Trivia time-what’s this for?

Nookster

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I bought an old watchmakers bench that belonged to Bill Beers from Modesto, CA dated March 1936. Lots of fun stuff in here that I have no idea what they are used for?

can anyone tell me what this is for?

94983EC3-4240-4E96-9ADD-C0CC24819E7A.jpeg D12B20B8-9DA2-4E9B-8A50-3DCDE6F06799.jpeg 0C84ED02-A935-48A6-B8F9-0DFB837EFAEC.jpeg
 

Nookster

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Thanks Dave. I’m sure it’s in a drawer and I will look for it.

I saw one for sale online and saw the parts I am missing, will make them easier to find.
 
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4thdimension

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Numbering would help but, taken in order from the top I can I.D. a few of them. First row left- douzieme gauge, right- tool stand (possibly for the next items?), row2 left- hole closing punches( I think), right-I don’t know. row 3- left- built like a jewel hole gauge but it isn’t, perhaps a depth gauge? right- drafting pens, row 4 left- hole punch. The next two are too hard to see but the last tool is for bending hunting case lids to help them close, but, as recently discussed in another thread these are not easily used and can actually do harm to the case. I have found them useful in antique toy repairs though. -Cort
 
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Dave Coatsworth

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I was at first confused by Cort's answer until I realized he must be looking at the photos on a smaller screen. So, yes numbering photos would help when there's a bunch. I agree with Cort on all that he identified. I'll add the pliers that are second to last look like stone setter's pliers, but the jaws are a little dark and hard to see.
 
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Nookster

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OK, we can call photos in order-Again thanks for the help

#1 Douzieme gauge,
#2 Tool Holders
#3 Brevet Tools-used for?
#4 Fisner-Vice-used for?
#5 Levin Guage-Used for?
#6 Two tweezer looking with screw down-used for?
#7 Plyers with a pin going down the center of the claws-used for?
#8 Plyers with two notches at tip
#9 Plyers with large offset tips
#10 Same basic looking as #9
 

gmorse

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Hi Nookster,

#1, the douzieme gauge, is a measuring tool calibrated in twelfths of an old French inch, (or 'lignes'). These were also made with metric scales, and can be surprisingly accurate.

#6 are drafting pens, used for drawing lines in ink, superseded by Rotring type pens, (and ultimately CAD), and nothing to do with horology.

Regards,

Graham
 

PatH

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#6 are drafting pens, used for drawing lines in ink, superseded by Rotring type pens, (and ultimately CAD), and nothing to do with horology.
Could these be used for inking numbers or lettering on clocks? I can't really tell what size the nibs are, but just wondered if that could have been the horological use. (Having said that, I've definitely learned that just because something was found in a box of horological "stuff" doesn't mean it's horologically related. :))
 

Jim Haney

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Number 6 are used for holding Roller jewels to fit them in the roller table.
 

gmorse

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Hi Pat,

Yes, I suppose they could be used for that, probably with Indian ink.

Regards,

Graham
 

John Matthews

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Yes, I suppose they could be used for that, probably with Indian ink
Graham - I'm not sure that they could be used for lettering. I used these for my classes in 'O' level Technical and Geometrical Drawing in the 1960's. From what I remember they could only be used successfully for producing straight lines against a straight edge. They could have been used with a stencil to create the outline, by maintaining the flat side against a template.

#7 - could be a leather punch
#8 - are the notches, semi-circular in profile? - could be pliers to holding the end of a thin bar

John
 
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DeweyC

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OK, we can call photos in order-Again thanks for the help

#1 Douzieme gauge,
#2 Tool Holders
#3 Brevet Tools-used for?
#4 Fisner-Vice-used for?
#5 Levin Guage-Used for?
#6 Two tweezer looking with screw down-used for?
#7 Plyers with a pin going down the center of the claws-used for?
#8 Plyers with two notches at tip
#9 Plyers with large offset tips
#10 Same basic looking as #9
No. 5 is indeed a Levin Depth/length micrometer. I have had two and both times found it fairly useless when a set of feeler gauges or a microscope measurement reticle can be used. OTOH, these are aggressively sought after by tool collectors.
 

gmorse

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Hi John,
I'm not sure that they could be used for lettering. I used these for my classes in 'O' level Technical and Geometrical Drawing in the 1960's. From what I remember they could only be used successfully for producing straight lines against a straight edge. They could have been used with a stencil to create the outline, by maintaining the flat side against a template.
Yes, I was thinking they could be used for Roman numerals but not for Arabic. They had to be inked carefully or the ink could run onto the ruler; a Rotring was much easier!

Regards,

Graham
 
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PatH

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I haven't inked many dials, but I used India ink, Rapidograph pen (same as a Rotring?), a straightedge for numbers (because my hand isn't that steady), and a compass for chapter rings to ink Roman numeral dials. I've never tried a fountain or calligraphy pen.

The tools pictured in #6 can be found on ebay as vintage drafting tools made in Germany. The little wheel is a roller.
 

PatH

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Interesting - the tip looks different on the watch tools from the ones shown in drafting sets. I wonder if the same maker produced both.
 

John Matthews

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The little wheel is a roller.
Pat - Nor sure what you mean.

The little wheel is the knurled head of a screw. The screw is used to adjust the separation between the two nibs. This allows for cleaning when they are fully open and it is possible (with considerable care) to adjust the width of the line to a limited extent - too open and all the ink discharges onto the surface being worked upon.

1660745908009.png

John
 
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Skutt50

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The tools in the ebay ad are used for replacing rubbed in jewels.

The tool in picture #6 are the same that I have in some old drawing sets.

I guess they could be used to hold jewels but I think they originally were made for drawing........
 
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Bob Murray

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#4 is a hose clamp, usually used in the lab. Probably marked Fisher.
 

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