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19th c American "Tiger" gallery clock

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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Nov 26, 2009
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I am a sucker for the Brewster et al (& Ingraham, E & A, and so on) gallery clocks.

Here's the latest.

brewster & ingraham gallery 1.JPG

12 inch flat wood dial. According to Ultsch and Cowan, these gallery clocks with flat dials and glass, as opposed to convex, are uncommon.

What particularly attracted me to this example was the "tiger" birch case. Very strong figure. The case was refinished and is a bit to shiny for my taste. A similar example is shown in Tran's Ingraham book on page 70. However, that one is said to have a 10 inch dial.

The flat wood dial is unsigned. I could see no evidence of there having once been a signature. Except for the missing winding grommet, it is in nice condition.
I especially like the original open spade hands that are found with many these clocks.

Here is the signed 8 day time only movement:

brewster and ingraham gallery 3.JPG brewster and ingraham gallery 7.JPG

These are often called "east-west" movements. Though not inaccurate, to me such nomenclature is confusing as the same term is used to refer to Torrington ww movements. I call them "horizontal". Call me what you wish, just don't call me late for dinner.

Both plates are brass. The front plate is not ribbed. It retains its original brass spring.

Note how the pendulum is suspended from a post at the top of the backboard and is behind the movement.

Here is the underside of the movement

brewster and ingraham gallery 2.JPG

Note how the brass back plate is "stepped" to accommodate the pendulum. Also note the escapement is at the bottom of the movement, so I guess one can consider this a form of "upside down" movement, too??

I have seen a # of variations of the horizontal movements in these clocks. Some have cutouts in the brass front plate which are the shape of the handles of the keys used as well as other configurations. Sometimes the front plates are ribbed like other Brewster and Ingraham movements. Cast iron back plates were also used. See Ultsch and Cowan and Tran for more about this and these clocks in general.

It has a good, very intact albeit somewhat darkened label with a close-up of the printer's credit:

brewster and ingraham gallery 6.JPG brewster and ingraham gallery 5.JPG

Just for fun, here are some of the others who will keep it company:

Brewster & I 1.JPG Brewster & I 5.JPG Brewster & I 2.JPG Brewster&1 4.JPG Brewster &I 3.JPG ingraham gilt gallery clock 4.JPG

All of these have been previously discussed on the Forums, so look around for more info.

2 quickie superfluous objects. Hopefully I haven't exceeded the photo limit.

I have discussed the work of John Haley Bellamy before. I recent handled a very fine example of one of his Masonic frames with an eagle which he made in partnership with Titcomb in Charlestown, MA:

bellamy frame 1.jpg

At the same time, I handled a scarce Masonic hand mirror frame and a wall shelf also by Titcomb and Bellamy. I suspect few of the hand mirror frames survived as they were quite fragile. Unfortunately, dimwit here did not photograph either of those before parting with them.

I have also talked about folk marquetry before. Recently handled this, IMCO, wonderful example:

folk marquetry table 2.jpg folk marquetry table.jpg

Base is rather simple, showing a mission influence. But oh that top.

RM
 

the 3rd dwarve

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Nov 3, 2000
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Hi RM,

That's tiger red birch. It's very rare and I don't even know where I would start to look to purchase some. If I did find some I would expect it to exceed the cost of rosewood so maybe $20 per BF. I like the way the grain of the four segments is oriented so as to make the rays look to be emanating from the center. It's absolutely gorgeous.

You could try rubbing it down with a cotton pad saturated with Paraffin oil and F grade pumice powder to kill the gloss, then wipe it down with mineral spirits and apply a good polish.

Nice acquisition, thanks for sharing.

D`
 
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rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

NAWCC Member
Nov 26, 2009
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Hi RM,

That's tiger red birch. It's very rare and I don't even know where I would start to look to purchase some. If I did find some I would expect it to exceed the cost of rosewood so maybe $20 per BF. I like the way the grain of the four segments is oriented so as to make the rays look to be emanating from the center. It's absolutely gorgeous.

You could try rubbing it down with a cotton pad saturated with Paraffin oil and F grade pumice powder to kill the gloss, then wipe it down with mineral spirits and apply a good polish.

Nice acquisition, thanks for sharing.

D`
Thanks for the information, advice and kind words!

It is a wonderful example how the orientation of the grain of the wood, both solid (as here) and veneers, were once used to such decorative advantage even on a manufactured product.

The tabletop is another example of artistry in wood. Each bit was selected and assembled for the ultimate decorative effect of the whole by a craftsperson working for their own satisfaction. The clock case and tabletop represent 2 very different approaches to using wood for decorative purposes, but related nonetheless.

RM
 
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