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value History Thomas Earnshaw Regency Bracket Clock

aucaj

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Hello,

Can anyone tell me more about this clock by Earnshaw and its history? Did Earnshaw make very many clocks?

It has sustained damage to the case. Is it worth repairing? Is it something that requires professional repair?

Where can I find domed glass for the front? How is the glass on the back door attached?

Thank you,
Chris

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jmclaugh

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A really lovely bracket clock that is most definitely worth repairing and of being done professionally. A replacement convex glass should be readily available from suppliers.

There was the Thomas Earnshaw(I) of chronometer fame and his successors, son Thomas(II) and grandson Thomas(III). My understanding is Thomas(I) didn't make that many clocks and I suspect this clock is by Thomas(II) who succeeded his father in 1829 and was at High Holborn from then to 1833. Others may know more.
 

JTD

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Baillie lists Thomas Earnshaw (b. 1749, d. 1829) of High Holborn, London. If you got to www.thomas-earnshaw.com you can read a lot about him and his clocks.

You can get a convex glass for the front from any of the clock glass suppliers (some are listed in the NAWCC Bulletin Mart).

As to the back glass, it may have been fixed with putty or wooden strips, but you should be able to see the remains of whatever was used. The back glass would have been flat.

A very lovely clock, well worth restoring.

JTD
 
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novicetimekeeper

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Lovely to have a signed movement and a very good name and address. As to how many clocks any signatory made, well they were more than likely bought in to a large extent.
 
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aucaj

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A really lovely bracket clock that is most definitely worth repairing and of being done professionally. A replacement convex glass should be readily available from suppliers.

There was the Thomas Earnshaw(I) of chronometer fame and his successors, son Thomas(II) and grandson Thomas(III). My understanding is Thomas(I) didn't make that many clocks and I suspect this clock is by Thomas(II) who succeeded his father in 1829 and was at High Holborn from then to 1833. Others may know more.
Hi Jonathan,

The clock dates between 1810 to 1820. So, I believe it was prior to Thomas (II)'s succession but during the period where Thomas (I) was partnered with his son.

R/
Chris
 

aucaj

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Please let me know if you have any recommended clock case restorers. Please feel free to PM me with your recommendations.
 

aucaj

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Another question for the clock experts:

I can't see how the back glass was attached because I can't open it. The key to the back door is missing. Is there any possibility of finding a replacement key? Are these keys specific to a particular lock? Can I buy a generic replacement or do I have to have one made? If not, can I buy a replacement lock with matching key from somewhere?

I collect watches and this is my first clock. I really appreciate the advice.

Kind Regards,
Chris
 

JTD

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Another question for the clock experts:

I can't see how the back glass was attached because I can't open it. The key to the back door is missing. Is there any possibility of finding a replacement key? Are these keys specific to a particular lock? Can I buy a generic replacement or do I have to have one made? If not, can I buy a replacement lock with matching key from somewhere?

I collect watches and this is my first clock. I really appreciate the advice.

Kind Regards,
Chris
These are very simple keys, they are not complex locks. You may find that you have a small cupboard or drawer key that will fit. If not, take the clock to a locksmith they would easily be able to supply you with a suitable key.

JTD
 
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novicetimekeeper

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If you are having the case restored they will be able to make you a key. Both the cabinet maker who does my cases and the guys who restore the movements make keys to fit.
 
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aucaj

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If you are having the case restored they will be able to make you a key. Both the cabinet maker who does my cases and the guys who restore the movements make keys to fit.
Thanks, Nick. Please could you PM me with your cabinet maker?
 

novicetimekeeper

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DeanT

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I remember seeing this one for auction and really liked the look and the quality name.

Chamfer top clocks were made from about 1815 to past the end of the Georgian period. Although I feel this is probably towards the earlier part of this period so likely Thomas senior. Earnshaw did have a relationship with wholesale suppliers Thwaites and Reed so it is possible it was bought in as Nick suggested.

Westmorland glass cut glass for carriage clocks so they might be able to help. Although Scott might be able to source glass himself. Its a clock that deserves proper restoration and is well worth restoring. BTW Scott is a genius.

