Tool and equipment pointers needed

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by bikerclockguy, Aug 9, 2017.

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  1. bikerclockguy

    bikerclockguy Registered User

    Jul 22, 2017
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    View attachment 352999

    1. First question: will this type spring winder do a passable job for a beginner?

    2. Let-down tool: Just looking for a recommendation of brand or style that's basic and inexpensive

    3 Bushings: I found a clock that I'm going to do my first open-heart surgery on; hopefully I picked wisely. It's a Sessions strike movement, and it looks simple, open and accessible. So, what I want to know, is what size bushings am I likely to need on this clock. Timesavers has several assortments in brass or bronze, and in varying size ranges. If I'm likely to only need a couple of sizes, I might just opt to buy individual packs of those; especially if there are 2 or 3 common sizes needed for most jobs. And for installing them...I know the basic principles; I was just wondering if anyone had recommendations on basic jigs or tools. I've used both a C-clamp and a pair of vise-grips along with a 5/16 nut to brad master links on motorcycle chains, and a C-clamp was what came immediately to mind for clock bushings. I realize that I am dealing with a softer metal in a situation where accuracy is critical, though, and I can imagine that a bushing that was cocked even the slightest bit would cause some major issues. So, what did you guys start out with on your first bushing job?

    For those who are offering advice, this is important to bear in mind: I don't have a workshop, or even a workbench, to speak of. I live in an apartment complex and my kitchen table is my clock shop. All that will change in the next couple of years, as I plan to buy a house on some acreage, and at that point I'll be ready ot set up a well-appointed shop for cars, clocks and motorcycles. For now though, everything has to be hand-held or portable. View attachment 353007 This is the movement I plan to start with.
     
  2. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    That tool is pretty much useless.
    You can use the movements frame as a winder. All you need is the retainer clips, a length of soft iron wire (to attach the mainwheel to the frame) and a letdown tool. Actually you can use the soft iron wire in place of the retainer clips if you wish.
    I think that all of this may have already been mentioned on the last thread? Maybe someone has a photo of this setup.
    Willie X
     
  3. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

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    I have one of those mainspring winders (I suspect everyone has) but I've never used it. For your first clock, you may not need one: just wind the clock and let the springs down into one of those C-clamps (I like the flattish kind) or else wind some steel wire (the Dollar Tree has some) around the wound-up springs several times and twist it securely. Then let the mainsprings down. This will render the clock harmless.

    As for a let-down tool, you can take an 8" piece of 1/2" PVC pipe and saw a slit in its end parallel to the pipe's axis. The slit should be wide enough so you can slip the wings of the clock's winding key such that the barrel of the key sticks out of the end of the pipe. Then tape the key in place, and you've got a pretty good let-down tool.

    For most American clocks, I use KWM bronze bushings with inner diameters between 1.0 mm and 1.9 mm in steps of 0.1 mm. These will fit the hole made by a #3 KWM reamer, which I use in my old drill press. As for bushing height, it's generally better to use short ones so you don't have to trim them off. I'd measure the thickness of your Sessions clock plates and order bushings close to that height. That'll make nine sizes of bushings; I store mine in a pill container that has individual little lids for each day of the week, morning and evening. Make labels. I think you'll find that this is cheaper and more efficient than the bushing assortments they sell; at least that's my experience.

    My favorite bushing insertion tools are (1) a pair of Pakistani parallel-jaw pliers with smooth jaws purchased through eBay for maybe sixteen bucks and (2) a pair of very small welding Vise-Grip pliers I got at Harbor Freight Tools for maybe three bucks. These have pads on the jaws that swivel so they'll lie flat against the plate. When inserting bushings with pliers make sure there's nothing on the other side of the plate that you might crush, like a lever that swings in the way. Shouldn't be a problem with your Sessions.
    The parallel-jaw pliers work very well for seating bushings near the edge of the plate, which many are.

    While you're at it, buy some sort of a hand-held countersink to bevel off both the bushing bores and to de-burr the hole made by the bushing reamer. And buy some red and some blue thread locker, which can rescue you if you have a loose bushing and/or gear.

    You'll also want a set of bargain five-sided reamers from Timesavers or somewhere. The sizes should range from close to .3mm up to perhaps 4 or 5 mm, at least to start. And you'll need a pin vise to turn them. Don't buy anything made in Switzerland if you can help it: it's beautiful stuff, but Indian or Chinese tools will work fine.

