Theodore Crom's Horological Tools books - which one to get?

Discussion in 'Horological Tools' started by rstl99, Jun 13, 2018.

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  1. rstl99

    rstl99 Registered User
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    Oct 31, 2015
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    I would like to get a copy of one of Crom's books on horological tools.
    My interest is mainly in English and continental watchmaking in the 18th century.

    I see that Crom published several books, which sound a bit similar, and I understand consist mainly of reproductions of contemporary tool catalogues.

    Which one would you say would be the best for me to buy, assuming I were only to buy one? I am leaning to number 3.

    Thanks.

    1. Early Lancashire horological tools and their makers (275pp)

    2. Horological and other shop tools 1700 to 1900 (388pp)

    3. Horological shop tools 1700 to 1900 (678pp)
     
  2. PatH

    PatH Registered User
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    I can't really speak to a recommendation, but to help with your purchase decision, the NAWCC library likely has copies that as an NAWCC member you could check out. Also, you can go to the Library tab on the NAWCC web page, then Library Catalog on the left, enter Theodore Crom in the search at the top, and you will be able to see all of the resources in their holdings by Dr Crom, as well as a scan of the TOC and in some cases, the index. It looks like there are also some videos of his presentations that can be checked out.

    Pat
     
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  3. rstl99

    rstl99 Registered User
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    Thanks Pat. Yes I am a NAWCC member but live in Canada. I assume that means I don't have library checkout privileges, but should check out just in case.
    Best regards.
     
  4. rstl99

    rstl99 Registered User
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    Just to add: I read the guidelines and am able to lend out books from the library (at higher mailing costs than US members of course), so will pursue the matter with library staff.
    Thank you again for the suggestion Pat, best regards,
    --Robert
     
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  5. Jerry Kieffer

    Jerry Kieffer Registered User
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    Robert

    Its an interesting topic, but a very difficult topic in that I suspect I personally take a quite different approach than most others.

    It depends on what you are looking for.

    During this era, for the most part, making of watches was done by the cottage industry methods. In these cases, one can think of ways specific parts could have been made, but no one really knows for sure how the best parts were made since the maker took his methods to the grave since it was his or her lively hood.

    On the other hand, there were those that repaired watches. In these cases, more is known and recorded since more common tools were used and often marketed with some useful and some not so much so as is still the case today.

    Again personally, I find that metal working is metal working regardless of what is being made. When researching construction methods, I have found the late 1800`s metal working and engineering handbooks have contained more information by often referring to methods used in various ways including Horology.

    However, if collecting information, why not one of everything.

    Jerry Kieffer
     
  6. rstl99

    rstl99 Registered User
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    Thank you Jerry, I hadn't thought of that perspective about cottage industry workers having "secret methods" they either handed down to a son or took to the grave.
    And it's good indeed to realize that not all the tools shown in those old catalogues were as useful as others. Some were likely a little too elaborate and sophisticated for their needs.
    Good suggestion about metalworking and engineering handbooks, and those old books are likely cheaper than equivalent books on horological tools (all things horology being priced at a premium it seems).
    Best regards,
    --Robert
     
  7. Firegriff

    Firegriff Registered User
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    Sounds like 3 books that need a reprinting with the prices that the originals command.
     
  8. Ralph B

    Ralph B Registered User

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    Last time I checked, Ted Crom's son was selling these at a very reasonable price.
    I'm guessing he still has a few of them but he doesn't attempt to sell them on Ebay, or elsewhere.
    Don't recall his details but didn't take a lot of searching to find a number to call.

    I have "2", and "3", both of which I got directly from him, and both of which were extremely good value at his prices.

    Ralph.
    N.Z.
     

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