Thinking about buy a grandfather clock that can be Passed down, but need advice.

dairborn

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Thinking about buying a Grandfather clock. I was hoping to receive one that was in my grandparents house for years, but my sister ended up getting it. No hard feelings, but now I would like to get something that could be passed down to my children and generations beyond. With that being said, what would you purchase, or look to purchase. I am not really that concerned with valve, however i do find it interesting that modern clocks that sell for thousands in stores, seem to resell at a fraction of the cost later. Is it better to look for something older. I have always been amazed by a grandfather clock, old or new. I have a bunch of smaller mantle and wall clocks as a collector, but nothing in the tall case variety. What would you do in my shoes.? Thanks.
 

MuseChaser

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We are all different, and look for different things. When I was a lad (back in the late 60s/early 70s), my father and I built two grandfather clock kits from Emperor. I'm not looking forward to inheriting them because it'll mean he has passed on, but they will ALWAYS mean a great deal to me. I don't know if there are still kits available, but that would be my first recommendation if you're looking for something that would truly mean something. My second would be to seek out an older clock in poor but restorable condition... and restore it with your kids. Again.. then it would be YOUR clock, and not just a purchase.
 

bruce linde

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a couple of quick responses:

"that could be passed down"... for me, this rules out clocks less than about 100 years old. the ones you mention that sold for thousands but now litter craigslist for a couple of hundred bucks were built in the 1970s, using movements with a built-in shelf-life of 25-30 years. on the other hand, i just acquired a tall case clock (lucky craigslist/estate sale purchase) for under $500.... built in 1780 and still running. they don't make 'em like they used to.

while the rules prohibit discussion of active sale and auction items, you are welcome to private message me with for advice on anything you're considering. it can be hard to get me to opine (not really), but you should check out my clocks (bruce's CLOCKS) and definitely review posts by novicetimekeeper, who has amazing taste in tall case clocks... and then contrast those with the cheaper/newer listings on craigslist.

you have an opportunity to improve your eye, and make a more informed purchase, by using the message board as your own personal clock shopping research library.

go forth and shop!
 

Willie X

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You sure anyone actually wants a clock??

Clocks are only liked by older folks. Most younger folks could not care less.

Leave them a fat Roth IRA, or some solid mutual funds. Everybody likes those!

Willie X
 
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Salsagev

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Thinking about buying a Grandfather clock. I was hoping to receive one that was in my grandparents house for years, but my sister ended up getting it. No hard feelings, but now I would like to get something that could be passed down to my children and generations beyond. With that being said, what would you purchase, or look to purchase. I am not really that concerned with valve, however i do find it interesting that modern clocks that sell for thousands in stores, seem to resell at a fraction of the cost later. Is it better to look for something older. I have always been amazed by a grandfather clock, old or new. I have a bunch of smaller mantle and wall clocks as a collector, but nothing in the tall case variety. What would you do in my shoes.? Thanks.
I would stay away from the “contemporary” Grandfather clocks. Also, does it have to be a tall case clock? They are a bit difficult to deal with logistically compared to a large wall clock. I say to get one of those Grandfather clocks that have different melodies over the basic Westminster, Whittington, St Micheal chimes, if you want a somewhat modern one. Some older German ones produce a very nice, deep sound. What are your options?
Pick the one that connects with you.
 

zedric

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I note that you have a bunch of other clocks, but are looking for a tallcase, so I would definitely go with what you want.

My advice would depend on your budget, but I would defineitely go with an antique rather than a modern clock. There are options for hundreds, thousands, or tens of thousands of dollars (not so many above or below those limits) so know what you can spend... Then I would recommend learning as much as you can about them, so that you know what you are buying, and look at as many as you can in the price bracket you have (online is good, in person is so much better). And ask here about the types of things you like - we won't all agree, but you will get a range of opinions at least.

Then buy what appeals to you.

And finally, have fun - buying a clock should be an enjoyable experience..
 
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novicetimekeeper

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i think Willie has a point, if your aim is just to pass it on perhaps you should let your children choose?

I was always promised a longcase through inheritance so never bought one as that would make the inherited one an also ran. When that didn't happen I went out and bought one and that started a hobby that has filled our very small house with longcase, brackets, and dial clocks. (and they arent even all mine)

When I'm gone my partner will be faced with a disposal problem. (He is 21 years younger so pretty sure he will have the problem, not me with his vinyl record and memorabilia collection)

Your children may find a dial clock easier to live with, or if you want to go earlier a verge lantern, there is a reason why these two styles have maintained their value while longcase clock values have plummeted.

