This is the earliest 8 day I ever owned

P.Hageman

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For removing the calendar ring, I only needed to remove the upper roller. Then you can lift the ring off the dial.
 

novicetimekeeper

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For removing the calendar ring, I only needed to remove the upper roller. Then you can lift the ring off the dial.
I'm surprised there is enough play to do that. In operation the ring is at full depth in the bottom two, and for the top one to work must be engaged in that one too.
 

John8

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A lot of character there. I used to restore wood back to the 1700s using techniques of the time. Important that whomever does the work is very subtle about what they do. Very nice!
 

Errantly

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Very interesting. Thought you might like to see mine. Replacement case unfortunately. I wonder if the triple crown was to do with William of Orange becoming King of England, Ireland and Scotland in 1689. There was also the Oath of allegiance in 1688, he was titled William the third. All speculation on my part of course.
As you can see an arch was added to the dial quite early on which will mean finding a suitable case for it a real pain, but at least the brass plate is the same colour as the dial and the spandrels are of similar quality to the originals.
Cheers. 20210106_112624_resize_79.jpg

20210106_112631_resize_60.jpg
 
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P.Hageman

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Interesting, looks almost the same engraver. I really have no idea what the triple crown stands for. I wish there was a good answer for, the fact that it could have to do with William of Orange would be a nice thought for me as a Dutchmen :)
 

Errantly

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Interesting, looks almost the same engraver. I really have no idea what the triple crown stands for. I wish there was a good answer for, the fact that it could have to do with William of Orange would be a nice thought for me as a Dutchmen :)
I thought you might appreciate that. I was thinking along the lines of a souvenir coronation mug or jubilee tea towel
 

Errantly

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I thought you might appreciate that. I was thinking along the lines of a souvenir coronation mug or jubilee tea towel
Seriously though - it was a time of huge political upheaval (some of which is still being played out today thinking of Brexit and the implications of the border for Northern Ireland) and the people who could afford to have these clocks made would be keen to demonstrate their loyalties to their friends.
 

Errantly

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Seriously though - it was a time of huge political upheaval (some of which is still being played out today thinking of Brexit and the implications of the border for Northern Ireland) and the people who could afford to have these clocks made would be keen to demonstrate their loyalties to their friends.
There's a university thesis to write for someone 'Charting social and political changes within the UK through the development of of clock dials 1660 - 1840'
 
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DeanT

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P.Hageman

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DeanT

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How interesting! I think in earlier centuries, people where more aware of symbols and the meaning of them. However thinking of it, even today symbols are still a strong way of stating something. Just look at the symbols of multinationals like Mac.Donald etc.
Its fascinating. Every time I look again at these clocks I see something new I'd never noticed before. I've seen the three crowns discussed on several threads before and no one knew the reason behind it.
 

novicetimekeeper

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Very interesting. Thought you might like to see mine. Replacement case unfortunately. I wonder if the triple crown was to do with William of Orange becoming King of England, Ireland and Scotland in 1689. There was also the Oath of allegiance in 1688, he was titled William the third. All speculation on my part of course.
As you can see an arch was added to the dial quite early on which will mean finding a suitable case for it a real pain, but at least the brass plate is the same colour as the dial and the spandrels are of similar quality to the originals.
Cheers. View attachment 630958

View attachment 630957
I don't think those are crowns, but coronets.

 

Errantly

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I had no idea that an almost throw away comment would attract so much attention. It's been brilliant. The depth of thought and reasoning in this organisation is amazing. I don't suppose we'll ever know the reason for these crowns until contemporary documentary evidence is found. They certainly look like an Earl's coronet but I'm sure an amount of freedom was exercised in the interpretation of 'crowns' heraldic or otherwise. The engraving on these dials seems to have been executed with a conservation of effort quite like the commemorative tat that's been sold during my lifetime. Which is confusing since one would have thought that they would have had access to the finest London engravers. Maybe it would have been a cost too far. Those dial plates that have been engraved with coats of arms appear to have been very special one off commissions.
But as I said it's all speculation on my part. It's a pity we can't sit around a table and share a beer or two and discuss like friends do. But I really appreciate the feeling of community.
Cheers guys.
 
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novicetimekeeper

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As clocks were made to order it seems unlikely that the customers would not be aware of the difference between a crown and a coronet. I'm quite sure that they are coronets for a reason, it is a very specific design.
 

