The dreamer in me lives on!

Discussion in 'Member News and Views' started by dweiss17, Oct 26, 2010.

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  1. dweiss17

    dweiss17 Registered User
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    #801 dweiss17, Mar 8, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 31, 2017
    Re: A little of this, some of that!

    The dreamer in me lives on...

    Yesterday the temperature was about 29° as I sat on the Captain's Chair looking out of the picture
    window in the living room. I saw many birds flying to and fro…a sure harbinger of a renewed
    life…Spring time. The birds were busy getting their nests ready for the laying of eggs and the
    hatching of their offspring.

    Today the weather warms up to 51° making the life of the human a little more tolerable. Wednesday
    when I go for my half-yearly doctor checkup it may reach 59°. Even so, we still have streets that
    are filled with the aftermath…piles of snow.

    This past winter was one not fit for human or beast. The cold and the overabundance of snow
    accumulation broke many records in many states across the country, as did the cold weather breaking
    records that stood for many years.

    We are now into daylight saving time, although ancient civilizations used its merits, Benjamin Franklin
    has received credit for its implementation in the USA. No matter who invented it…the world is better
    off with an hour more of daylight…the benefits derived from getting up an hour earlier far overshadows
    the need for an extra hour of sleep.

    I cannot wait for the time I will be able to sit on my back patio and take in the greenery of our lawns,
    bushes and trees. The squirrels that inhabit this area are the best high wire walkers I ever saw; from the
    trees to the pole wires that carry electric energy…these lithe, little animals actually run across them without
    ever a slip or fall.
     
  2. dweiss17

    dweiss17 Registered User
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    #802 dweiss17, Mar 9, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 31, 2017
    Re: A little of this, some of that!

    Yesterday I made a post about the arrival of warmer weather, the accumulation of snow still on our streets, and birds flying around getting ready refurbishing their nests in preparation to laying their eggs that will hatch into offspring as the harbinger of the long awaited Spring warmer weather.

    I see that 40 people as of this morning have looked at that posting without a reply. Maybe I expect too much from our 14,000-15,000 NAWCC membership in looking for a reply to my posting. Sometimes it makes me think I am talking to myself and that I am in the dotage of my many years on this earth.

    I do not like talking to myself…I do not like making a fool of myself. Maybe I expect too much from my fellow NAWCCer. Maybe I have an overblown vision of myself. Of my need to sit down before my computer and post stuff that has no interest for the members of this horologic society. I cannot help but think many of our members have no need and no interest to post a reply to the dribble I post here.

    That I may consider myself like the miner who pans for gold and comes up empty pan after pan of dirt bearing gold flakes. Yet, he keeps on panning in the hope of finding that gold. This horologic site is full of other miners, who perhaps are interested in other Forums in which they find their gold bearing ore.

    For instance…like the time I found a pocket watch pilfered by a worker in the Howard Watch factory and finished it to suit himself without any engraving upon its plates. He punched out the five serial numbers on the three quarter plate and used a balance cock with serial numbers 333.

    Maybe I should stop writing about stuff that has no interest to the average NAWCC member? But then what would I do…sit all day looking at the TV screen? Or, re-read a book I read long ago. That could be quite boring to anyone who wants to use his aged brain in the effort to keep it active and alive. We who have lived as long as I have - can write many true stories that took place during these long years of life. I wonder should I?

    BTW: Pictured is the rare and only Howard that ever left the factory without engraving upon its plates. Pilfered or otherwise. On several chapters no longer in the NAWCC lineup…the full story has had possibly 5000-6000 hits and an abundance of replies. 224514.jpg
     
  3. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Re: A little of this, some of that!

    40 people read the new posts, Dan. Some probably agree with your sentiments, and had nothing of value to add. Some posts are like a rhetorical question. No answer is needed (or expected), but it still gets you thinking :)
    When I read your post, my mind went to global warming :D
     
  4. dweiss17

    dweiss17 Registered User
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    Re: A little of this, some of that!

    Shutterbug:

    Thanks for your post...global warming is far from my mind. At the twilight of a long life...I find myself thinking about many of the things that happened during this long lifetime. My mind goes back to 239 Fairmount Avenue, I was probably 4-5 years old...we had a coal stove in the kitchen and we also had a gas meter in which you deposited quarters allowing you to use your gas stove for cooking. The coal stove, a four burner with lids that you lifted with a gadget that fit into the stove lids...I remember my mother heating a large metal pot and hand washing clothes on a ribbed metal rubbing board. I think the washed clothing were hung on rope lines in the yard with wooden clothes pins. Fels Naptha was the brick yellow soap of choice.
     
