The market for Swedish "antique" and "rare" cartel clocks?

jacobsthlm

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Apr 30, 2013
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As there is possible to speak of value in a general speaking term and not any specific klock, I want to ask about this.

I just be accident stumled on a clock on eBay and in this case they named them "ANTIQUE SWEDISH" Cartel clock and I have also seen them as "RARE 19th LOUIS XVI" Cartel clock. The prices for these clocks are totally freaked out compered with what I know of the Swedish market. Is this just some sellers who hope they should score big by chans or can the market really be so diffrent? There is no problem at all finding a working cartel clock that is exactly the same as these, but I can find them without any problems for 10-20% of what they ask for them on eBay....

There is absolutly no way they can be described as "Rare". I can buy 20 of them tomorrow without any struggle.


I'm NOT asking this as in I'm going in to do buissnes buying and selling clocks. That is not anything I can or want to do. I'm asking this as I got very supprised when finding just a few and very expencive clocks spread around the world from Australia to UK and US and not what I was expected, many cheap old clocks that no one seems to want anymore as in Sweden...

Regards
Jacob

P.S As I'm not speaking of any specific clock I'm not showing any pictures but anyone can find these clocks on eBay using those phrases.
 

Burkhard Rasch

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I guess You speak of Westerstrand,Hasselblad and similar wooden Cartell clocks.They are good quality clocks,but out of Sweden not widely known,and-in Sweden-underestimated IMHO. With the general disapearance of good affordable mechanical clocks they rise in the last years and will rise more in the future.They fetch allmost twice as much in Germany than in Sweden and I guess the price goes up the farer away from Sweden You look.
I´m glad I have mine example.
Burkhard
 

Stan S

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As the previous poster said, the ferther from the source the more expensive and rarer the item. I live in Florida, there are Mango and coconut trees everywhere. The fruit falls off and rots on the ground, In your country these items are mostly likely rare and expensive.

Also some who post on auction sites are "fishing" for an unwary buyer who will believe the description and pay to much.

You may want to consider purchasing some of these clocks and put them away for a future investment. Buying low and selling high is a good formula for financial success! :D
 

jacobsthlm

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Yes Stan, I already buy more clocks then I need just because they are cheap and I like them. My biggest issue is that I need to learn how to clean them as my own clocks all will need that sooner or later and that many of the cheapest clocks don't work ju because they need to be cleaned. I tried ta ask about this in a thread in this forum showing a clock I have that is not wotking and needs to get cleaned. The only respons I got was one person who told me that my clock was far to good for beeing destoyd by me....
 

Stan S

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Yes Stan, I already buy more clocks then I need just because they are cheap and I like them. My biggest issue is that I need to learn how to clean them as my own clocks all will need that sooner or later and that many of the cheapest clocks don't work ju because they need to be cleaned. I tried ta ask about this in a thread in this forum showing a clock I have that is not wotking and needs to get cleaned. The only respons I got was one person who told me that my clock was far to good for beeing destoyd by me....
It sounds like we are both in the same boat, I am new to clock collecting and would like to be able to maintain my collection or be able to repair a broken one. I recently bough a nice crystal regulator that needed work and wanted to get it running. I got a book on clock repair and after reading some of it I decided to take the advice on the first page and took it to a qualified clock guy. :)

I have a simpler clock coming that I got for $35.00 to practice on to develop some basic skills. There is a wealth of information here and a lot of very helpful members. Don't get discouraged, and keep buying those clocks.:)
 

jacobsthlm

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I did a new check on the net here in Sweden and found one, as the same modell as I mention in this thread and it costs $7. That is insain...

Well, repairing them is one thing and cleaning them something ells. I'm not talking about taking them apart cleaning every piece, just some basic stuff with some old t-shirt, some type of cleaning device and som clock oils put in the right spots. I don't really care if I will break one as the other option is that they will just lie in a box without beeing able to run at all...
 
Last edited:

soaringjoy

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Jacob, it is NAWCC policy and thus policy of the Message Board, that antique and vintage clocks are to be
preserved and handled properly.
We cannot support a method of clock movement cleaning, which is sometimes call "Duncan Swish", an idiom
for "dunk and swish", meaning a movement is cleaned in one way or another without disassembly.
The proper way and state of the art is to disassemble the movement fully (including springs) before cleaning.
Only this ensures, that dirt and grime are cleaned out of all the crevices, essential for a good working movement.

Of course, it's easy to tear a movement down to its parts. It is the reassembly that is the harder part and some
basic knowledge is required to set-up a movement properly.
There are numerous books on the topic that can be read for understanding, for example, see here:

https://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php...air-and-building&highlight=clock+repair+books
 

jacobsthlm

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I can understand if you and other members of NAWCC think this way but this forum is full of diffrent people with diffrent background and knowledge of clocks and it just has to be other who see this different. I can't see that you can speak for everyone at this forum about this, as it sounds. Besides, if it was totally impossible to Clean them without damage them completely there should be no expression called "Duncan Swish"...

I know there are real clockmakers and firmes here in Sweden that offer a fixed price for cleaning a clock and those prices I have seen can not possible be for disassemble the movement fully, that can't cost around $150. So I want to learn a little of those metods. What is the harm in that? I love my clocks to and don't want to mess them up, but at the same time there is a learning curve to anything in life and I will surly destroy more clocks doing it without any help then I will with it...
 

soaringjoy

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You might want to realize, that the term "Duncan Swish" is rather ironical and cynical; it is used by
clockmakers and clock repairers in regards to poor workmanship.
"Cleaning" an assembled movement is like filling in fresh oil to your car engine, without getting rid of the
old oil first.
Old grime does not always dissolve by itself or by use of cleaning liquids, old grime in combination with fresh oil
becomes abrasive and will damage the movement on a mid-term basis.
Bushings have to be pegged out and pivots have to be examined to see damage. This is not possible without movement
disassembly.
It is of course nothing but your own choice to accept my argues or not.
 

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