Errantly

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The hands on your clock are beautiful. Did you notice mine still has the outmoded half-quarter hour markers ?
 

P.Hageman

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This is indeed a very interesting subject. It would be highly suitable subject to discuss with a beer or islay whisky :) This is what I found on the web:

coronet.jpg
 

Errantly

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This is indeed a very interesting subject. It would be highly suitable subject to discuss with a beer or islay whisky :) This is what I found on the web:

View attachment 631203
Hi either would suit me just fine smilie (I don't know why my emoticons don't work). I'll raise a glass of malt to you later.
Yes I've been looking around too. This is why novice could be absolutely correct and he is obviously far more experienced than myself. I was making conjectures drawing in the wider political landscape of the time. 3 crowns - 3 kingdoms finally united under 1 monarch in 1689 etc.. To engrave 3 heraldic style sovereigns crowns would have been more costly. Even if Earl's they've missed the strawberry leaves. But I don't want to upset anyone I just felt I had something to add to the pot. It really is an impressive acquisition and the expert effort he is able to draw on is really beyond my means.
 

Errantly

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Yes, I did see. Its a nice dial, think same era as mine?
These dials seem to be very close together in date of manufacture. Thomas Bridge has dates of 1697 -1700 according to mr loomes though as he wasn't in the clockmakers company I would imagine tying dates down would be problematic. I think clocks magazine had an article on him some years ago. The subscription is too much for me.
 

Errantly

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These dials seem to be very close together in date of manufacture. Thomas Bridge has dates of 1697 -1700 according to mr loomes though as he wasn't in the clockmakers company I would imagine tying dates down would be problematic. I think clocks magazine had an article on him some years ago. The subscription is too much for me.
Heaven's I wish I could get my hands on your case to copy it. Working out incorporating my arch would be a challenge. I wouldn't want to change my dial the arch is part of it's history. Married very young lols.
 

zedric

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There's a university thesis to write for someone 'Charting social and political changes within the UK through the development of of clock dials 1660 - 1840'
Too late, it’s already been done, although the focus is on watches. there is even a book published from the thesis, although please don’t buy it, it was one of the most difficult and annoying books I’ve ever read, and I gave up long before the end - it is basically the PhD justification, and most of it is along the lines of “So and so forgot this bit and this other guy forgot to invoke this other thing and so what I am saying is new...”

In case you are interested the book title is “the changing face of early modern time, 1550 to 1770”
 
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Errantly

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Too late, it’s already been done, although the focus is on watches. there is even a book published from the thesis, although please don’t buy it, it was one of the most difficult and annoying books I’ve ever read, and I gave up long before the end - it is basically the PhD justification, and most of it is along the lines of “So and so forgot this bit and this other guy forgot to invoke this other thing and so what I am saying is new...”

In case you are interested the book title is “the changing face of early modern time, 1550 to 1770”
Thank you Zedric for taking one for the community. There was me thinking I was being humorous. Phd theses are a bit beyond me but anyone else reading this may want to take it further. I just enjoy looking at the pretties and musing lols.
 

DeanT

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Maybe, but to my eyes, too knotty, wrong grain??

My understanding was yew was found in England, Scotland & Ireland. Used extensively for furniture in UK.

RM
RM, yew was used extremely rarely on clock cases in the golden age of English horology. I found two examples of early longcases; By Stephens of London and the one below by Willis of Buckinghamshire. In addition I've found 4 bracket clocks; 2 by Richard Fennell, 1 by Knibb and another by Martin of Bristol.



1621073658366.png
 

novicetimekeeper

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RM, yew was used extremely rarely on clock cases in the golden age of English horology. I found two examples of early longcases; By Stephens of London and the one below by Willis of Buckinghamshire. In addition I've found 4 bracket clocks; 2 by Richard Fennell, 1 by Knibb and another by Martin of Bristol.



View attachment 654416
Well that's a very nice clock! :)
 

novicetimekeeper

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Nick, yew can say that again. ;)

Ralph
Groan, there have been yew jokes going backwards and forwards all week.

Burr yew is a rather special veneer, I'm pleased to play a small part in its future.
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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Here is Hugh, the Borg:

The borg hugh.jpg

Oh, wait. Wrong spelling. Not a tree.

My bad.

RM
 

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