Thinking about buy a grandfather clock that can be Passed down, but need advice.

Bruce Alexander

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I'm guessing that the OP knows his family pretty well.

I'm looking forward to getting more information on the kind of clock he, and perhaps his family, might be interested in looking for.

There is where we can attempt to answer his question(s).
 

aucaj

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I have always considered myself a custodian of my few watches and clocks. I believe I have a responsibility to eventually find new ownership with another enthusiast who will appreciate them; whether that be a family member or another collector. This is the best way to ensure their preservation for posterity. Unfortunately, I cannot expect that my relatives will have the same passion for horology.
 

Salsagev

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I have always considered myself a custodian of my few watches and clocks. I believe I have a responsibility to eventually find new ownership with another enthusiast who will appreciate them; whether that be a family member or another collector. This is the best way to ensure their preservation for posterity. Unfortunately, I cannot expect that my relatives will have the same passion for horology.
You have a point, this is the integrity all clock collectors should have.
 
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wspohn

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While it is nice to try and be the custodians of clock heritage, good luck trying to sell antique clocks or furniture these days - the interest in large part simply isn't there.

I've seen people declining lovely Victorian furniture that has lasted 150 years in favour of the equivalent of Ikea crap that will be land fill long before the antiques wear out, because they 'didn't want anything 'old'.

If you can find anyone interested in conserving the sort of things we collect, by all means let them help conserve what we have and appreciate.
 

aucaj

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While it is nice to try and be the custodians of clock heritage, good luck trying to sell antique clocks or furniture these days - the interest in large part simply isn't there.

I've seen people declining lovely Victorian furniture that has lasted 150 years in favour of the equivalent of Ikea crap that will be land fill long before the antiques wear out, because they 'didn't want anything 'old'.

If you can find anyone interested in conserving the sort of things we collect, by all means let them help conserve what we have and appreciate.

You make a good point. Markets and interest do fluctuate. But this would not be the first time. Consider the verge fusee watches of the 18th century. The Victorians valued them so little that they were removing the engraved balance cocks and bridges to make jewelry. Many fine watches were destroyed and trashed. For another example, I believe it was the Vulliamy family of watch and clock makers that completely replaced the mechanisms on a few Tompion bracket clocks with their own rather than repair them. Antiques will only become rarer and rarer as time goes on and more are lost in these fluctuations of interest and historical appreciation.

In the digital age, how do you get the next generation to appreciate the beauty of these analog mechanisms? I share your frustration.
 

wspohn

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I see the same thing in another of my hobbies, old sports cars.

Young people today in an urban situation not only don't care about driving for pleasure. they often don't care to own a car. We get the odd young guy wanting to own a 50 year old MG or some such and we older aficionados try to foster that interest, but for the most part we are a long, long way from the time when all a young guy could think about was owning his own car.
 
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aucaj

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I completely understand! This generation has rarely even seen a manual transmission; let alone knowing how to drive one! And nobody works on their own cars anymore either. Not that I can blame them. They are all designed using CAD software which allows for maximizing the space for the engine. You have to take half the engine apart to get to anything. My older cars have plenty of elbow room around the engine :)
 

Schatznut

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Let's cut 'em some slack, folks. We were once them and no doubt our elders said the same about us. Aristotle was griping about the younger generation in around 400BC, so we can assume this is a universal constant. If the younger generation is coming out so messed up, it's our faults - we blew it. Teach your children well...
 

Salsagev

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I’m a youngster too, and my clocks (the good ones) aren’t going anywhere anytime soon!

I don’t believe my parents got me into clocks. I was supported when I got interested. The problem I see is the constant fuss of moving on and “modernizing”.

If the market is so called “dead”, we can at least try to keep the hobby up and going.
 
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Bruce Alexander

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Hate to be a pessimist,
But you're so good at it! :chuckling:

Mechanical clocks, Furniture made with real wood and wood working skills, Cars with manual transmissions. They are all technological artifacts.

I can usually find new homes for clocks that I've serviced, and I service heirlooms from time to time. Doing so while avoiding a lo$$ can be a bit tricky at times. If one aims to make a living dealing in antiques, you better be very, very good at it. Fortunately we have such folks as regular contributors in the Forums.

You can't save them all, so just do what you can and enjoy the ones you do manage to save...is what I think.
 

shutterbug

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People buy what they remember seeing in Grandma's house. So antique sales often cater to "vintage" rather than antique. The same seems to happen with clocks. Collectors like the old stuff, but the younger generation don't. Spring powered clocks are phasing out of popularity rapidly. Weight driven clocks are hanging on by a fingernail. Telling time on an analog dial is not longer taught in school, and not taught at home either, so kids can't tell you what "a quarter to 9:00" even means. Sad, but time marches on.
 

wspohn

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We live in a pseudo Tudor hose with roots back to the 30s and full of my antiques and such. We also have a 1930s wall phone that functions.

We had a couple of twenty somethings come by and when they saw the phone, they had to ask how you use it.....

Neither of them wore watches - who needs them when they have a cellphone?

But I do get really tired of the local for sale ads purportedly selling 'antique clocks' and when you look at the pictures there is a big "Quartz" across the dial!
 

chimeclockfan

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Sometimes it's more interesting to talk about buying a clock, than it is to actually buy a clock. Hah.
 
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Royce

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I can't nor would I want to dispute anything previously said, but, IMHO the salient point has to do with the relationship between the parent and child/children and the associated sentimental value and memories the children may place on an object owned by the parent that they loved dearly (hopefully). I don't know how many threads that I have read on this site where the OP wants to know the value of the clock/watch/etc. but ultimately doesn't really care because the sentimental value was the far more important matter. It's simply a memory of a loved one. I am not naive to the fact that the younger generation values things differently than I do, but I also don't think they don't hold sentimental value and memories of possessions of their parents.
 

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