Tightening a hole

MuensterMann

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Mar 23, 2008
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I have a gathering pallet that has a hole that needs to be slightly tighter. I have a box full of spring-loaded and other type of punches, but I am wondering how to choose the right size. Any suggestions?
 

Altashot

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I normally use a round nose punch. This method won’t leave noticeable marks.

Spring loaded punches, in my opinion, are not the best to use here, impossible to control the force. As with centre punches, it will leave prick marks, which are quite frowned upon in horology.

If the hole is way too large, fabricating a new gathering pallet might be more advisable. Maybe a bushing could be installed? I’ve never done it nor seen it but it might be acceptable, although it might look weird.

M.
 

MuensterMann

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Thank you Altashot for the input! I just need a little tiny bit of tightening. I will look for a rounded head punch in my collection.
 

glenhead

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You can also round off the point of a large nail. If you don't have a grinding or sharpening stone a concrete sidewalk or driveway makes a good one, and they're usually pretty easy to find. :) Note that grinding a nail on concrete will leave marks on the concrete, so be careful you don't do it where anyone will care about the marks.

Glen
 

Altashot

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Excellent!
I’m glad it worked.
What did you end up using?

M.
 

shutterbug

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I bush them, just like any other worn hole.
 

Rob Martinez

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Good infor for me for future use - thank you. I have a terminology question I am hoping someone can help me with. When you say hole on the 'gathering pallet' do you mean a hole on the clock plate that the verge pinion goes through, or do you mean it is a different kind of clock works with holes on the sides of the verge/pallets that ride on a fixed arbor?
 

bangster

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I think we're talking about the gathering pallet, not the verge.
 

MuensterMann

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Yes, on the rack and snail.

Anyway, my technique didn't hold. I will either try again or considered a tight bushing.
 

shutterbug

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You have to support the bushing while you do it. A regular bench block does well. Alternately, a little red LocTite will keep it in place, but requires a bit of drying time.
 
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MuensterMann

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i will try tightening the hole again, but it only will close a part of the cylinder-shaped hole. Anyway, I will try it.
 

bangster

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Hasn't anybody mentioned the steel ball bearing method? Sometimes works better than the rounded punch. Same technique. Set bearing on top of hole; smack it with a hammer. Repeat on other side. Might do the job, avoid the hassle of bushing.
 

MuensterMann

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It is not oval shaped. I say a cylinder cause the hole is three dimensional as it goes through the pallet. Do pallet holes also become oval:???:?

Ball bearing sounds like a great idea!
 

Altashot

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The hole should not nor should it become oval. It’s only pressed on and pulled off. It can however become wallowed out.

A round punch or ball bearing, of an appropriate size, should fold some brass back in the hole enough for a tight fit on the arbour.

I’m actually surprised it didn’t work for you. Maybe you should try to strike it with more authority. If the hole becomes too small, broaching will open it up again to proper fit.

If you choose to use a ball bearing, use caution and eye protection, they can fly at great velocities when struck.

I prefer punches. They can be held more securely and are designed to be struck. They can also fly at great velocities if glanced but they are still safer, in my opinion, than ball bearings.

M.
 

Uhralt

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If you want to tighten not only the ends of the hole but more of the cylinder, you can use a flat punch and do some more intense staking. That will compress the cylinder and tighten the hole.

Uhralt
 

MuensterMann

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Second time around I did a little more force. Now, I must broach.

As for ball bearing taking flight, I do not want to shoot my eye out doing clock repair!
 

Vernon

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How about a tiny smear of clear nail polish on the post and shove it on or the LocTite that Shutterbug mentioned?
 

RJSoftware

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Just wanted to throw this in the mix.I

THE HAMMER TONG PLATFORM

(tada...!)

Next time you see a handle-less hammer head or nearly any disposable hammer, make the following tool out of it.

Cut/grind one of the tongs off nail pulling side. Now you can clamp hammer head into various positions in bech vice.

This give you the ability to reach in between tight areas with a platform that can be hammered upon.

So for example, you have a gear at top end (small gears) you wish to punch/peen, you can reach between plates and set desired area on hammer prong and have support underneath while punch/peening, all without total disassembly.

For newbians, understand, after power is let down, you can remove top end nuts/pins and spread the plates just wide enough to remove smaller gears easy. Then with gear out of way you can work on bushing hole

The reverse, putting movement back together, is also true. So when assembling, decide what gears have to be in place before setting top plate on. You'd be surprised what you can slide in giving plates a small spread. That way assembly is much less struggle.

Also, on some movement, the escape wheel rises out above top plate level. The hammer tong platform (official Arjay tool name :) ) can help to repair that bushing as well.

Delicate, deliberate repeated taps are better approach to peening than heavy handed. But you know, one mans rough is another's toilet paper.

RJ
 
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MuensterMann

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Had to broach and it was a tight fit going on, but it still likes to rotate. I hate to use LocTite, but may have to. Does it hold very well?
 

RJSoftware

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Kaki-shibu is the fermented tannin juice from an unripe persimmon and is used to waterproof, insect proof, strengthen and dye paper.

strengthen..?

I drink onion skin tea every now and then. I don't do cellphones and my internet is Kindle fire. Cameras suck on it, too much bother, plus goo from taped lens, (think Snowden) they spy. So just think of a claw hammer head. Cut one of claws off. Put hammer head in bench vice any position you like. Waa laaa...! (aka voila )
 
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shutterbug

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That would be voila, but we grade spelling on a curve, so no worries :D
 

bangster

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I was thinking of the puckering properties of persimmon juice for tightening the hole. :eek:
 

RJSoftware

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hmmm, ... , but, ..., hmmm.

No, must restrain...

...

voila. Ah, I learn. French I suppose.
 
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