    You'll have to file out holes to be bushed so that the hole you drill with the reamer is centered at the point where the pivot originally went through the plate. Timesavers has a set of really thin Chinese diamond rotary files that can be used either by hand or with a rotary tool for this purpose: it's Timesavers #29069 and they're four bucks for a set of ten.

    You'll also want a good task light. Any desk lamp will work; I have a gooseneck single-LED desk lamp from Ikea, ten bucks. Buy a jeweler's loupe wherever you can find one cheap; Timesavers and Harbor Freight have 'em.

    Lacking a drill press or bushing machine or milling machine, you'll probably find it easiest to drill bushing holes with a power screwdriver. Timesavers has the adapter for a KWM reamer; seven bucks, and make sure you drill the holes square to the plate. If they're tilted, the bushing bore will be tilted too, and you'll have to correct this with one of your five-sided reamers.

    For pivot polishing I've been using Timesavers emery buffs, 75 cents each if you buy six, which you should: 1/0, 2/0, 3/0, 4/0/ 5/0, and 6/0. This last one leaves a mirror finish on steel.

    Take photographs of anything you're planning to disassemble. I like Nye synthetic clock oil, and I'm experimenting with PBlaster Multi-Lube (new product) for mainspring lubrication.)

    M Kinsler

    I work off the dining room table too.
     
  4. Jerry Kieffer

    Jerry Kieffer Registered User
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  5. R&A

    R&A Registered User

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    I use this spring winder all the time. Only thing is that I had to put it on my lathe and bore out the ID. I had to do this because allot of clicks would not clear the ID. The clamp I had to rework also. The clamp kept slipping. So I put on a different bolt and welded it to the clamp. Took off the butterfly nut and put on a nut that I can actually tighten. Other than all that, works great. The concept is there ,but sometimes ya gotta take a pour design and make it work.
     
  6. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User
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    I'll respond with a different perspective. I think the first "tools" one should acquire should be a few good books on clock repair. "Clock Repair Basics" by Steven Conover http://www.clockmakersnewsletter.com/store/c1/Featured_Products.html is a good one, there are others. Such books describe in detail the operations required to service clocks and the tools required to do so.

    The spring winding gizmo, as others have said, can work on open springs but probably isn't the best use of limited resources. There are a number of commercial and home-built winders that do work well for a variety of spring types but they all have limitations. Again, see what is demonstrated in various clock repair publications as well as searching for spring winders here.

    There are at least a dozen methods to install bushings and just as many opinions regarding the what is the correct way and what's wrong with all the other ways. Again, I recommend first referring to the published literature BUT NOT YOU-TUBE which has as much bad information as good. Before attempting any bushing method, focus on the desired outcome - a clean straight pivot hole positioned exactly where the original hole was. Any method, using the simplest or most exotic tools, can go wrong if poorly executed. Every method has limitations. Tens of thousands of "ordinary" clocks have been rebuilt successfully and run for many decades using the simplest tools. Some methods that may produce satisfactory outcomes on an "ordinary" American kitchen clock for example could be a disaster if applied to fine precision time piece. Focus on the objective, use some common sense, and ask is the method I'm considering likely to accomplish this objective? And have other successfully accomplished this same objective using this method?

    I have to disagree generally with the advice to use short bushings that don't need to be trimmed, especially in American clocks. Stock bushings come usually come with a fairly deep "oil sink". Most American clocks don't have oil sinks and those that do often have them on only one plate. When there is no oil sink the pivot is supported by the full thickness of the plate. If that plate is bushed with a bushing that has an oil sink, then there will be significantly less area to support the pivot. As for bushings to order, I suggest ordering bushings after evaluating the clock being rebuilt and order just those sizes in extra quantity. Pretty soon you will have all the sizes you will need for the kinds of clocks you service.

    RC
     
  7. harold bain

    harold bain Forums Administrator
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    How does this winder work with barrelled springs?
     