To me that makes them affordable though, which is why I have so many.
 

chimeclockfan

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The only clocks that will be passed down are those that merit enough intergenerational interest to avoid getting chopped up for scrap.
I've seen antique and modern clocks passed down, also antique and modern clocks that get chopped up.
 

Salsagev

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The only clocks that will be passed down are those that merit enough intergenerational interest to avoid getting chopped up for scrap.
I've seen antique and modern clocks passed down, also antique and modern clocks that get chopped up.
Exactly.
What I’m most afraid of is that large tall case clocks are hard to inherit. I commonly see listings that say “inherited from so and so and lost interest”. It’s either sold or tossed in the trash. Or you get someone will “repurposed” or chopped up like CCF says.
 

zedric

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I have always been amazed by a grandfather clock, old or new. I have a bunch of smaller mantle and wall clocks as a collector, but nothing in the tall case variety.
The above is from the OP, and it seems to me that you guys are forgetting what has been asked here.

Basically as I understand it, dairborn is looking for advice on a longcase clock he can buy and get enjoyment out of, and that will have enough interest for it to have the option to be handed down the line. I can’t see why you would want to steer him to other styles of clock when he wants a longcase and already has other styles of clock.

No-one can guarantee what the next generation wants, or what fashion will hold dear in even 10 years time. Anitiques could make a huge comeback. Stranger things have happened. So my thinking is go for something you enjoy or something very expensive. If your kids know you valued it and held it dear, either inherent value or sentimental value about the only things that will increase their desire for it.
 
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chimeclockfan

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something you enjoy
something very expensive
Not always synonymous with each other, tsk tsk. :chuckling:

As far as longcases go, we have so many threads from people asking others for opinions on "desirable" clocks to buy and there's never a clear and concise answer as to what really passes as "the best investment". Putting aside the purported-possibility of future inheritance, some factors to consider would include:

1. Looks.
2. Functionality.
3. Ease of access.
4. Age.
5. Chimes and strike if applicable.
6. Construction quality.
7. Originality: how much of the clock was unfettered.

It's all on you what type of longcase is going to be most desirable to you. There's really no one else who can tell you what to buy without simply crane-shunting their own preferences in the end. Personally, if I had to tell you concisely what type of clock to buy based on my preferences and experiences, you're looking at something like this:

31.jpg

The prospects of future inheritance with any clock are staunchly as described above in my other post. Wish I could say certain clocks will pertain eternal value and interest but that's just not how the cookie crumbles. All I can say is look around at different types of longcases - photos videos, ideally in-person at local dealers - and give it a good night or two to think about what you will really enjoy.
 

chimeclockfan

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Some assorted videos from a dealer showcasing different clocks. There are even more out there.
These were all sold years ago. Pick a favorite and get hunting like Elmer Fudd:

Colonial MFG with German movement, 1970s:


Elite hall clock with gong strike, 1900s:


Storr London musical clock from 18th century:


1800's longcase, give or take the date:


Herschede clock, 1980's:

 
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Dick C

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I would find one that does not cost an arm and a leg every time it needs to be repaired; one that does not to be repaired every 5 years or so. The bad ones are out there so beware!
 
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Salsagev

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I would find one that does not cost an arm and a leg every time it needs to be repaired; one that does not to be repaired every 5 years or so. The bad ones are out there so beware!
If that were the rule, avoid Hermle, Kieninger, Maybe Jauch, Maybe Urgos, and definitely Asian made mechanical tall cases!
 

Schatznut

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Start educating your heirs now so that they have the proper appreciation ingrained in their souls, if not their DNA, when the time comes. It's less about the clocks than it is about family. My grandfather did this with me when I was just a little tyke, and I inherited two clocks from him when he passed away - a Konrad Mauch 400-day and a small generic cuckoo clock. Neither worked. I fixed them. And that's what got me started in clock repair, restoration and collection. Wait a minute - this is all Grandpa's fault! :cool: I miss him.
 

Willie X

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Good luck on that "ingraining proper appreciation into their souls". Ha

Just buy what you will enjoy, with a written guarantee of coarse, and to heck with the kid/s. As already said, younger people have little to no interest in mechanical clocks.