Cheers
Dean
 
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jmclaugh

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Earnshaw did have a relationship with wholesale suppliers Thwaites and Reed so it is possible it was bought in as Nick suggested.

Cheers
Dean
Yes, Rose in his book on dial clocks lists 8 known jobs by T&R for Thomas Earnshaw, what type of clocks and which Thomas Earnshaw is not mentioned. T&R typically marked their clocks on the frontplate and the aforementioned book has an approximate dating table for serial #s, a look at the frontplate will confirm it can be attributed to them.
 
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Chris Radano

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I have used these guys a few times for glass. They can do your convex glass, send them the bezel and they will fit it in for you. You would have to tell them how much you would like the dial to be convex, probably about 1". They can do a beveled edge, too. But yours probably was not beveled. Also they can cut any shape. Recently I had them do a break-arch shaped piece for a Georgian bracket clock. They are fast and reasonably priced. I recommend.
 
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aucaj

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T&R typically marked their clocks on the frontplate
Thanks to everyone for the additional information and references.

Hi Jonathan,
Can you walk me through the process to check the frontplate? I have never removed a clock from a case. As I mentioned, I don't have a key to open the back, but I can probably take out the hinge pins to remove the door. I assume I need to remove the movement and the dial? Where and what am I looking for?

Kind Regards,
Chris
 

aucaj

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Do any of you have a subscription to Clocks Magazine (clocksmagazine.com)? Starting on page 26 of the July 2020 issue there is an article by
Richard Stuart on a nearly identical Earnshaw clock except his dial had been repainted and the movement was unsigned. Mr. Stuart took his clock to be examined by the British Horological Institute workshops in Newark. His research also identified that Thomas Earnshaw's shop retailed in domestic clocks from the late 1700s into the 19th century. Thwaites and Reed is the only recorded source as you have mentioned. Mr. Stuart's clock did not have any obvious markings for T&R. He requests the readers for any information on suppliers of castings marked ‘B’ or ‘SPEARS’?

I hope to do a complete disassembly to check for all markings. However, I need to confident that I understand the disassembly and reassembly process for the clock before I begin. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Kind Regards,
Chris
 

JTD

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Do any of you have a subscription to Clocks Magazine (clocksmagazine.com)? Starting on page 26 of the July 2020 issue there is an article by
Richard Stuart on a nearly identical Earnshaw clock
I have this issue of Clocks Magazine. Are you sure you have quoted the correct copy, because on page 26 of July 2020 issue is an article by Thomas Wotruba entitled 'Rare English Travel Clock by Benjamin Lewis Vulliamy'. Nothing there by Richard Stuart.

Could you check your reference please and I will be glad to look for the one you need.

JTD

PS I have now found the article referred to . It was published in Clocks Magazine, July 2020, pages 16-21.

The pagination referred to by the OP seems to have been on a pre-publication printer's proof page.
 
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jmclaugh

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Thanks to everyone for the additional information and references.

Hi Jonathan,
Can you walk me through the process to check the frontplate? I have never removed a clock from a case. As I mentioned, I don't have a key to open the back, but I can probably take out the hinge pins to remove the door. I assume I need to remove the movement and the dial? Where and what am I looking for?

Kind Regards,
Chris
HI Chris,
Yes you'll need to remove the movement from the case and then remove the hands and then the dial. As far as I can tell the movement is attached by two brackets, top left and bottom right screwed to the backplate and the inside of the case, the hands look friction fit and held by a tapering pin. The dial should be attached to the frontplate via dial posts which are pinned, so removing the pins will allow the dial to come away and reveal the frontplate which is where you may find the mark T&R.

It is a lovely clock regardless of whether T&R may have supplied it so if you aren't comfortable doing that then don't and if you get the clock restored you can wait until then as the movement will have to come out at that point.
 
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aucaj

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Thank you, Jonathan. I think your description seems fairly straightforward. It will be a while before I will have an opportunity to remove it. Hopefully if everything goes well, I will return to this thread with some photos of the front plate and any other markings I find.
 

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