Typical run time for Vincenti portico?

T.Cu

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Sep 26, 2020
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Hello Everyone, I am wondering about the run time for my new Vincenti clock.
After cleaning it up, it ran for twelve days the first winding, then an (amazing to me) nineteen days the second winding.
I am guessing that after being utrasounded and then oiled, the clock first ran well, and then ran better after the oil got spread around better?
But isn't nineteen days really long for an "eight day" clock? I was thinking I'd heard somewhere of fourteen day clock movements like these? Wondering if this could be one?
Thanks in Advance, Tim

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leeinv66

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It is not uncommon for these French Roulant movements to run for 12 to 14 days. However, it has been my experience that their time keeping becomes quite poor over the last third of that run time. But then, I have 8 day American mass produced clocks that will run for ten days. I would still consider this an 8 day movement even though it it can run longer. But I am interested to hear what others think.
 

Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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I would say that it is common for a French clock to run 2 weeks, some more, some less.

Wind it with two fingers and don't try so much to wind it up tight. Some don't like to be wound up tight.

On many French clocks, the outer spring holes are often on the verge of tearing out. I don't even like to run a French clock, unless I know the springs are in good shape. The springs are of the very highest quality but at only 10 to 11 thou, they won't tolerate any abuse or accidents.

A common accident happens when one person winds the clock up tight and another person comes by a short while later an cranks the key, thinking it needs winding. ZIP, BAM, more job security for us clockies. This probably won't happen, if the clock is never wound up tight.

My 2, Willie X
 

T.Cu

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Good stuff to know. Hmm, I will be a little more careful when winding the French ones than I have been in the past. Thanks very much for the responses.
 

Salsagev

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Good stuff to know. Hmm, I will be a little more careful when winding the French ones than I have been in the past. Thanks very much for the responses.
In my French clock, the springs are pretty tired because they were wound and not running.
In my other French clock, the spring runs down because the movement runs without the pendulum. That runs quite awhile.
 

T.Cu

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I always think it's a good sign when one of my clocks runs "quicktime", ie, fast, without a pendulum. Like when I am working on it on the stand. I always think it might mean they are in peak form.
(Or, that the particular length of the leader just happens to provide enough back-snap to keep the thing going..)
But I think most of mine require a bob of some type to stay running for very long.

I have been thinking I will no longer wind my French clocks all the way up, even though I do wind carefully. I will wind them just almost all the way up. Maybe just past "snug" or something. Maybe all the way to "firm" ha ha.
 
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jmclaugh

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One of my pendule de Paris movements will run for 17 days on a single wind. I wind it fully every fortnight (9 turns) and it keeps time well over that period to within about 20 seconds.
 

T.Cu

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Seems like a good plan for mine too, every fourteen days would work well.
And also, learn the number of turns, although I count by "half turns" (180*) just for my own convenience.
I just read an interesting old post here about what "eight days" means for different people. I was thinking just "every Sunday" or something like that was "eight days", but others get more specific, including the time of day.
In my personal entries about each clock I have, I think I will start including the approximate number of winds the clock will happily take, when run down. And other information, like how stiff each spring is, or other characteristics. Useful and fun bits of information. Thanks for the idea.
 

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