You won't be able to control anything from the grave but I have seen attempts. Double Ha

Willie X
 

Royce

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The above is from the OP, and it seems to me that you guys are forgetting what has been asked here.

Basically as I understand it, dairborn is looking for advice on a longcase clock he can buy and get enjoyment out of, and that will have enough interest for it to have the option to be handed down the line. I can’t see why you would want to steer him to other styles of clock when he wants a longcase and already has other styles of clock.

No-one can guarantee what the next generation wants, or what fashion will hold dear in even 10 years time. Anitiques could make a huge comeback. Stranger things have happened. So my thinking is go for something you enjoy or something very expensive. If your kids know you valued it and held it dear, either inherent value or sentimental value about the only things that will increase their desire for it.
IMHO, well said!!
 
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Bruce Alexander

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I think a lot depends on the stages your family members are in. If the clock reminds them of good times, it will have sentimental value when it is time to settle your estate, or maybe you'll be downsizing and looking for a new home for your clock. I've seen inexpensive inherited clocks which were/are "worth" less than the costs involved in their periodic maintenance/repair. I've seen relatively expensive clocks on the auction block. Keep in mind that any mechanical clock for the home is a luxury now, and it will very much be a luxury in the future. Tall case clocks require space. Renters are probably not going to be interested in moving one in and out of some low-ceiling apartment.

Buy a nice antique for yourself if you want one. Keep in mind that it will need some maintenance, as all mechanical clocks do, as well as some repair of worn parts. Antiques were often made to be serviced. Some modern clocks were made to be used up and recycled.

Perhaps you can tell us more about your grandparents' clock. That could be a good starting point in finding a clock that is right for you.

Did it strike the hour and chime on the quarter hour? What did the clock sound like? If it was a chimer, what melody or melodies did it play? How tall do you remember it being? Do you have any photos of it? If not, could you get some?

It will take time to properly explore and define what you're looking for. If you'll be buying an antique, it will take time to find one that is in good shape, or one you can have repaired/restored as needed.

Personally, I like tubular bell clocks. Chime rod clocks can sound very, very nice too.

Prices for Tall Case Clocks have come down quite a lot over the last 10-15 years or so. Boomers are fading away and downsizing. Supply has been a lot higher than demand.

Get something you'll enjoy and celebrate the company of your family. Hopefully we'll all be putting Covid-19 in the rear-view mirror for good. Then I can take my Avatar's PPE off.
 

Willie X

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My Father always gave large cash presents. He said that it saved him a lot of shopping time and it always fit. :)

Note, He switched to checks when someone burned up all the Christmas wrapping paper along with their Christmas card with the Benjamins in it!

I can't imagine Him rambling around looking for something to "pass down" to his children ...

Willie X
 

chimeclockfan

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I agree it often benefits to give large sums of cash for the recipient to use as they please, especially in the current era.
Beats having a room full of "heirloom gifts" that were really bought on the cheap and serve no interest or value.
Some people say it's the thought that counts, I say the farts don't count.
 

MuseChaser

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Personally, I think if your heirs are only interested in your money, they don't deserve your money. If your kids and grandkids have been kind, loving, and helpful to you, there is of course nothing wrong with leaving them the aforementioned fat trust funds, Roths, etc. if that's the way you'd like to show your gratitude and love for the nice things they've done for you. On the other hand, if my kids and grandkids aren't interested in something that meant a great deal to me that I'd like to pass on as a rememberance of our lives together, i.e., something similar to the clock in question, then my interest in leaving them money is inversely proportional to their interest in receiving only money.... meaning, if that's all they want, then I have none to give. I'd like to think I mean more to my family than whatever amount of money I've managed to save.
 
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MuseChaser

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Good luck on that "ingraining proper appreciation into their souls". Ha

Just buy what you will enjoy, with a written guarantee of coarse, and to heck with the kid/s. As already said, younger people have little to no interest in mechanical clocks.

You won't be able to control anything from the grave but I have seen attempts. Double Ha

Willie X
As a lifelong public school music teacher, and now thankfully retired (although it was a rewarding career that allowed me to do a great deal of good for thousands of kids), I've heard similar arguments and railed against them many times. "You should let the kids play pop music... songs they know and like." "We should incorporate more and more computers into the classroom... the kids like it."