  5. shutterbug

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    Re: A little of this, some of that!

    I grew up in a large family in the country, and we were poor as well. I remember many of the same things you list :) It occurs to me that your writings here would make a great book of your life that your descendants would enjoy reading!
     
  6. Bill Stuntz

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    Re: A little of this, some of that!

    Fels Naphtha was also the soap of choice for foul-mouthed youngsters. That stuff tasted AWFUL! :cop:
     
  7. MartinM

    MartinM Registered User

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    Re: A little of this, some of that!

    Given how much change we've seen, just in the last few decades, in how the world, and especially the family is 'run'...
    I'd love to hear what it was like for a kid growing up in the '20s or '30s.
    In the '60s and '70s, when I was a young'n, when summer came, we'd jump on our bikes or just hop the fence to a half-million acres of homestead land being ranched by a neighbor and the only expectation on us was that we came home for supper. My dad was a gun nut and I cringe, now, thinking of all the things that could have gone south while playing with bulk powder and trying to do our own version of a Mount Rushmore. Bottle rocket wars. Playing with quicksilver. Melting coke bottles with rocket fuel some of the dads snuck out of Aerojet. Jumping out of a 60 foot high tree house on a clothesline pulley on 1/4" sisal line and trying to make it to the ground in one piece. Fording rivers we had no business even trying to swim in. Outrunning cops on dirt bikes (The cops actually loved that). Riding down a steep hill and crossing a state highway in a shopping cart using a 2x4 for steering (No brakes). Exploring old mines with a garden hose for a rope and where the timbers (when there were any) crumbled at a touch.
    We may have been a smidgen more adventurous than most of the other neighborhoods; But, they all had similar stories to tell at school.
    And now we've come to a world where our kids aren't allowed to be out of our sight for more than a few minutes and they don't even have the ambition to try the stuff we enjoyed when I was little. Part of it is us, as parents being protective; But part of it is them not really wanting to explore About the best they seem capable of is going to a LAN party and wasting the day playing video games.

    Given such a radical change in my 50+ years in the world, I was wondering if other folks had similar experiences and thoughts on the matter and ultimately, what additional freedoms were to be had 30-40-50 years prior.
     
  8. dweiss17

    dweiss17 Registered User
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    #808 dweiss17, Mar 9, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 31, 2017
    Let me tell you a story about Christmas gifts:

    I was not quite four years old at this time, my older brother Morris had heard the Roumanian (yes the proper spelling in those years) Orthodox Church was giving out red mesh stockings filled with candy or other gifts a day before Christmas; that would have been about 1919. The church was at 4[SUP]th[/SUP] & Brown Streets, not too far from our home at 814 Bodine Street, a very narrow street between 2[SUP]nd[/SUP] & 3[SUP]rd[/SUP] Street. It ran for only one block and I am sure we must have had an outhouse in the back. I still remember the sconces that were gas jets to light the rooms. Today that area is very upscale.

    Morris took my little hand and we walked over to the church and got in line with other kids who were there to get a stocking filled with gifts. Finally, we received our gifts…but never told them we were Jewish. In a family of seven kids at that time, one never received a gift - unless it was a bit of clothing that was a hand-me-down from an older brother. My father was a luggage worker and never was a high-salaried individual. I would imagine that stocking filled with candy or other things like toys was the first gift I ever received. I have no memory of what was inside the mesh red stocking.

    In 1923 we moved to 628 W. Columbia Avenue…it was there that the life I was to live really took hold. I will not talk about that now, but I remember my father telling my mother in 1926, that Queen Marie of Roumania was coming to Philadelphia to visit the Roumanian Orthodox Church at 4[SUP]th[/SUP] & Brown Streets. I forgot to say, "That my parents emigrated from Roumania."
     
  9. Bill Stuntz

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    Re: A little of this, some of that!

