Tool rest for Sherline

shimmystep

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Anyone know of an alternative maker for a tool rest to the one sherline sell for their lathe? Which I think is very expensive personally.
TIA
 

emhitch

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I wonder if you could adapt this Taig lathe tool rest to the Sherline lathe. It is available here in the US for $27.80 USD. 1038.jpg Just a thought.
 

davestanda

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someone on this forum , i don't remember who but they made their own tool rest for a sherline ...try searching for it
 

shimmystep

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Thanks gents. The Taig rest conversion is food for thought, will have to check out the bed dimensions, but it would be a good starting point.
I found the thread you mentioned davestanda, looks like a good piece of work, I'm looking to 'skin this cat' with less work though!
 

davestanda

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less work would be , like i also saw a pick on this forum,a gentlemen just used his tool holder and a uncut lathe tool bit and used that like a t rest...
 

Jerry Kieffer

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Anyone know of an alternative maker for a tool rest to the one sherline sell for their lathe? Which I think is very expensive personally.
TIA
Shimmystep
Actually mounting a typical WW watchmakers lathe rest to a Sherline Lathe would probably be the least expensive and require the least amount of effort.

All that is required is a bridge across the bottom of the bed, two "T" bolts and knurled mounting nuts per the first attached photo.

The second photo shows the assembly mounted on a typical rest.

Jerry Kieffer
 

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shimmystep

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Shimmystep
Actually mounting a typical WW watchmakers lathe rest to a Sherline Lathe would probably be the least expensive and require the least amount of effort.

All that is required is a bridge across the bottom of the bed, two "T" bolts and knurled mounting nuts per the first attached photo.

The second photo shows the assembly mounted on a typical rest.

Jerry Kieffer
Thanks Jerry, looks like a very good solution, I'll keep my eye open for a used flip over.
 

wefalck

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Mar 29, 2011
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A bit off topic: I would find the normal position of the Sherline on the bench a bit low for graver work, unless, perhaps, you put it very close to the edge of the bench ...

Yes, I always wondered, why they sell the T-rest for the Sherline at such horrendous price. What is so special about it.

wefalck
 

Jerry Kieffer

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A bit off topic: I would find the normal position of the Sherline on the bench a bit low for graver work, unless, perhaps, you put it very close to the edge of the bench ...

Yes, I always wondered, why they sell the T-rest for the Sherline at such horrendous price. What is so special about it.

wefalck
Wefalck
You bring up a couple of good points that leads to other thoughts that should be considered as part of this thread.

The Sherline graver rest was designed by WR Smith who is a true master with a graver.

The up side is that it is a high quality rest with the rest itself being properly tempered allowing controlled quality work not always found on those supplied on watchmakers lathes.

The down side is that many do not like the fact that it is not a flip down rest. I suspect the high cost relates to its quality and that it is a limited production item.

The Sherline Lathe spindle center line is about 1.5" lower than the typical watchmakers lathe per your observation. Personally, I am far from a master with a graver, but have not found this to be a issue in actual use.

On the other hand, a machine tool lathe such as a Sherline while of course possible, is not designed for graver use much like a watchmakers lathe is not designed for machine tool procedures.

The larger required robust headstock on machine tool lathes can limit graver movement and angles when working next to the spindle nose on small diameters. Personally, I get a "Boxed in feeling" as compared to the small diameter headstock and wide open access of a watchmakers lathe spindle when working with a graver.

However, if one spends their time mastering machine tool practices on a proper machine tool lathe per horological manufacturing procedures, your capability and versatility will be far greater than with a watchmakers Lathe.

Jerry Kieffer
 

shimmystep

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Thanks for the input gents.

I turned a new brass knob for a regulator movement bracket on the sherline a few weeks back and found the same 'boxed in' feeling, though what didn't help this was I using the tool post and a tempered piece of stock.
I did the major material removal on the Sherline and fine finished it on the Lorch. Not wanting to put the pressure caused by more aggressive material removal on the cones bearings of the Lorch.
 

Jerry Kieffer

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Thanks for the input gents.

I turned a new brass knob for a regulator movement bracket on the sherline a few weeks back and found the same 'boxed in' feeling, though what didn't help this was I using the tool post and a tempered piece of stock.
I did the major material removal on the Sherline and fine finished it on the Lorch. Not wanting to put the pressure caused by more aggressive material removal on the cones bearings of the Lorch.
My "boxed in comment" was in reference to using a graver on the Sherline lathe or any small machine tool lathe for that matter.

Many horologist get into trouble when attempting to use traditional published/taught horological repair practices (Not manufacturing) on machine tool lathes such as Sherline and others.
On a machine tool Lathe, the tool post mounted lathe tool is designed to be controlled by hand wheels thus no obstruction exists.
When turning complicated shapes, free hand random shapes are of course easily formed with a graver.
However when duplicating an existing shape, even the masters can have issues.
On a machine tool Lathe, mastering the art of positioning and utilizing all cutting surfaces of a lathe tool allows one to also form shapes using hand wheels.
While the shape itself may be a little slower than with a graver, duplication of diameters, spacings and angles can be much faster and more precise. Once shaped the tool post is then removed to open up a work space for final polishing or whatever.
The attached photo shows a students first attempt at an exact duplication of a finial, machined using the cutting surfaces of a AR-4 and E-4 brazed carbide tools and hand wheels.

Machine tool Lathes are also designed for the loads required for the use of easily ground form tooling making multiple exact shapes quickly and efficiently.

At some of the model engineering shows, one person has been making tiny complicated Goblets and passing them out as part of a Machine tool Lathe demo using form tooling. The internal and external detail is typically machined in less than 60 seconds.

While there is no right or wrong way to do something if it can be accomplished per ones satisfaction, many times there are more efficient methods if one is willing to explore them.

Jerry Kieffer
 

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shimmystep

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My "boxed in comment" was in reference to using a graver on the Sherline lathe or any small machine tool lathe for that matter.

Thanks Jerry, as ever, detailed and insightful discourse.
As ever I prob didn't explain myself very well. I was in fact using a graver, with a tool post ans cutting tool as a rest, which gave little room, hence boxed in.
 

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