  8. Tinker Dwight

    Tinker Dwight Registered User

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    Don't be silly.
    Tinker Dwight
     
  9. harold bain

    harold bain Forums Administrator
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    Barrelled springs are a fact of life if you are repairing clocks. A spring winder that works on every type of spring you may run into is a worthwhile investment if you are looking to be a clock repairman. Early in my clock repairing I determined that fact. I bought a Webster that is still doing the job for me. Springs are dangerous. Having the best equipment to deal with them is something you should think about before the trip to emergency after a spring gets away from you.
     
  10. Time After Time

    Time After Time Registered User
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    I don't see this Encyclopedia link in the thread but I don't have my glasses so if I missed it, my apologies. I don't read so good without them. :glasses:
     
  11. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User
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    Unfortunately that link only describes some of the tools that clock people use including many duplications and no real recommendations. One doesn't need several lathes and several spring winders etc. You may find more relevant material on this page http://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?118690-Items-of-Ongoing-Interest

    RC
     
  12. R&A

    R&A Registered User

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    #12 R&A, Aug 10, 2017
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 10, 2017
    It works perfect for what I use it for. But why would you ask this.Oh are you getting a funny. Plus if you look, this movement that I posted about Doesn't have barrel. But I have a Bergeon spring winder, if that satisfies your curiosity. And works well , but also has it's limitation just like any winder.
     
  13. Time After Time

    Time After Time Registered User
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    I agree that it's abridged, kind of a Reader's Digest version (you have to be pretty old to get that analogy), but it's a start. It probably raises more questions than it answers and so the journey begins...
     
  14. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    Biker: Have you read this? Bushing Using Hand Tools

    That gizmo works fine for loop-end springs like the ones in your clock.

    Take a 6" piece of pvc pipe, saw a slot into the raw end to hold a winding key. Presto! letdown tool.

    Accumulate tools as you need them. You don't need everything at once.

    When these guys talk about "C-clamps" they actually mean C-restraints, not the kind you use to clamp two things together.
     
  15. Time After Time

    Time After Time Registered User
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    I guess bangster prefers to answer your question(s),:(, okay, for me there was an early question as to which pre-manufactured bushing system to buy into? KWM or Bergeon. My understanding at the time was that KWM bushings generally have a smaller footprint or outer diameter so I've gone with them since 2010. Folks that use Bergeon seem to like them as well. Here's a brief thread on the subject: http://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?64662-Bushings-KWM-vs-Bergeon I'm sure there are many more.

    I went straight to a Ollie Baker Spring Winder because that is what my Mentor strongly recommended. Its aluminum bed has a few deep nicks in it where mainsprings tried to get away from me so I'm glad that I have it. (Better it than me)
     
  16. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    I started out with KWM bushings, never saw any reason to change. My first purchase was Timesavers assortment 11604. Lasted a long time.

    My mainspring winder is a Joe Collins. Instructions for making one are in the Repair Hints forum.
     
  17. Time After Time

    Time After Time Registered User
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    Regarding your current lack of space, I fasten my spring winder to the bench temporarily with C-Clamps. Once you have a spring winder, I doubt that you'll have a need for the small, hand-held contraption but I've never used one so I can't say with any certainty. Seeing that you can use the clock movement itself to wind open springs I would suggest that it would be an unnecessary expense and would eventually become a waste of space in your tool box/shop.
     
  18. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    I use Bergeon bushings simply because I bought their roughly 20 sizes starter box when I first started. If I had it to do over, I'd probably go with KWM :)
     
  19. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    Yep. But it's cheap, and will work for now.:chuckling:

    Is what I think.
     
  20. Time After Time

    Time After Time Registered User
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    Okay, won't argue with those points ....but....if one can use the Movement itself, how cheap is it, really? :rolleyes:
     
  21. David S

    David S Registered User
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    Biker something that I haven't seem mentioned is a small bench vise. My main go to, use all the time, is a small machinist vise. It has flat smooth parallel jaws with both a vertical "V" and horizontal "V" in the fixed jaw that is extremely useful for hold round stock without using a lot of clamping pressure.

    View attachment 353126

    David
     
  22. harold bain

    harold bain Forums Administrator
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    So this Bergeon winder won't work with loop end springs? Just asking, I have no experience with it.
     
  23. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    Yes, by all means, a vise. One of mine (I have accumulated several) is a small clamp-onto-the-bench vise with 3" jaws. I park it down at the far end of the bench,
    bring it over in front of me to use, then move it back out of the way.
     
