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The Standard Electric Time Co.

paddycake

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Feb 7, 2010
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I recently acquired two Standard Electric Time Co. Clocks. One has a manufacturing & guarantee sticker listing it's production date as 1910 and Waterbury Ct. on the clock face. Also on the clock face the # 37 is hand lettered in ink. The other clock is lettered 306. I am assuming these are the production numbers. One of the clock works is stamped, Standard Electric Time Co. Pat. 1887. I know nothing about clocks, don't hate me. However these clocks are very cool and in good condition. I am thinking that they must be pretty near the advent of electric clock production in the US since electricity wasn't readily available in the US until the late 1880's. I am wondering if they are rare, or valuable, collectable or any other information anyone may have about them. Any information will be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
PH
 

Steven Thornberry

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PH: Let me move this to our Electric Clocks forum, where the experts lurk. Although we can't discuss specific values, we should be able to provide some good information.
 

harold bain

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PH, welcome to the message board. Post a few pictures of what you have, and we can likely give you some information about them.
 

paddycake

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Feb 7, 2010
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PH: Let me move this to our Electric Clocks forum, where the experts lurk. Although we can't discuss specific values, we should be able to provide some good information.
I have plenty of pic. but don't know how to attach them, I'm looking for a "paperclip" How do I import pics.? Also How can I tell if what I have is a "slave" clock, if that is the correct term.
Help
PH
-> posts merged by system <-
I think I just replied to the wrong post. But the reply went to the thread. I am not, as is probably obvious not too computer savvy.
 

harold bain

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After you open the reply to thread, scroll down to manage attachments. Then browse your computer to find your pictures, and attach them one at a time.
 

harold bain

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Paddycake, they are slave clocks. They need a master clock to supply a pulse once a minute to advance them. I have a similar one that works on 12 volts DC, but some are more and some are less. They aren't terribly rare, or valuable, but they do make for interesting clocks. Would have been installed in public buildings, like schools, hospitals or factories.
One of our members has made up electronic pulsers to run these clocks using a battery. Contact him at:
http://www.kensclockclinic.com/
 

paddycake

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Feb 7, 2010
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Thanks Harold. This is a very cool web site. I picture functions are amazing.
Thanks for the info.
 

eskmill

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Paddycake:

Your photos of the two SET slave clocks reveal two very early examples. The Waterbury address is rarely seen on SET clocks. Too, the name and patent date on the back of the movement is also evidence of early examples.

Hang onto 'em.
 

paddycake

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Feb 7, 2010
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Thanks for the input Les. Did I mention one of the clocks has a manufacturing label dated, 1/23/10. I assume the hand lettered #'s above the dial on the face of the clocks are production #s. Do you think the #39 means this is the 39th clock they made or #39 for the year 1910. The other clock lost the sticker but is marked #608. And as every answer brings with it the gift of a new question, is there a difference between a slave clock and a SET slave clock. What is the significance of the designation SET?
Thanks Again
PH
 

Attachments

eskmill

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'Sorry Paddycakes. My error. SET is an abbreviation for the Standard Electric Time Company.

Your clocks are old but of the case styles made after 1900. Take a look at Jeffrey Wood's collection at the URL below.

http://clockhistory.com/setclocks/old-advertisements/index.html
 

Richard T.

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I think the SET is for Standard Electric Time....... I see Les has already posed.....

Seems that I didn't read page two.


Best,

Richard T.
 

paddycake

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Feb 7, 2010
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Thanks again Les. The clock history site was great too.
Any insight or interpretation of the hand lettered numbers on the clock dial, the 39, 308?
 

eskmill

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Paddycake. The numbers in chalk, wax or grease pencil are most likely some kind of "match number" or arbitrary item number put on the inside of the case by the joiner who made the cases.

It is very common to find "match numbers" on wood and metal cases especially when there are two or more pieces comprising the case and there are ten, twenty or a hundred or more cases in a "production run". Both pieces are marked with an identifying number during the first phases of construction. Later after the pieces are varnished and polished, the carefully fitted parts of the case are reassembled with a perfect fit. In this way, there's little fiddling with hinges and latches after they're polished.

However, I suspect the numbers on your two examples are more likely a kind of carpenter shop serial number. Such numbers sometimes identify the craftsman who made, fitted or finished the case. Other uses would identify '"number 38" of a lot of 50 cases for example.

It is not usual for the numbers or symbols to be so large. More often the numbers are small, embossed into the wood or metal with a steel punch.

Roman numerals are regularly found as well as odd symbols.

Good question.
 

paddycake

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Feb 7, 2010
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Thanks again Les. Your better than Wikipedia. By the way I'm not really a collector of clocks as such, I'm a wood worker by nature and an inveterate treasure hunter by inclination. When I find something unusual and of obvious quality or antiquity I generally pass it on through Ebay or a tag sale. I don't look to get rich doing this but I do get great pleasure finding objects a new home where they will be appreciated & valued. As a retired clinician I spent a career seeking and usually finding value in people that society was willing to consign to the trash heap. And now I guess I do the same thing with Stuff. This of course supports my treasure hunting and sometimes I find a magnificent wood working tool for me. I also invariably wind up with a great education doing this. Thanks so much for being a part of this process.
So now that I know what I have here I'll be passing it on to someone who can appreciate it even more than me.
Thanks Again
PH
 

Jeffrey R. Wood

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Aug 27, 2000
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www.clockhistory.com
The small hand-written figures in ink just above XII indicate that the clock was used on a citywide rental system which kept records of each timepiece. Among the many telephone and telegraph wires strung up on poles in the late nineteenth century were usually time service wires connected to a central station master clock which got its time by telegraph or from a nearby observatory.

Please note that one of the movements shown has four screws near the bottom. The screw nearest the center is for adjusting tension on the coiled spring (not shown) which drives the hands forward each minute when the electromagnet releases. Only the very first of these slave movements were made this way. I would put the date of this one at around 1890.

Both of these movements are of the "SERIES" type and should be able to run independently of a system on as little as 1.5 volts DC. Their cases appear to be of somewhat later vintage (circa 1910). I have seen other instances of rental clocks with recycled components.
 

paddycake

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Feb 7, 2010
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Wow, That is great information, I love you guys. Thanks Jeff for that detailed information. 19th century High Tech. and it's marketing is fascinating stuff. This clock was going to be thrown out, I just don't know what's wrong with some people.
Thanks Again
PH
 

John Sidlauskas

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Oct 25, 2020
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Wow! I love the engravings on the movements, you rarely see those on later versions. I have early versions with the green sleeving on the coils. No name on the movement but still nice, also the wiring is so different from mine, mine has it going off to the side of the case at an angle and attached is a shunt, no signs of that brass clamp as seen on yours! WAY COOL!
 
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