Tip for replacing the hammer leather.

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by shimmystep, Jul 8, 2018.

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  1. shimmystep

    shimmystep Registered User
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    Mar 5, 2012
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    I was replacing the hammer leather on a Lenzkirch today, a customers mantel clock. I thought someone may appreciate a tip or two when doing this.

    Cut the leather, enough to fold over.
    20180708_184500.jpg


    Soak it in water with a some PVA glue in it. I added a little more water in the mix you see below.
    20180708_184555.jpg


    Fold it over, shape it in a split stake, and close it up in a vice
    20180708_184111.jpg


    Take it out when dried up
    20180708_192032.jpg


    Cut to length, glues it in, and shape the end with sand paper.
    20180708_192130.jpg
     
  2. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    Mind if I copy this to Helpful Hints?
     
  3. shimmystep

    shimmystep Registered User
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    Not at all bang.
     
  4. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

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    Hmm. A few years ago when I was an inexperienced clock hatchling I bought a length of round hammer leather from Timesavers and had not a bit of luck with it. If you could get it into the hammer cavity at all, which generally is tough because it doesn't quite fit, the resulting sound is way too soft.

    What I finally did was to take a piece of plastic string-trimmer string, fold it over on itself, squeeze it with pliers, stick the closed end into the hammer cavity, and snip the pieces that extend from the hammer cavity off with diagnonal cutters. It makes a nice-sounding hammer and doesn't generally need Super Glue to hold it in place.

    What are you using for the leather shown in your pictures, and what's PVA glue? (They talk about it a lot at the Mechanical Music Digest, whose parishioners repair player pianos.)

    M Kinsler
     
  5. mauleg

    mauleg Registered User
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    I'm a fan of VERY bright and loud sounding chimes, so typically replace leather/plastic hammer tips with a bit of pegwood. It fits perfectly without glue, lasts a very long time without deterioration, and makes the LOUD BRIGHT sound that I prefer. I do, however, save the original leather/plastic tips in case I ever should wish to sell the clock. I realize that not everyone likes outrageously bright and loud chimes...
     
  6. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    Thanks for the tip. I often roll and tape leathers but never thought about using the ole split block ...

    Kins,
    PVA = Poly vinyl acetate. Commonly known over here as Elmers-Glue-All.

    Willie X
     
  7. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

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    I never thought of using wood. I'll try it.

    I re-hammered a floating-balance carriage clock with all-brass hammer heads because the owner wanted them as loud as possible. It really sounded good,
     
  8. brian fisher

    brian fisher Registered User
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    timesavers sells 3 diameters of hammer leather. I replaced the leathers in my winterhalder with the largest size they sell. I found that I needed to file the end that screws back into the hammer to a dull point in order to make it fit into the cup.

    personally, I really like the soft, et deep booming sound the clock produces with the new leather attached. I left about 1/4" of leather protruding and slowly shortened it up while experimenting with the sound. I would let it smack the rods a few times, slice a little off with a razor blade....so on and so forth until I got the tone I wanted. I think they all have about 1/8" protruding.

    I do think there are some good ideas listed here if you want a different tone however.
     
  9. R&A

    R&A Registered User

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    I use sole leather and no glue. I guess I would rather have a smooth sound than the hard leather sound. Sounds to much like metal contact. But each to there own. I cut the leather with a pair of snips and fit it into the hammer or screw it in. Then hammer down a little to tighten the leather. If you taper it a little it will grab the threads as it threads in. With out threads I just hammer it in to fit.
     
  10. shimmystep

    shimmystep Registered User
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    Lots of ways to skin the cat!

    PVA, basically wood glue. I have found mixing the glue with water gives enough strength to hold it together, but soft enough to now sound too hard. The leather you can see is from the tongues of a old pair of shoes! Before I throw anything away i always think about what bits will be useful :)
     
  11. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    Discarded belt also.
     
  12. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

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    I sure wish cuckoo clock gongs sounded better. I spend lots of time adjusting them, bending either that amazingly cheesy hammer or the gong, which is worse, but even when you've finally kept the gong coil from chattering against the fallen hammer and the cuckoo whistles and the clock back it still sounds pretty revolting.

    But my customers love them. At the moment I have one fixed and three to go.

    M Kinsler

    I refuse to wear lederhosen, but maybe one of those green Bavarian hats with the feather would be okay.
     
  13. claussclocks

    claussclocks Registered User
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    If I wore lederhosen it would be the equivalent of an elephant in a tutu. Ain't happening!
    Good tips on leather though, thanks.
     
  14. brian fisher

    brian fisher Registered User
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    pics?:D
     
    bruce linde likes this.
  15. shutterbug

    shutterbug Super Moderator
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    The cuckoo sound has been reported as saying: "Dang! cuckoo, dang!, cuckoo! :D
     
  16. bruce linde

    bruce linde Technical Admin
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    i know we're not supposed to link to active sales or auctions, but assume those are clock sales or auctions: Elephant in a tutu
     
  17. claussclocks

    claussclocks Registered User
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    OK. Since you found an elephant in a tutu I drug out the lederhose.

    OOPS!! Lens cap was still on, Rats!!

    black.jpg
     

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