  24. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

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    Yep, you just have to have at least two good vises. One small one, I use an old ball mounted Pan-a-vise with nylon jaws. And a big honking Ridge all steel vise. I couldn't do without either.
    Willie X
     
  25. bikerclockguy

    bikerclockguy Registered User

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    I've seen the "C" restraint clamps for mainsprings, and that will definitely be part of my initial tool order. I hadn't seen a mention of C-clamps to rebush(other than my own); just looking for a little advice from guys who learned the hard way. I will probably try both a C-clamp press-in operation and a tap-in job to see which I like better. The C-clamp is what my instincts are telling me to use, if nothing else than to get the bushing seated correctly before tapping it in. I'll know better when I get started
     
  26. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    #26 bangster, Aug 11, 2017
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2017
  27. wow

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  28. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

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    Best thing to press in bushings is a press. ☺ You can get a decent arbor press (1/2 to 1 ton) for about 30 bucks.
    You will also need a drill press. Get one with a sturdy table and you can use it to press in your bushings.
    Willie X
     
  29. bruce linde

    bruce linde Technical Admin
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    i read it, and it changed my life... highly recommended.

    i also went with kwm bushings but am a hobbyist mostly working on my own clocks.
     
  30. bikerclockguy

    bikerclockguy Registered User

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    Awesome article, especially using the cross-hairs to center the bushing placement. I bought a Dremel tool and drill press type adapter to hold it, so I can get true 90-degree angles at my kitchen table, but the cross-hair trick alone mad it worth the read. I do have a question though. The very last instruction in the article says "Broach and smooth the bush to fit the pivot":???: Why wouldn't you just use a bushing with an ID that fit the pivot in the first place? I know the ODs are different to accommodate different bushing hole requirements, but aren't the pivots pretty much standardized?
     
  31. Time After Time

    Time After Time Registered User
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    #31 Time After Time, Aug 12, 2017
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2017
    If the bushing is a good press fit, the ID will close. You can go the next ID size up in anticipation of that closure, but it's always an approximation. Say your pivot measures 1.0mm. If you select a 1.1mm ID bushing, you'll probably need to broach to size. If you start with a 1.2mm ID, you probably won't need to broach but you don't have a much control either. If there was a lot of wear previously, almost anything will be an improvement but if the wear was borderline and you are just being thorough while you have the plates apart, you'll want to see an improvement in the bearing fit. You might not see much if you start with a loose fit. Some techniques call for smooth broaching to work-harden the ID wall. In that techique you always need to start small, cut to a tight fit and finish up what a smooth broach to harden the brass. Many different approaches. In any case, if you start loose you should be okay. As you progress, you'll want to add a set of cutting and smooth broaches to your shop. Go with five-sided cutting broaches. They should self-center better than four-sided broaches.

    P.S. Be careful to resist the temptation to get a very low tolerance pivot/bushing fit on these types of clocks. I can almost guarantee that if you do, you'll be splitting the plates a second time for broaching due to binding that occurs when the movement gets wound up.
     
  32. Time After Time

    Time After Time Registered User
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    We all have our personal favorite suppliers and some we probably wouldn't give the time of day to.

    Don't forget about the permanent info threads at the top of the forum.

    From there, here's a comprehensive list of suppliers for example:

    http://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?41993-Clock-Suppliers-General-Supply-Tools-Repair-Service-Etc

    Some have a below minimum order total handling charge, some have handling charges on all orders. Some tack on shipping insurance charges unless you ask them not too. Shipping, handling, insurance charges add up so all else being equal, they'll figure in. Large orders, not so much. Small, as needed orders...they become significant to the price you're paying.

    I usually shop timesavers, which I think you said you were preparing an order for, but you do have good alternatives and they (Timesavers) don't carry some things you can find elsewhere. Shop around.
     
  33. bikerclockguy

    bikerclockguy Registered User

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    Thanks a million once again, guys! I bought a Dremmel Workstation and Dremmel rotary tool, so I have a kitchen table drill press for a hundred bucks, and I went with a KWM bushing assortment #10889 that has 2.7mm bushings in stepped 1mm increments, so I should be good to go there for at least my first 2 projects. For the rest of it, I borrowed a few suggestions from everyone, and for a little over $300, I think I'm set to enjoy my new hobby. It will likely be next weekend or close to it when I get started, and I'll definitely keep you guys posted!
     