BULLCRAP. Our job, as adults, is to expose kids to stuff they are NOT aware of, and to teach them the finer things in life, or we are doomed. If the adults make decisions based upon what kids already like, why not just feed them nothing but sugar-frosted chocolate squares for every meal, let them watch all the porn they want, and let'em smoke crack... hey, a lot of them like it, I'm told. Ridiculous.

I took the complete opposite road. We played and listened to nothing but music that has TRULY stood the test of time... meaning hundreds of years in many cases. My students learned to love and appreciate it. Some quite quickly, most took a lot of time to get there, and yes, as Willie suggested, there were a few who never "got it.' However, those few failures are NOT a reason to give up on all young people.

Definitely buy a clock you'll enjoy... that's good advice. Don't pick something you think your heirs will like, pick something that will mean something to YOU. THEN.... let them know, over time, why that clock is something special to you, to the folks who made it, how it has survived for so long due to receiving good care, or remedial care after neglect to bring it back to life....and maybe, just maybe your heirs will be all the better for it, grow to appreciate it, and start to care for things other than immediate gratification, if they don't already.

As I think I said in an earlier post, I think selecting a clock with the idea of it remaining in the family for generations is a BEAUTIFUL idea. I would be very surprised if, after a few years of seeing you enjoy it, at least one of your heirs didn't come to feel the same way.

As the pop song said years ago, paraphrased, "Don't give up on them, ba....by....."......
 

MuseChaser

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We have 1000's of customers, & 98% said there children & grandchildren didn't want there clock's when they pass.
I currently have 43 clocks running in my house. I only have three kids. I can certainly understand none of them wanting fourteen or fifteen clocks. However, if I were to pick out three that were very special to me, one for each of them, and they told me they weren't interested, that would allow me to donate a HUGE sum of money to some of my favorite charities instead of passing it on to my kids. Thankfully, I can't imagine any of them being that cold.
 

novicetimekeeper

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The reason for suggesting other clock styles is about leaving stuff to the kids, if you have always wanted a longcase go for it. Personally I would say go for the oldest and best you can afford, because otherwise you run the risk of being dissatisfied with it later.
 

Bruce Alexander

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What I really find kind of sad is that here we are an association of folks who love all things "clocks", telling this guy to forget about passing down a nice Tall Case. I can fully understand and appreciate all of the great contributions made to this thread. There's a lot of truth in all of it. We're always happy to find a new home for a clock. The alternative is not a pretty picture. I hope our O.P. finds what he's looking for. Maybe he (or she) can involve their grandchildren/children in the selection process.
 
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Dick C

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What I really find kind of sad is that here we are an association of folks who love all things "clocks", telling this guy to forget about passing down a nice Tall Case. I can fully understand and appreciate all of the great contributions made to this thread. There's a lot of truth in all of it. We're always happy to find a new home for a clock. The alternative is not a pretty picture. I hope our O.P. finds what he's looking for. Maybe he (or she) can involve their grandchildren/children in the selection process.
I think that most of the comments are only expressing reality.
 

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My daughter, in her 20's, asked me if I would pick a clock out of my collection for her. Knowing her tastes, I chose a Kundo oval clock I'd restored several years ago. She has it in a position of prominence in her apartment and knows how to level it, wind it, set it and tweak the regulation should it be necessary. 'Nuff said.
 

Bruce Alexander

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I think that most of the comments are only expressing reality.
No arguments from me. We are certainly expressing our individual takes on reality anyway.
'Nuff said.
Not quite.
We have a daughter who has gladly taken two clocks for her apartment.
Thanks to chimeclockfan, I've identified this one as a Junghans "Melody" Westminster:
AsListed.jpg
She really liked the looks of it. It's not what I would pick for myself, but she's happy with it and that's all that matters to us.
This was the original family it belonged to. One of their heirs sold it to me
Original Family.jpg

Laurel also selected a Seth Thomas "Tori"
Front.JPG

She has lived in Pittsburgh, Nashville and St. Paul.

What she doesn't know yet is that we have the following clocks for her to deal with once we're gone:

Front.jpg
Front.jpg

Front.jpg

I've serviced the St. Paul. I've yet to go over the Pittsburgh and Nashville.

I hope she has room for them. In any case, she'll know what we paid for them if she goes to sell. Hopefully they'll still have some value in the market.

