Unique Movement Holder

sjaffe

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Dec 25, 2012
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Santa Rosa,CA
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Hello All,

An old clockmaker gave me a movement holder some time ago that I thought was junk. But one day I used it and after cleaning it up and attaching a new wood base, it became my favorite. Unfortunately it was lost in the fire along with all my other tools. I would like to recreate this, but I have not found any photos on the web so far. I will describe it and perhaps someone out there might have one and can take some photos and provide some measurements.

The base is a piece of wood about 6"x10"x3/4". Attached is a piece of aluminum channel. It is possibly made from rectangular tubing with a slot cut the length down the middle. There are two T nuts that runs inside the channel. Each T nut holds down a piece of metal that is rectangular cross section, about 1/8" x 1/2". The piece is bent in a U shape. The bends are square corners. The middle section is vertical and the two end sections are parallel to the base. The bottom section has a hole that ties in with the T nut in the channel. You can slide these two pieces along the channel to accommodate the width of the movement.

The top section has another piece that acts as a clamp to hold the movement. There are two screws in this top piece. One is to clamp the movement plate and the other is opposite the end where the movement is so that the piece clamps parallel to the movement plate (adjustable for different movement plate thicknesses).

If you cannot picture it from my description, then you probably don't have one. But if you do, I would greatly appreciate some measurements and photos so I can make a replacement. I imagine this was something sold by clock suppliers back perhaps in the 1960's, but I'm only guessing. If it helps, the one I had had red plastic knobs with knurled edges to facilitate tightening in the channel at the bottom and to hold the movement at the top. I have used the individual leg movement holders, but what I liked about this one was that I could easily flip from front to back without having to mess with the four legs.

I had a Parker movement test stand. These are expensive, but I just loved the one I lost so I ended up buying another used one on eBay. The way the clamps work is similar to the holder I described above, but the Parker is a test stand and the one I'm trying to recreate is more a holder for working on a movement.

Thanks for your help,
Stan
 

wow

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Jun 24, 2008
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If you could draw a picture of what you are looking for it would be much easier for us to understand. Even if it is a rough drawing, “a picture is worth a thousand words”.
 

sjaffe

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Dec 25, 2012
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You are correct. Here is my attempt at drawing this. Don't over-analyzer it, I'm not much of an artist. It's just to provide a better idea of what it looked like. Thanks.

MovementHolder.jpg
 

Altashot

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Oct 12, 2017
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Looks like you might be able to fabricate something with “T-Tracks”
7D7BA86B-D00B-4EE3-A81F-ADC47C3A92A1.jpeg

Often used in woodworking, they can be used for all sorts of jigs.

M.
 

sjaffe

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Dec 25, 2012
459
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Santa Rosa,CA
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I had a vague remembrance of these, but what I had recalled was just a U shaped extrusion to fit a miter bar. Yes, this looks like a good basis for the track portion. I would just need to come up with the upper pieces. The original just had a single piece that was bent in the sideways U shape. I'm thinking of something more machined than bent up.
 

shutterbug

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It looks like something you could make fairly easily. Unless you get fortunate and find one on Ebay or something, you won't find one like it any more.
 

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Rockford's early high grade movements by Greg Frauenhoff