  34. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    My favorite supplier is Ronell Clocks. No small-order charge.

    Their inventory isn't as large as Timesavers, but for things you're most likely to want, they're good to work with.
    Get their catalog.
     
  35. bikerclockguy

    bikerclockguy Registered User

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    I'll check them out, thanks!
     
  36. David S

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    Biker is sounds like you have done quite a bit of stuff. There are all sorts of special tools that you can make yourself. Even with the limited space and equipment that you have.

    If you don't mind considering used tools I suggest you look at Uncle Larry's website. While he is mostly all about watches he does have a selection of tools for both watches and clocks. I have purchased from him in the past and have been pleased with what I have received. However I am in no way associated with him or his business. And as a friendly note. I have tried to deal him down in the past, but to no avail, so gave that one up. Even if I didn't see something on his site, I have emailed him and he has come up with something that wasn't listed yet.

    David
     
  37. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

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    This is good advice. I always try to be too tidy when bushing, and sometimes things lock up; the latest being a Hermle carriage clock movement with 0.9mm pivots. A spring-wound clock movement will tend to twist a bit when fully-wound, so you need a bit more shake in its pivots than perhaps you'd wish to see. 0.1 or 0.2 mm of shake isn't going to stop the clock.

    It's been my experience that a smooth broach never seems to enlarge a pivot hole enough to notice.

    Mark Kinsler
     
  38. bikerclockguy

    bikerclockguy Registered User

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    I will definitely heed the advice, guys, and it makes sense. I hadn't considered the bushing ID shrinking; mostly because everything I've done along those lines had been a lot bigger and the material was harder as well, and it wasn't a worry in those cases. I had been thinking(just in general, before the bushing fir question came up)that I would go with a fit on the looser side. I know what can happen if things are too tight, and by the same token, my old Ansonia is loose as a goose and still keeps good time. So, along those lines, is .1mm over pivot diameter a good rule of thumb when selecting bushings? I think I will buy a set of cutting and smoothing broaches too, while I'm at it. In for a penny, in for a pound as they say, and I'd hate to botch my first bushing job because I didn't have the tools to do it right.
     
  39. Time After Time

    Time After Time Registered User
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    I definitely recommend a set of cutting and smoothing broaches (and a good pin vise to hold them) if you're going to do bushing work. There is some variance in just how tight a bushing will fit into your prepared plate so there will be variance in the ID shrinkage. Also, Pivots don't always "fit" neatly into our set sizes anyway. The smaller the pivot, the more that will be the case I think. To answer your question, I generally go 0.1 mm over the pivot measurement and I frequently have to broach for a good fit afterwards.

    Some folks recommend use of Loctite when placing bushings. It shouldn't really be necessary if there is a good press fit, but from time to time, for one reason or another, you will run across a loose fit situation and you'll need a way to make sure the bushing stays put. Another method to deal with a loose bushing is to peen it by striking a small ball bearing resting in the hole/oil sink. While that approach works well and is fast you'll definitely need to broach afterwards.
     
  40. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

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    I agree with Tat.

    Many clock repairers don't use the full asortments though. They only use two or three bushing sizes in each catagory. A category being all the bushing sizes available for a single cutter size. For the KWM. ystem a #3 cutter will be used for about 90% of your work. An abrevitated set of bushings requires a much smaller inventory but a lot more broaching ...
    You can't do bushing work without cutting broaches. All pivot holes have to be fitted to each individual pinion. The smooth broaches are important too, especially on low powered clocks, like French clocks and 400-Day clocks. You could postpone the smooth broaches for later but you will need a good champering tool. All new bushings need a slight chamfer on the inside edge of the pivot hole.
    Willie X
     
  41. BLKBEARD

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    Willie;
    Why do you need a chamfer on the inboard side of the bushing?
     
  42. Jerry Kieffer

    Jerry Kieffer Registered User
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    I could not agree more with your last sentence.

