Unexpected Things in Watches

Discussion in 'Wrist Watches' started by Mike Kearney, Mar 9, 2001.

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  1. Mike Kearney

    Mike Kearney Guest

    I like collecting watches because you never know what you'll find when you open them up. Like some movement you've never seen before, or an ebauche you wouldn't have expected in a no-name case.

    Here's one that really got me recently. It's an Evkob, a not so special Swiss movement in a badly worn base metal case from the '20s, maybe '30s:
    http://www.netstorm.net/~armillary/evkob1.JPG

    I opened the back to check out the movement, a 15 jewel Monarch, which is in pretty good shape considering... and then I saw the picture in the case back:
    http://www.netstorm.net/~armillary/evkob2.JPG

    This young lady has probably been in this watch for 70 years. Spooky.

    Anybody found anything else unexpected in watch cases?

    Regards,
    Mike
     
  2. Mike Kearney

    Mike Kearney Guest

    I like collecting watches because you never know what you'll find when you open them up. Like some movement you've never seen before, or an ebauche you wouldn't have expected in a no-name case.

    Here's one that really got me recently. It's an Evkob, a not so special Swiss movement in a badly worn base metal case from the '20s, maybe '30s:
    https://mb.nawcc.org/

    I opened the back to check out the movement, a 15 jewel Monarch, which is in pretty good shape considering... and then I saw the picture in the case back:
    https://mb.nawcc.org/

    This young lady has probably been in this watch for 70 years. Spooky.

    Anybody found anything else unexpected in watch cases?

    Regards,
    Mike
     
  3. Tom Huber

    Tom Huber Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 9, 2000
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    I've come across pictures inside pocket watch cases, but this would be a first for me to find a pic in a ww. Tom
     
  4. doug sinclair

    doug sinclair Registered User

    Aug 27, 2000
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    Mike,

    I recently had an auction house send me a paper weight with a timepiece in it that they wanted an opinion on before it was offered for sale. It was in the form of an acrylic sphere, or rather two half-spheres, hinged together with metal frames to form a sphere. The face within the sphere read "Railroad Timekeeper". I flipped it over to see a Russian made, jewelled wrist watch movement of about 11 1/2 lignes. Upon taking it out of the case, I discovered rhat the dial was a black and white photograph of the face of (I assume) a larger bogus railroad pocket watch dial, crudely cut into what only approximated a circle with what appeared to be blunt scissors. It was crudely glued on over the original dial. I put it back together and returned it to the auction house with the note that it probably shouldn't be offered for sale at the reserve price of $ 250.00 (Cdn.)

    This particular auction house also sent me a gent's Tudor wrist wastch in a non-Oyster case. I opened it to find an AS 1187 movement in it! Guess what! Same consignor! The auction house indicated that they had experienced many problems with this particular consignor's offerings in the past, and that he was CUT OFF!

    I was asked by a friend to go to an auction preview to look at a gent's Patek Phillipe wrist watch in an 18 karat yellow gold case. The dial was a gilt colour with a waffle-like texture, and the printing looked to be somewhat less distinct than I thought the dial on a Patek should be. The rest of the watch looked legit, I thought. I don't remember what sort of a ridiculous reserve the watch had on it, but I advised my friend to offer no more than $ 800.00 (Cdn.) as an absentee bid. The auction was due to start any moment as we left the auction rooms. As we left, I told my friend that it was too bad we couldn't check the movement before we made the absentee bid. He said, "Sure we can"! We went back in and popped the back to see, wait for it,----- a Russian made, jewelled movement! The bid was withdrawn! The auctioneer didn't even get a nibble at
    $ 250.00 so he withdrew it! Whew! I coulda looked bad on THAT one.

    Years ago, I had a lady bring me her watch which had stopped. I opened it and found a long fiber inside the case which was a sort of heather-green colour. I commented on her "heather green" wool sweater (which she was NOT wearing), and she asked me how I knew she had one! The thread caught on the crown during winding and had worked its way into the case.

    Regards,
    Doug S.

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