Regards,

Bruce
 

bruce linde

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has anyone suggested getting the kids involved in the shopping process? find out what style(s) of clock they resonate with and would like to keep in the family? my nieces took a tour of my clocks and stated their prefs... not sure what i'll do with the dozens of other clocks, but still! :)
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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Thinking about buying a Grandfather clock. I was hoping to receive one that was in my grandparents house for years, but my sister ended up getting it. No hard feelings, but now I would like to get something that could be passed down to my children and generations beyond. With that being said, what would you purchase, or look to purchase. I am not really that concerned with valve, however i do find it interesting that modern clocks that sell for thousands in stores, seem to resell at a fraction of the cost later. Is it better to look for something older. I have always been amazed by a grandfather clock, old or new. I have a bunch of smaller mantle and wall clocks as a collector, but nothing in the tall case variety. What would you do in my shoes.? Thanks.
You mention "children". Are you planning to leave just one clock to them? Which child would you choose to receive the clock? If one clock is left to all, that can lead to difficulties/conflict. Or, would you give a clock to each?

By the way, as mentioned already, the problem is often that the "kids" aren't interested in the antiques that their parents or grandparents owned except for what's it worth and how much can they get for it. Your children must be different.

RM
 

Willie X

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Yep, reality is reality and sentimentality happens (or not) over time. You can't make it happen.

Tea's 98% seems about right to me.

Willie X
 

MuseChaser

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Yep, reality is reality and sentimentality happens (or not) over time. You can't make it happen.

Tea's 98% seems about right to me.

Willie X
Well, that may be true... But you can certainly chooseto reward those who value something other than money,.....or not to reward a lack of appreciation of the finer things in life!
 
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Willie X

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I'm just not very much into the 'controlling' thing. :) Back to the clocks for me. Willie X
 

Bruce Alexander

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has anyone suggested getting the kids involved in the shopping process?
Yes. I was thinking that our O.P. may want to see if any of their heirs have an interest

Maybe he (or she) can involve their grandchildren/children in the selection process.
would you give a clock to each?
Yes. I think so. If they choose not to keep them they can sell them, of course. They should know what you paid for them The clock's market value may have depreciated considerably, but at least the heir will know how much you valued the heirloom clock they inherited.

In the meantime, you get to enjoy them during your lifetime. I don't know where the percentages come from. So far that hasn't been my experience. We have five children. Four of them have asked for clocks from our collection. The fifth one won't be in our wills anyway, but that has nothing to do with clocks. :( He would/will be the one looking for money. Too bad. As far as I'm concerned we're batting 100.
 
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dairborn

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Some assorted videos from a dealer showcasing different clocks. There are even more out there.
These were all sold years ago. Pick a favorite and get hunting like Elmer Fudd:

Colonial MFG with German movement, 1970s:


Elite hall clock with gong strike, 1900s:


Storr London musical clock from 18th century:


1800's longcase, give or take the date:


Herschede clock, 1980's:

So cool. the bells were really neat to listen too, but that first one was my favorite, such a rich sound.
 

dairborn

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I would find one that does not cost an arm and a leg every time it needs to be repaired; one that does not to be repaired every 5 years or so. The bad ones are out there so beware!
Care to name any brand to stay away from. feel free to send your opinions in a pm.......thanks
 

dairborn

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So sorry everyone, taken me a minute to get back here....I appreciate everyone's honest opinion. I am trying to get my sister to send me a few pictures of my Grandparent's Clock. I will be happy to share it. That's was really where it all started for me. Both my grandparents had clocks that very cool and they are just great memories for me. What I failed to mention, while I did not get the tall case clock, what I did get is my grandmother's Seth Thomas Brookfield Banjo Clock. (at least that's what I think it is) It's currently in the shop being worked on. I want it restored to fully working order so I figured let a pro handle it. Honestly, I am not sure what I want for a tall case clock I love the look of the modern clocks, but from what I hear, and not that I am surprised, they just don't make em like they used to. Funny because I collect Coleman Lanterns and stoves, and the same can be said with those. The older ones are just better. So I would like to find an older one, even an antique that I could enjoy I suppose. As far a my children go, 9 and 11, we talk all the time about having things passed down. They enjoy stuff that I have received from my folks and we talk about tradition and how important it is to carry from generation to generation. I guess we are a little old school. IMG_0528.jpg Now, will that stick, who knows? But I know I am going to do what i can while I am here and what they do with it is up to them. I know they love the stories I tell about the past with my family. Hopefully one day when I am long gone, they will have something I leave behind that will share similar memories that I was left with too.
 