    From what I can see in the photo, your movement looks somewhat unmolested and being very loose would indicate that it has most likely ran for many many years.
    If so, this would indicate that the manufacturer got it right and produced a properly functioning instrument that ran for a very long period of time. The original pivot holes were straight and round as well as aligned 90 degrees to the plate and generally 3-5 percent larger than the pivot for this type movement. This was done in this manner to most effectively utilize lubrication to decrease friction as well as maximize lubrication retention. By retuning a movement to its original condition, you greatly increase your chances of a strong running movement. The use of conventional drills and reamers can produce straight round holes that are properly aligned in the same manner as manufacturer. The original manufacturers did not use smoothing broaches.

    Jerry Kieffer
     
  43. AJSBSA

    AJSBSA Registered User
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    Surely original manufacturer drilled/reamed straight holes because it was the most efficient way to manufacture the movement burnishing the pivot holes would of been out of the question in a production environment.
     
  44. Jerry Kieffer

    Jerry Kieffer Registered User
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    #44 Jerry Kieffer, Aug 13, 2017
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2017
     
  45. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

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    #45 Willie X, Aug 13, 2017
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 13, 2017
    Jerry,
    The old American manufacturers didn't take much time polishing pivots either. Some pivots will still have the tool marks from the lathe.
    I wouldn't think that lowering standards, just because the maker decided to cut corners, is a good policy.
    Willie X

    - - - Updated - - -
     
  46. Jerry Kieffer

    Jerry Kieffer Registered User
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    #46 Jerry Kieffer, Aug 13, 2017
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 14, 2017
    - - - Updated - - -

    Willie
    I would agree 100 percent since I have observed the same thing.

    However, it would be interesting to inspect a 100 year old common movement that has not been ran. I think I was shown one many years ago but never inspected it. I often suspect most damage to a pivot is caused by the poor quality brass of the hole that holds it.

    Jerry Kieffer
     
  47. bikerclockguy

    bikerclockguy Registered User

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    I agree, why not do by hand what wasn't done by machine, but I too am curious about the inboard side chamfer. It certainly wouldn't add that much time to the job, but what does it accomplish? There was an(indirect)opposing view in my bushing thread. I don't remember who, but one person who replied to my question on bushing height was of the opinion that it was better to go tall on the bushings and trim them, so that the ends were square with the plate rather than tapered, giving the pivot more bushing surface to ride on. I don't have the experience to agree or disagree here. I can certainly see that principle having merit in heavy equipment and machinery where there is a lot of weight and pressure involved; maybe not so much in a part that weighs an ounce or so? If there is a longevity advantage to adding the chamfer, that's definitely worth knowing about, but I'd like to hear the theory. I'm just one of those guys who has a hard time taking "Do it this way, it'll work" for an answer.. I kinda like to understand the principle behind it. Thanks!
     
  48. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    Jerry,
    I don't want to get to far off track here but I have seen one brand new Ingraham kitchen clock from about 1900.# I was surprised to see how nice everything looked. The long pivots even looked longer when new. The pivot fit was tighter than I expected and the tolerances were very uniform throughout. It was very odd to see a perfect new factory dial! The pendulum and I guess the key were wrapped in thick paper and nailed to the bottom of the base. I would like to see that clock again but I'm guessing not.

    Question, do you think the drilled holes were left unfinished for a reason, like oil retention, or quick wear in? Or was it that good enough was good enough?

    Willie
     
  49. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

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    #49 Willie X, Aug 13, 2017
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2017
    Bike,
    Binding man ... it's all about the binding!
    Look at just about any pivot under a microscope. At the root of the pivot you will see a small radius where the pivot merges into the arbor. If the pivot hole is large enough (sloppy) the sharp edge of the new bushing will ride high up on this radius and probably wont bind. But on the other hand, if your bushing is a little tight, not actually to tight mind you, the leading edge of the radius will present a sharp angle into the bushing and bind like a morse taper. This can happen at any time the arbor decides to creep over toward the plate, maybe after the clock is laid down on it's back when taking it home, or during winding.
    It only takes a few seconds to make the tiny chamfer and this problem will have no place to happen, even if you do leave the pivot hole a tad to tight.
    Willie X
     
  50. BLKBEARD

    BLKBEARD Registered User
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    Nov 15, 2016
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    Thanx Willie

    That would explain why sometimes I think I fitted everything ever so nice. Re-assemble it and find a binding wheel.
     
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