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The Sessions clock - bushings

Times

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Aug 29, 2020
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I had replaced several worn bushings on the identical and similar clocks using American Made #L-43 & L-40 Brass Bushings.

On this movement, however, these large bushings are worn (oval shape), and they look different from those above. They appear to be riveted or, perhaps, two pieces inserted into each other? It's hard to tell as I did not clean the plates yet.

How do I replace these particular bushings? Thanks

Sessions bushings - Copy.PNG
 

wow

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Jun 24, 2008
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I had replaced several worn bushings on the identical and similar clocks using American Made #L-43 & L-40 Brass Bushings.

On this movement, however, these large bushings are worn (oval shape), and they look different from those above. They appear to be riveted or, perhaps, two pieces inserted into each other? It's hard to tell as I did not clean the plates yet.

How do I replace these particular bushings? Thanks

View attachment 672794
Some people turn them 190 degrees in the plate so the wear is on the original side. I have some bushings that are that large but if not, I make them on my lathe. I replace them when really oblong.
 

Times

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Aug 29, 2020
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Some people turn them 190 degrees in the plate so the wear is on the original side. I have some bushings that are that large but if not, I make them on my lathe. I replace them when really oblong.
I can try to rotate them 180 degrees. For now I made some light marks on the plate to note the true center. The bushings that you make - are they friction fit like any others, or do you use a staking tool to rivet them?

It looks either like a 2-piece bushing, or riveted bushing. And, I guess, it would be helpful to use right terminology for those bushings: Time Bushings for Winding Arbour?
 
Last edited:

wow

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Jun 24, 2008
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I remove the old bushing and use it(except for the bore) as a template to make the new bushing. I have hollow bushing stock that works well. Just turn it to the size you need for friction fit. Measure the pivot on the winding arbor and drill or bore it to the size you need. They are not two piece bushings. They just have a lip on the outside on some movements. There is lots of pressure on that arbor so the extra thickness slows wear.
 
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Times

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Aug 29, 2020
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I remove the old bushing and use it(except for the bore) as a template to make the new bushing. I have hollow bushing stock that works well. Just turn it to the size you need for friction fit. Measure the pivot on the winding arbor and drill or bore it to the size you need. They are not two piece bushings. They just have a lip on the outside on some movements. There is lots of pressure on that arbor so the extra thickness slows wear.
A lip similar to one on the balance staff in wristwatches? It has to be riveted to stay in place (in most cases). Thank you for your help.
 

Times

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Aug 29, 2020
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Hello Times,

Timesavers sells these in a variety of sizes. Look up "brass winding arbor bushings on their website.

Jim
Thank you Jim. That set of four is not the right size for my clock, but I will keep searching other on-line stores using "winding arbor bushings" key-phrase. ODs and IDs in that 4-pack are wrong for my clock. Only one size can work out if I enlarge ID with a proper size broach and reamer: 9.9mm O.D. x 4.0mm I.D, but I would also have to reduce OD of the bushings.
 

wow

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Jun 24, 2008
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A lip similar to one on the balance staff in wristwatches? It has to be riveted to stay in place (in most cases). Thank you for your help.
I don’t do watches so I don’t know about balance staffs on them. You will probably not find the exact bushing already made at supply houses. It is easier to make bushings that size. You can order hollow brass stock and make it if you have a lathe.
 
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Times

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Aug 29, 2020
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Are you encouraging me to start using my recently purchased old Unimat SL1000 lathe?! :)
Probably it's time to get all necessary accessories for it. The lathe looks good on my desk, but without the belts and accessories it's not very useful. I bought it in July and still reading the Operator's manual.
 

wow

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Jun 24, 2008
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Pineville, La. (central La.)
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Are you encouraging me to start using my recently purchased old Unimat SL1000 lathe?! :)
Probably it's time to get all necessary accessories for it. The lathe looks good on my desk, but without the belts and accessories it's not very useful. I bought it in July and still reading the Operator's manual.
I have an old Unimat SL. It will make those bushings. Yep. Good old lathes. I use a Sherline now. Gave the SL to my wife for her craft/jewelry making shop.
 

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