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The first and most important consideration is, "What kind of tall case clock to you personally like and want to see in your home?" That in itself can cover a very wide area. I would look for an antique clock made before 1920. I personally favor American clocks, but there are some very nice German tall clocks, and tons of English tall clocks out there. Currently, prices for tall case clocks are depressed, but that pendulum will swing back as styles and tastes change. Clock prices are influenced by changes in home decor, prevailing tastes, and fashion, which is very fickle. Take your time looking. When you find the ONE that is really special to you, and after your kids realize how special it is to you, it will become important to them. That's how family heirlooms evolve.

Go out to liveauctioneers.com and enroll, it's free. Once enrolled, you can keyword search current and upcoming auctions for tall case clocks for sale. More importantly, you can also search their past auction data base for clocks that sold over the last several years, and get an idea of what your dream tall clock might look like and cost. Hope this helps, and happy hunting.
 
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Hate to be a pessimist, but very few of the younger generation are even interested in owning a watch ("Why would I need one - I just look at my phone?")

I collect watches, clocks, restore old sports cars, and live in a house full of antique furniture. Younger generations simply don't care.

I did a lot of estate work before retiring as a practicing solicitor, and I don't think I can recall any of the beneficiaries I dealt with caring one whit about the 'old stuff' their deceased parents had left, except when more than one of them decided to get into a jealousy fit because they didn't want a sibling to get a certain item even though they didn't really want it. The only question they ever asked was "How much is it worth?"

BTW, the way I always settled the jealousy fits between two or more children by having the item valued and tell them what an item was worth and that if everyone agreed they could have it but would get it in lieu of $X in cash. That normally cooled their ardour rather effectively when they realized they'd have to essentially buy it from the estate. Similarly when I told them that the auction would be on a certain date and they could all go and bid against each other to see who really wanted it the most, not one took me up on it.

To the OP, if your descendants really will want and will value and care for a clock, I agree with the advice the others gave you - don't bother with 20th century depreciating clocks, buy something that will have at least some lasting value and utility.
 
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MuseChaser

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Feb 5, 2019
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Hate to be a pessimist, but very few of the younger generation are even interested in owning a watch ("Why would I need one - I just look at my phone?")

I collect watches, clocks, restore old sports cars, and live in a house full of antique furniture. Younger generations simply don't care.

I did a lot of estate work before retiring as a practicing solicitor, and I don't think I can recall any of the beneficiaries I dealt with caring one whit about the 'old stuff' their deceased parents had left, except when more than one of them decided to get into a jealousy fit because they didn't want a sibling to get a certain item even though they didn't really want it. The only question they ever asked was "How much is it worth?"

BTW, the way I always settled the jealousy fits between two or more children by having the item valued and tell them what an item was worth and that if everyone agreed they could have it but would get it in lieu of $X in cash. That normally cooled their ardour rather effectively when they realized they'd have to essentially buy it from the estate. Similarly when I told them that the auction would be on a certain date and they could all go and bid against each other to see who really wanted it the most, not one took me up on it.

To the OP, if your descendants really will want and will value and care for a clock, I agree with the advice the others gave you - don't bother with 20th century depreciating clocks, buy something that will have at least some lasting value and utility.
Thank you, Prince of Darkness....

Edit... I tried to add some smilies to make sure it was said in jest, but it didn't work....

Edit...
 

wspohn

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Thank you, Prince of Darkness....
Just trying to be responsive to the original question. I've probably had far more experience in a few decades of estate practice than a layman would ever get.

Better to ask the kids if they want a clock and hope that they tell you the truth, not just what they think you want to hear.
 

Chris Radano

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I have more heirloom quality clocks than my parents (both still living). In fairness, my parents aren't interested in clocks. But it's funny when my mother comes to visit, see is amazed at my little James Muirhead Glasgow highly carved oak Victorian bracket clock (I think she wants that one).
Out of all my family, including siblings and in-laws, my mother and I appear to be the only collectors. My mother collects paintings, but I don't like her taste ;)
Actually, my wife's aunt has gathered some stuff. So us three.
 
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Salsagev

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I have noticed, when buying, that some middle aged seller will likely sell something for lower of a price and rather sell faster. Thats most of my sellers.
The younger sellers, is usually a different story. They usually say something like this “had it appraised and easily worth more than (my already high asking price)”.
 

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