The Future of Clock Collecting

RAK

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Jun 22, 2004
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The future of clock collecting is great!!! Looks like fewer people will be doing it so the folks who love them in the future will be able to collect clocks most of us only dreamed of owning, and do so for very very reasonable prices.

On the other hand, the future of clocks, especially ones in poor condition, may be bleak. With fewer collectors to hold on to them and save them from the trash heap/bin/fire pit/etc. they will likely face disposal. Fewer clock collectors also means fewer people in the repair business making repairs costly while clock values continually trend downward.

Two sides of the same coin.

Bob
 

tomrsey

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Jul 27, 2002
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I bought my first clock in 1970. Joined NAWCC A few years later. I loved the mechanical side probably more than the case designs, and, at the urging of my mentor became a state Certified Horologist (as was required by state law at the time). I was part of the Great Lakes Chapter which was very active at the time. I was active in the chapter and its members became a “second family”. The meetings were an important part of my clock collecting. I focused on American made clocks. Budget concerns were a big part of that, and obviously had very few of the higher end clocks. But each clock was special. It was purchased because something about it intrigued me.

Wes then moved to another state after I retired. I transported across country 2 jewelers benches and boxes and boxes of ”projects” intended to entertain me during my retirement. However, there was no active clock collecting community here, and collecting in isolation just wasn’t that interesting. Internet connections and groups were not as available then, nor did they seem an adequate replacement. I stopped collecting and turned to other hobbies that had interested me in the past, but never had the time of funds to explore.

So as we speak of the future of clock collecting, I guess for some the internet may be the new chapter meeting. But whatever form, the social aspect, I believe, is important.

The current values are, of course, disappointing. But as I am now 76 and looking at the future of my collection, I search for good homes for my clock treasures. I will loose money on most of them, but there is some satisfaction in knowing that they will be appreciated. Sentimental slop I suppose.

I am constantly alert for someone younger, just starting out, to pass on some of my accumulated items they might be of use to them. They seem to be very hard to find.
 
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fido

Registered User
Jan 17, 2016
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At risk of being abrasive but intentionally contrary I take exception to this view. The person who made a 17th-18th century clock in a magnificent case could not save his/her soul from Hades if required to make a quartz clock movement to do so. On the other hand a person who could design a quartz clock movement now could likely make a 17th-18th century type clock. I can't help but be appreciative of quartz clocks that are cheap, accurate, compact, need a cheap AA battery once per year with no need for maintenance and winding. The accumulated knowledge invested in a quartz movement is impressive! If the quartz movement and AA battery were invented first there would be no mechanical movement clocks. Your view may differ.
Hello Cheezhead
no doubt the invention of the quartz movement has been interesting from a economical(cheapness point of view)

If we took this point of view with all artistic and skillfully manufactured things We would have plastic instead of marble Michelangelo sculptures,I am sure there are not many world records paid for quartz clocks or watches .As for your comment that the person who made the quartz clock could make the 17-18th century clock ,I doubt it very much they could (interested in others thoughts on this point)
I do not know if you know about the Henry Graves ,super complication from 1933 watch ,that took Patek Phillipe 8years to make ?

I would be happy for you to have your quartz watch ,I would be happy to have the Henry Graves watch.

There was knowledge in the invention of the Quartz movement not much skill and artistic craftsmanship and passion ,to create an object of beauty that would be valued for hundreds of years.

in my opinion we are lucky that the quartz movement has not been around very long.

I doubt I would travel around the world to look at quartz clocks in museums,in their plastic cases.


Fido.
 

Schatznut

NAWCC Member
Sep 26, 2020
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"There was knowledge in the invention of the Quartz movement not much skill and artistic craftsmanship and passion ,to create an object of beauty that would be valued for hundreds of years."

I beg to differ. Go look at a high-end Seiko quartz skeleton clock. Beautiful craftsmanship, beautiful movement, careful choice of modern materials, and exquisite Japanese artistry and attention to detail.
 

fido

Registered User
Jan 17, 2016
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"There was knowledge in the invention of the Quartz movement not much skill and artistic craftsmanship and passion ,to create an object of beauty that would be valued for hundreds of years."

I beg to differ. Go look at a high-end Seiko quartz skeleton clock. Beautiful craftsmanship, beautiful movement, careful choice of modern materials, and exquisite Japanese artistry and attention to detail.
Hi Schatzut
That's great you have pointed to one beautiful Quartz Skeleton clock ,I assume a copy of a mechanical one.

This discussion quartz versus mechanical is a bit pointless ,if you feel you would rather have a quartz clock or watch instead of a quality made mechanical watch or clock that's great ,I would if I could afford it have the mechanical one every time.
at least I would not have to keep buying batteries for the rest of my life. (although most people throw them away after a while any way)

Fido.
 

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