    It's a very different world from the time/place I grew up - born 1948, grew up in a small city (Conneaut, OH) right on Lake Erie. I had the freedoms you described, too. And I don't think I came to any harm from it. Let me know where you're going, be home for dinner, don't get into trouble pretty well describes it. When I fell from about 10 feet up a tree, my dad's response was "I hope you learned your lesson - willow tree branches are brittle and probably won't hold you." The few times I did get in trouble, I was in just as much trouble at home, if not more. If I got paddled in school, I could expect another one at home. None of this "Lets see if we can get rich by taking the school to court" crap. Kids didn't expect the world to give them everything they wanted. If I wanted money, I had to EARN it. Starting about age 5, gathering pop bottles on the beach for the 2 cent deposit bought me a lot of nickel candy bars or Cokes, mow lawns, rake leaves, or shovel snow. Starting at age 10, I delivered newspapers for about $7/week. Stock boy in a drug store during last 2 years of HS. Then again, tobacco was the BIG drug problem in high school. And if sexual abuse was a problem, nobody ever heard about it. There are a whole different set of problems now.
     
  10. harold bain

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    Re: A little of this, some of that!

    Hey Bill, 1948 was a good year. It certainly was a different world back then. I recall about 1953, my parents bought a TV. It was the first one in the neighbourhood, and I think we got two, maybe three channels. All the neighbour kids would come over after school to watch it. I recall around when I was 12, I got a 3 speed bicycle for my birthday, and after that, the city was open for exploration. The summers seemed endless, always something to do, pick up games of baseball, or ball hockey, then after supper, be home when the streetlights come on. Sure, I got into lots of trouble, but getting the belt from my father, or from the school principal, didn't harm me, but I don't know that it changed my behaviour either. I just grew out of the bad stuff and went on with life, got a job working for Simplex at 18, married at 19, kids at 21, and looking back, not much I would want to change.
     
  11. Bill Stuntz

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    Re: A little of this, some of that!

    Speaking of TV - I think the electronic babysitter is a significant part of the problem.
    1) Every problem in the world can be solved in 30, 60, or 120 minutes. NO solvable problem requires 90 minutes - or more than 120.
    2) The first choice for a possible solution to any problem is violence.
    3) There's something in a colorful package that will solve any problem that violence can't fix. Throw money at it.
     
  12. richiec

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    Re: A little of this, some of that!

    I agree with Harold, I was born in 1953, I had chores from the time I was 7 but no cell phones just that at dinner time you were expected to be home. In most cases we were playing kick the can in the back yard or next door rolling down the hill in cardboard boxes. The private golf club across the street from my house opened up their gates for sleigh riding every year, something in this sue conscious world they would not think to do, it was a world where people got drunk, broke their legs and had a good time without suing someone while sleigh riding. We hopped on our bikes, rode to the local park, the school grounds etc without worry about being kidnapped, molested, etc. We did have a Chester the molester in the street behind our house but our father told us to stay away from him, he did threaten to kill him at least once but never did. Gosh times were different, I was a caddy for 5 years, pumped gas from 16 until I was 46 and was a mechanic, worked for a tree service for a year which I hated. I love caddying, got to play golf on Mondays if no one member wanted to play. Still play golf to this day. Why is life so complicated today?
     
  13. scottmiami

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    #813 scottmiami, Mar 9, 2015
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    Re: A little of this, some of that!


    Dan, please keep in mind that just because we don't necessarily have the time to reply, we do enjoy and appreciate you sharing your experiences nonetheless. Don't for a minute think they are not read & enjoyed. By all means, please continue!

    Cheers!
    Scott
     
  14. shutterbug

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    Re: A little of this, some of that!

    Recently I read an article in the local paper about two kids who were allowed to walk home from school together - about a mile distance. A busybody called the police to report this "unsafe" situation, and DHS was called in to chastise the parents and to assure that such poor parenting practices would stop immediately.
    That's the over-protected nanny state we've come to! In my day, MOST kids that close to school walked.
     
  15. David S

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    Re: A little of this, some of that!

    Yes we always played out side in the woods behind our apartments playing cowboys. And it was a big deal when one of the kids got a Daisy Red Ryder BB gun. How none of us got injured I have no idea.

    David
     
  16. MartinM

    MartinM Registered User

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    Re: A little of this, some of that!

    I had forgotten all about BB gun wars. I had the Red Ryder so could get off a lot of shots; But, my friends all had 760s; So, I could rarely get close enough to take advantage of my rate of fire.
    Okay... Here's a really dumb one.
    I put a 12 gauge shell in a piece of pipe and taped it to the end of my barrel.
    When I shot it (Using a wool coat for protection, like that was gonna do any good) the round went off as expected and it wasn't a half bad system... Except for the whole pipe flying off the end of my gun and punching a pair of holes in my dad's tin shed. I still don't understand the physics on that one.
    And now I'm reminded of the flaming gasoline tennis ball cannons and firecracker cannons using two tin cans and some water. One of our initiations dictated that you had to hold that in your hands when it went off and launched the inner can over the oak tree. If it didn't clear the tree, you had to keep trying. It's amazing that the few times I had to go to the ER for something, it was due to an activity that was supervised by adults or a truly unforeseeable accident.
     
