Tiffany Neverwind Double Contact battery

Discussion in 'Electric Horology' started by sweede, Oct 29, 2002.

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  1. sweede

    sweede Guest

    I am not seeking information on modifying a clock to use Radio Shack battery holders.
    I am looking for information on and pictures of the original batteries used in this clock. Mine appears to have a holder for two cylindrical batteries like a half sized dry cell. If so this would be be either 1.5 volts or 3 volts. Is the larger double contact model of this clock a 3 volt operation? Pictures would be most appreciated as I like to make reproductions of the origianl batteries with the old labels.
    Ken Carlson
     
  2. sweede

    sweede Guest

    I am not seeking information on modifying a clock to use Radio Shack battery holders.
    I am looking for information on and pictures of the original batteries used in this clock. Mine appears to have a holder for two cylindrical batteries like a half sized dry cell. If so this would be be either 1.5 volts or 3 volts. Is the larger double contact model of this clock a 3 volt operation? Pictures would be most appreciated as I like to make reproductions of the origianl batteries with the old labels.
    Ken Carlson
     
  3. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
    NAWCC Fellow NAWCC Member

    Aug 24, 2000
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    All the data at hand indicates that all Tiffany Never Wind clocks require 4-1/2 volts. This would include the double contact model 1000, the 1100 and the 2000 model Cloister as well as the Niagra clocks.

    I don't have the demensions for the double contact battery form factor but it could easily have been an ordinary (then) "C" radio bias battery (4.5v) The 1100 and smaller single contact clocks used a proprietary 4.5 volt battery.

    Personally, I'd avoid plastic battery holders and instead try to locate metal holders. The readily available plastic boxes for size "D" cells rip apart from the spring pressure.
     

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