• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

Thrift Store Find

Bruce Winchester

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Jun 7, 2020
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My son found these two clocks in a thrift store and sent me a few pics. I know the pics are not much to go on, but any advice would be appreciated. I'm mainly looking to get something to practice clock repair on. The price was $50 each.

First clock:

Attach0.jpg gil.jpg

Second Clock:
nh.jpg nh2.jpg nh3.jpg
 

Salsagev

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$50 is a “mid-range” price IMO and the clocks look to be in decent condition. I am a bit concerned about the black mantle as the gong and the case resemble a Seth Thomas but the face and dial fitted with new Haven. I also see other mounting holes in the back of the New Haven, if it’s not the angle or lighting. The Sessions is a great clock but may have click issues like mine did.
 

Ticktocktime100

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Hi,

As suggested above, I would offer that amount for the pair, a fair price for two projects. If they don’t accept, I’d only go for the second one (New Haven) because of the poor condition of the dial on the Gilbert. You could probably get the New Haven for $35-40 alone.

Regards.
 

Bruce Winchester

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Jun 7, 2020
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Thanks, guys. I thought they were a little high on the price. I like the the Gilbert, but the face puts me off. The New Haven also appears to have a different mainspring on the left side. It doesn't look to be blue.
 

Salsagev

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lpbp

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The second clock is most surely a Seth Thomas with wrong movement and dial. as has been suggested if you paid 50 ea. it's a little high, the Seth Thomas to find the right movement dial and parts would set you back about 100, but you would have a nice clock
 

Salsagev

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The second clock is most surely a Seth Thomas with wrong movement and dial.
Yes it is.


I think it is best to pass on both of these because of the bad dial of the Gilbert and the marriage of this clock. Looks like there is also some cracking in the front part of the Seth Thomas.
 

Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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Just look closely to make sure ALL the parts are there and nothing is badly damaged or missing. Don't worry to much about a missing key, broken spring, pendulum, or suspension rods. But, it is common to find this type specimen with severe damage, like folded over wheels and other molestations that are not repairable.
I'm thinking about a movement practice clock. Others seem to be thinking about a restoration project, that will result in a presentable piece when your done. That might be the best course to take. The money won't be much different!!! These days, clocks are considered pretty much junk (by most) no matter what condition they are in. :( Willie X
 

Bruce Winchester

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You guys are confirming what I thought. These are just not worth it for the price when there are nicer clocks out there. I just wanted to be sure I wasn't passing on something valuable.
Thanks for your help.
 

Salsagev

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I'm thinking about a movement practice clock. Others seem to be thinking about a restoration project, that will result in a presentable piece when your done. That might be the best course to take. The money won't be much different!!! These days, clocks are considered pretty much junk (by most) no matter what condition they are in. :( Willie X
I might let the shop know it’s a marriage and they might come down on the price.
Edit: just saw the thread update. Yes it’s a good idea to pass IMO.
 

Salsagev

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Looks like a Japanese take on an Ansonia clock. I can’t advice you on this movement type but others can. Enjoy!
 

Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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I wonder what happened to the calendar function?
Yes, this is a knock off of the famous Ansonia "Pacemaker" line of movements. I understand that long ago the Japanese actually bought the rights to produce this clock. But Ansonia went away around 1930, so I guess it was anybody's game after then? This clock is probably from the 1970s to early 80s.
Willie X
 

shutterbug

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I think the two clocks will be great for learning on. You have picked a couple of challenging ones. The Gilbert appears to have steel plates. That probably dates it to the second world war. Fortunately, it has brass inserts to make bushing easier, but remember that the pivot holes are not always dead center in those, and that's for a purpose. Gilbert's often have a cracked pinion on the center shaft. They are available from most suppliers but usually need to be reamed out a bit because they fit way too tight (which might be why the originals cracked so often).
The other I believe is a Seth Thomas case, and one of my favorite ST designs. I think you could find an 89 movement and a proper dial for it pretty easily. That one is worth way more than the asking price if restored.
 

Steven Thornberry

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The Gilbert appears to have steel plates. That probably dates it to the second world war.
More likely WWI. Gilbert had ceased producing 8-day pendulum movements by 1940. The movement may well have a year stamped on the front.
 

Salsagev

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On the first two clocks, for practice either one is fine. My number one no-no for buying is "buy no clock without a complete bezel" so if you are going to fix it up go for the Gilbert.
A very good rule. They are very hard to replace and you’ll end up spending lots. Also buy no clock with hot glue.
 

Bruce Winchester

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Wow, I never even noticed the missing glass on the second clock. Great advice.
Speaking of hot glue, I bought a cuckoo clock with hot glue holding the whistle assembly. It wouldn't work because the whistle was glued in too low and the bellow couldn't open fully.

I'm going to offer them $25 for the Gilbert if they have it in a few weeks.
 

Salsagev

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Speaking of hot glue, I bought a cuckoo clock with hot glue holding the whistle assembly. It wouldn't work because the whistle was glued in too low and the bellow couldn't open fully.
Yes, it’s a demonic solution.
Wow, I never even noticed the missing glass on the second clock. Great advice.
It’s not only missing glass but missing the entire door and hinge broken in half.
 
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