• Upcoming updates
    Over the next couple of weeks we will be performing software updates on the forum. These will be completed in small steps as we upgrade individual software addons. You might occasionally see a maintenance message that will last a few minutes at most.

    If we anticipate an update will take more than a few minutes, we'll put up a notice with estimated time.

    Thank you!

The EUBACHE mystery..!!!

RJSoftware

Registered User
Apr 15, 2005
8,851
279
83
Loxahatchee, Florida
Country
Region
Hello all.

What exactly is eubache...?

Ive tried to look it up online, even did the google definition eubache thing. No real answer but lots of opinions.

I take it that's not exactly a term of endearment.

Is it just a refference to some substandard copying technique..?

Or is there more to it as I suspect..?

You see, the first time I became aware of this terminology is when I did some research on French clocks (repairing Armel -see French connection).

The definition that I found then seemed to be a kind of established trade practice for parts that where often common, so maybe some standardization took place.

But now I see the term eubache is also used in the watch world.

So is it possible that clock and watchmaker industry tried to standardize (streamline) parts making, in particular gears..?

If it is true, then WHO where the ones who cranked out these parts. Who used them..?

Now think, if this is soo far true, then there might be a boonedoggle of parts interchangable.

That would be something we all could use.

RJ
 

doc_fields

Registered User
Sep 29, 2004
1,333
42
48
Greentop, MO
precisionclockandwatch.blogspot.com
Country
Region
I believe you've mis-spelled the word, RJ. It should be "ebauche". It is an horological term for a collection of parts that make up a watch. Here's what wikipedia has to say:

"Until about 1850, the watchmaker's ébauche consisted of two plates with pillars and bars, the barrel, fusée, index, pawl and ratchet-wheel, along with a few assembling screws. These parts were all roughly filed and milled. The steel and brass were manufactured in a special workshop. The ébauche was finished by watchmakers in a finishing shop. The assortiment (literally "assortment" in English) are the parts of a watch other than the ébauche, in particular the regulating organs and include the balance, hairspring or spiral, escape wheel, anchor lever and pallet stones or jewels. The modern ébauche is a jeweled watch movement, without its regulating organs, mainspring, dial, or hands."......................doc
 

svenedin

NAWCC Member
Jan 28, 2010
1,942
700
113
Surrey
Country
Region
It's generally an incomplete or unfinished clock or watch movement purchased by clock or watchmakers then finished or adapted for use in their clocks or watches. Many French clocks used movements of this type and they were also common in English and Swiss watchmaking. Even today some expensive watch brands buy ebauche movements from say ETA and then sell the completed watch with the bought-in movement. Some manufacturers do heavily modify these stocks movement.

It's a common misconception that a clockmaker (or watchmaker) actually made the movements. For the most part this did not happen. In fact, many were bought in as blanks (blancs) or partly assembled movements (blancs roulants). Of course the factory made clocks were generally made from start to finish in the factory but still other parts may have been bought in from specialist suppliers.

It has nothing to do with a copying technique to my knowledge.
 

RJSoftware

Registered User
Apr 15, 2005
8,851
279
83
Loxahatchee, Florida
Country
Region
Ah thanks doc for correcting my spelling on that.

Ok, so I get the picture now, thanks to both replies.

Now I have to wonder how much commonality between the finished products there where amoung watch/clock makers finished products.

Seems like allot of potential still exist for part swapping / interchangability.
 

doc_fields

Registered User
Sep 29, 2004
1,333
42
48
Greentop, MO
precisionclockandwatch.blogspot.com
Country
Region
Standardization of parts did not come about until early this past century. Before that, parts were made by individuals (cottage industry), and shipped or taken to the watchmaker, who then had to get the parts to all fit together, hence, the images of watchmakers hunched over their benches with loupes on their eyes, filing away, adjusting, setting jewels, etc. Then, the watchmaker did not make the entire watch as is done today, but rather took all the parts (ebauches) and meticulously fitted them together. A bridge for the balance may not fit an identical watch beside it, and if by chance it did, then other parts would not. There was, in reality, no real interchangability between in-house watches in essence. A watchmaker could DO that, but much work had to be done to achieve it. Hope this helps!.......................doc
 

Forum statistics

Threads
179,022
Messages
1,570,255
Members
54,047
Latest member
aztrukin
Encyclopedia Pages
909
Total wiki contributions
3,088
Last edit
Swiss Fake by Kent