün (RAL Classic) | RALfarbpalette.de), which is soothing to the eyes and looks nice together with polished steel and brass.
     
  7. karlmansson

    karlmansson Registered User

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    Well, “like work” to me is either white or surgical light blue. So that’s not really a problem for me :). Thanks again!

    Karl
     
  8. karlmansson

    karlmansson Registered User

    Apr 20, 2013
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    Didn’t get the lathe, decided I have what I need. But then, not two days after that one sold, this one pops up on an online auction. Now I want to know just for the sake of knowing!

    EAFEBF80-0263-4C30-9680-6E65E551DFD1.jpeg
     
  9. karlmansson

    karlmansson Registered User

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    wefalck, do you have a suggestion for a suitable paint for these machines? I'm looking for a high gloss, hard finish paint that will be self levelling and yeild a decent result with a sponge roller or paint brush.

    Best regards
    Karl
     
  10. wefalck

    wefalck Registered User

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    Karl, that's a not so easy question. You obviously can't burn the paint in. Some people use 2-component lacquers, but they are not very convenient to use though probably tougher than other option. Personally, I settled for some kind of industrial acrylic paint for two reasons: one was that my favourit green, the RAL 6007, wasn't available in another format and the second the convenience of handling acrylics - you don't need to mess around with solvents, brushes and air-brushes can be cleaned with water and soap.

    I have used both, spray-cans and a simple air-brush. Mohair-brushes give good results too, but are not so eay to use on complex shapes, such as lathe parts. With acrylics one also needs to work fast, so some form of spray-painting is the best option.

    I use an automotive primer underneath and/or a filler-primer, depending on how rough the casting is. On my Dixi mill I needed a lot of putty, as I made the mistake of taking off the factory putty - and they had used a lot. If the old putty is sound, leave it on.

    Living in a rented appartment, I have to do the spraying on the balcony. I use a cardboard box as spray-booth to catch the overspray. The painting has to be done during a quiet day, with no wind and dust flying around. And it has to be above 15°C or so.

    The acrylic paint has stood up well as such in the oily environment of the milling machine over the past 18 years or so, when I did the refurbishment of the Dixi. The only problem was that the paint cracked over puttied area (see comments above). On the Wolf, Jahn & Co. milling machine, the paint still looks good after 15 years of heavy use.

    Eberhard
     
  11. karlmansson

    karlmansson Registered User

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    Thank you Eberhard!

    I realize that it’s not an easy question to answer, hence my question . I’m very happy you did though as we appear to have very similar circumstances. I did remove the old filler from a lot of the parts, the apron and the head- and tailstock. I’ve switched paint strippers now and hope that my new one is a bit less aggressive so that it won’t start working on the old filler. I didn’t dare leave the old filler once I saw that the stripper had softened it. The old filler has been knocked through in some places but I’ll fill that with some body filler.

    I’ll also have to resort to the balcony. I bought a small kids play tent from IKEA that I will tape up the holes in and use as a spray booth. It’s large enough for the smaller parts but not for the bed. The primer I’ll use is a spray but I think an acrylic paint may be a good alternative. Or maybe I’ll go with two component... A work life of 18 years sound promising though!

    Thank you for your input!

    Best regards
    Karl
     
  12. wefalck

    wefalck Registered User

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    Karl,
    By chance in an auction parts for the above WW-lathe popped up. The seller identified it as a Dutch Hazemeyer. Check Tony’s Web-site, it is there ... I knew, I once saw the logo there ...
    Regards,
    Eberhard
     
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  13. karlmansson

    karlmansson Registered User

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    YES! Finally :). Reading about it it sounds like it could have been a useful tool. A Little short on the accessories though. Thanks for solving this mystery Eberhard!

    Regards
    Karl
     

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