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Nickyjj272

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Jan 29, 2020
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Hi.
I'm new to the forum and I'm looking for some help to identify a mantel clock which I was given a few years ago. I know very little about clocks so please excuse me if I use the wrong terminology.
The clock is a wooden case mantel clock, I think the shape is a napoleon hat? There are art deco fan style molding on either side. It has a metal dial with raised numbers. There are 3 key holes in the dial and a chime - silent slot.
The mechanism is accessed from the back of the clock and appears to be brass coloured? The 5 'chime rods' are attached to a black metal frame.

There does not seem to be any makers marks on the clock face or mechanism. There are some numbers on the bottom of the case but they are written in pencil and may not be relevant at all.

As you can see from the pictures the clock is in quite a poor state of repair. The metal "bezel" is missing, the face is quite badly dented, the pendulum is missing and there are no keys. Also the mechanism seems to have become detached from the case.

Can anyone give me any ideas of its age and origin? I have searched countless pictures of similar clocks but found nothing that looks like this one.

Some Pictures attached, but if they are not enough I can take more.

20200129_175850.jpg 20200129_180112.jpg 20200129_175855.jpg 20200129_180102.jpg 20200129_180105.jpg 20200129_180108.jpg 20200129_175907.jpg 20200129_175922.jpg 20200129_180018.jpg 20200129_180021.jpg
 

Steven Thornberry

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Sure looks like a Gebr. Petersen clock. Below is an earlier thread showing a similar movement and providing a smattering on info. on the company in post 5.

Need help to ID a movement
 

J. A. Olson

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This is a typical 1930's Westminster chime mantel clock using a German Gebr. Petersen movement housed inside a British-domestic case. The gong block & rods are probably British. These cases came in all sorts of styles with Art Deco themes being particularly popular at the time. Wood construction is usually relegated to Oak or Walnut veneers but occasionally you find more ornate burr walnut or inlaid marquetry cases. No particular maker of movement was desired over another so there are several combinations of movements & cases out there. The case is somewhat derived from the classic 'tambour' outline but varies considerately in exact shape.

Your clock is missing some of the wood screws which hold the movement inside the case. The broken hands and bezel can be replaced but to its credit your clock doesn't look too bad. The case joints and curved veneer paneling appear to be intact.

They are nice clocks and tend to be good quality in all aspects. They were meant to be affordable for the working class but well made as to do timekeeping & chiming without any real setbacks. If it isn't feasible to restore immediately I'd suggest keeping the clock somewhere safe in the meantime - these types of clocks are not being made anymore and they never will be again.
 
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lpbp

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If you are really attached to it, find a competent clock repair person and get a quote, my guess with the bad dial it probably is not worth it.
 
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Nickyjj272

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If you are really attached to it, find a competent clock repair person and get a quote, my guess with the bad dial it probably is not worth it.
Thanks. I'm not sentimentally attached to it as I was given it by someone who didn't want it. I was more interested in the possible history behind it. Especially as I couldn't find any makers marks etc. It's been sat in my loft for a few years and will probably sit there for a few more. My 9 year old daughter was fascinated by the fact it was pre war as she has been learning about WW2 at school.
 
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Nickyjj272

New User
Jan 29, 2020
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47
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This is a typical 1930's Westminster chime mantel clock using a German Gebr. Petersen movement housed inside a British-domestic case. The gong block & rods are probably British. These cases came in all sorts of styles with Art Deco themes being particularly popular at the time. Wood construction is usually relegated to Oak or Walnut veneers but occasionally you find more ornate burr walnut or inlaid marquetry cases. No particular maker of movement was desired over another so there are several combinations of movements & cases out there. The case is somewhat derived from the classic 'tambour' outline but varies considerately in exact shape.

Your clock is missing some of the wood screws which hold the movement inside the case. The broken hands and bezel can be replaced but to its credit your clock doesn't look too bad. The case joints and curved veneer paneling appear to be intact.

They are nice clocks and tend to be good quality in all aspects. They were meant to be affordable for the working class but well made as to do timekeeping & chiming without any real setbacks. If it isn't feasible to restore immediately I'd suggest keeping the clock somewhere safe in the meantime - these types of clocks are not being made anymore and they never will be again.
Thanks for the detailed response. I really appreciate the information. I will certainly hang on to it. My 9 year old daughter was fascinated by the fact that it was pre WW2. Our house was built in the 30's too and narrowly missed being bombed.
As you say the case is in good condition. It's just the missing bezel and broken hands. The face is a bit battered too, but it adds character!
I might try and find a key to see if the mechanism still works!

Thanks again
 

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