  17. dweiss17

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    #817 dweiss17, Mar 10, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 31, 2017
    Re: A little of this, some of that!

    How President Reagan put into law in 1988, a project that came from my thoughts as a person who stutters.

    My formal education stopped at 13-14 years of age.

    Possibly 85-86 years ago, the hurt and humiliation still is with me, never to be forgotten. I was in the 8[SUP]th[/SUP] grade in public school when the teacher [a Mr. Morris] called upon me to answer a question in the science class. I knew the answer and got up to speak, with my stuttering voice, I froze, I stood for what seemed an eternity to me and could not voice the answer…I was told to sit down and the entire class and the teacher started giggling and laughing and as a skinny little kid, I was never so embarrassed in all my years of life; that even today it recalls the cruelty of my classmates and teacher and the horrific laughter at my expense that as a person who stutters went through.

    Over the years, while I stuttered less as I aged, I was still an adult with a stuttering problem that would be with me all my days of life. Fast forward to 1986, I do not remember if it was on TV or radio…I heard a lawyer and a doctor talking about wanting to form a Chapter of the National Stuttering Project in the Philadelphia area. I called and was informed that February 24[SUP]th[/SUP] of that year A chapter would try to be formed at the Library at 54[SUP]th[/SUP] Street just above City Line Avenue. In a blinding snow storm 33 people from all walks of life met…and the Philadelphia Chapter of the National Stuttering Project was formed. As each of us spoke, some more fluently than others, I spoke about my history growing up as an errand boy for a print shop and a career in the Graphic Arts industry.

    The leaders wanted to create a monthly newsletter…who better than someone in the Graphic Arts to create such a newsletter. Doctor Libby asked me if I would venture into that realm of creating an ongoing newsletter. That was done, I named it "Speaking Out" and each month it was sent to our members and some 40 other chapters around the country. In September of that year I read something, I do not remember where, but a lot of handicaps were listed that had days, weeks or a month named for that certain failing. It dawned upon me the problem of oral speech was not listed in that group of handicaps.

    As editor of 'Speaking Out'…in October, my Editorial related that worldwide one in every 100 people [factual] had an oral speaking problem. We the people…who stuttered or had difficulty speaking should have a week named in our honor, Stuttering Awareness Week…to bring to the public's attention that we too are handicapped. To make a long story shorter…I attach three bits of information relating to Stuttering Awareness Week.

    Should you care to read the full story…use your computer and on the Internet type in…National Stuttering Awareness Week by Judith Kuster. You may find other listings…only Ms Kuster's version is the correct one. 231048.jpg 231041.jpg 231049.jpg
     
  18. dweiss17

    dweiss17 Registered User
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    #818 dweiss17, Mar 12, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 31, 2017
    Re: A little of this, some of that!

    While it seems we have had 283 hits and about 13 replies since I first posted my Christmas story on 3/9/15, I certainly wish those that read the Members News and Views might take a little time and post something that will start a dialogue with our members who constantly read this Forum.

    Be it about your first car, happenings in your life, schooling. cat and dog pets; I know we cannot post political literature, but living our everyday lives and what happened that day, or a week, or a year ago on your birthday...surely will bring a response from someone. Even if you have no one to write a letter to...write yourself a letter...post it or not...it may help you get rid of pent up feelings and brighten your day.

    I went for my half-yearly checkup with my primary doctor, yesterday...the results were wonderful. I then went for a haircut and my first real-ever pedicure sitting in a chair that massaged your back as the nails on your feet were manicured to a tolerable state. Also yesterday, was exactly nine (9) months from my 100th birthday. I could also write a story how the four ladies who are my (waitresses) for the past seventeen (17) years with whom I have a rapport or [love affair] have kept me young and healthy. These ladies who go about serving patrons their meals, breakfast, brunch or dinner, will be invited and take part in wishing me well…on my 100[SUP]th[/SUP] Birthday.

    I do not want to write about my bum knees that are supported with knee guards and a walker that enables me to get around.

    So let's put down something on this Forum for all to read…things that responds to the human spirit.
     

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