"The Book"-A peep through the window of Time

Discussion in 'European & Other Pocket Watches' started by Allan C. Purcell, May 27, 2019.

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  1. Allan C. Purcell

    Allan C. Purcell Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Feb 9, 2013
    1,883
    418
    83
    Male
    retired
    Germany
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Has you all know I have been working on an account book written between 1815 to 1830 by Osborne & White
    New York. I hope members will enjoy this, and please, if you can find faults please let me know, and corrections will also be welcome.

    In the next copy, the pages will be numbered?

    [​IMG]
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Tom McIntyre

    Tom McIntyre Technical Admin
    Staff Member NAWCC Star Fellow NAWCC Ruby Member Sponsor

    Aug 24, 2000
    81,700
    1,278
    176
    Male
    retired SW dev
    Boston
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Wonderful bit of work Allan. It is fascinating the number of entries for Embree and Van Wycke.

    The second Barraud entry with the chronometer comes up in a shade of green I have difficulty reading.

    I believe th name that appears as Demill should be Demilt but I have not tried to read the obscure handwriting you have had to deal with.

    I do find that using the ctrl/f search tool on the PDF file is very useful.

    Thanks for this. :)
     
    Keith R... likes this.
  3. John Matthews

    John Matthews Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Sep 22, 2015
    1,925
    695
    113
    Retired Systems Architect
    France
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Allan - excellent resource, well done.

    John
     
  4. Allan C. Purcell

    Allan C. Purcell Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Feb 9, 2013
    1,883
    418
    83
    Male
    retired
    Germany
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Thank you, John, I thought you would like that, it's one for the record. Tom, high praise indeed, thank you, this is just the type of information I am looking for. The Demilt or Demill is a problem. I looked him up on "Silversmiths & Related Craftsmen in Longworth´s 1827 & 1839. There is a Demill (Samuel) watchmaker at 239 Pearl and went along with the name. Since your letter, I have had a look at the original´s again and find it is Thomas Demilt on page 224,127,51, & 29. Can you comment? Could the Samuel be a son? Barraud is now in Blue, I put it in Green so I could find it quickly.
    There were also seven alerts, I thank you all, but if you find things like Tom please write.
    Regards,
    Allan
     
    John Matthews likes this.
  5. Jerry Freedman

    Jerry Freedman Registered User
    NAWCC Star Fellow NAWCC Member

    Sep 16, 2000
    671
    17
    18
    Allan: Looking at the watch numbers and the repair dates, I wonder about the Roskell numbering system . Could his shop have made the quanity
    of watches the numbers suggest?

    Jerry Freedman
     
  6. Allan C. Purcell

    Allan C. Purcell Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Feb 9, 2013
    1,883
    418
    83
    Male
    retired
    Germany
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Jerry, thank you for the question, in this case, we have to get away from that word shop. Robert Roskell was a member of the Landed Gentry. So his family was not short of money. He was probably put into an apprenticeship by his family too. His apprenticeship was to John Tarlton, a Liverpool watchmaker, and later Robert married his daughter. When Tarlton died, Robert was in Partnership with another apprentice, but not for long. It´s here that the picture moves into speculation, where did all the watches carrying his name come from. The numbers tell us he had sold more than 30,000 by 1824. A rogue estimate of 1,200 watches a year. That alone tells us he never made a watch, he must have had a cottage industry behind him, and help in the trade, both here and abroad. Glasgow says he sold 30,000 to South America alone. By the time of his retirement in 1843, his numbers were well over 50,000, though his son carried on with the numbering till about 1875. If you want more information on Robert Roskell please see John Matthews posts on this board, there is everything you need to know about Robert Roskell.
    Regards,
    Allan.
     
    Keith R... likes this.
  7. John Matthews

    John Matthews Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Sep 22, 2015
    1,925
    695
    113
    Retired Systems Architect
    France
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    #7 John Matthews, May 29, 2019
    Last edited: May 29, 2019
    Allan - you clearly put in some tremendous work to transcribe the information into the file you have shared - it is really appreciated.

    I have spent, as have others no doubt, a number of hours pouring over the information contained. It is most interesting.

    Here is a spreadsheet I have been working on regarding the Roskell data which I hope you and others, may find useful. I have sorted the data on the basis of the serial numbers and converted the dates into the 'English' format. (Our American friends only have to select the column to change the format,)

    I don't use the MS suite, so it is in OpenOffice format, which I have had to put in zip format because the OpenOffice files are not supported on this platform. I think the MS suite will read the OO files, but OO is a free download if anyone cannot read the file. (The components of the OO suite mirrors the MS suite and is free)

    John

    Note for Tom - can we add the OO files to the supported list '.ods' & '.odt' ?

    EDIT
    - Allan I am looking at page 11 of the pdf. On this page it appears that the date format used in column 1 has changed to DD.MM.YYYY whereas on the previous and next page it is MM.DD.YYYY - which is what I had assumed with the Roskell data. Am I safe to assume that the entries are generally in chronological order? It is possible that the way you have recorded the information is as it was in the original - some clarification would be helpful. Thanks,
     

    Attached Files:

  8. Tom McIntyre

    Tom McIntyre Technical Admin
    Staff Member NAWCC Star Fellow NAWCC Ruby Member Sponsor

    Aug 24, 2000
    81,700
    1,278
    176
    Male
    retired SW dev
    Boston
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    #8 Tom McIntyre, May 29, 2019
    Last edited: May 29, 2019
    I added the file types. I am not sure how various readers will use them in the browser.

    I downloaded the file and will upload it as an attachment to this message in its unzipped form.

    My Chrome browser downloads the file rather than opening it in my browser. I do not have any plugin for my browser that will open it directly. I suspect that if it were saved as a Google Sheet, it would open in the same browser when double clicked.

    I don't really use the Google Apps, but it appears that they only operate on files stored on Google Drive and not in the context of the application that is running in the browser (like XenForo).
     

    Attached Files:

  9. Allan C. Purcell

    Allan C. Purcell Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Feb 9, 2013
    1,883
    418
    83
    Male
    retired
    Germany
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    John, I see from your file what you are getting at, but to be honest, I think I understood about 5% of what you were trying to tell me. I am totally useless when it comes to what these machines can do, and when you use abbreviations. it´s like switching off the lights. When I received these files in January. I must admit my mind was one tracked into the Roskell numbers, and I tried my best to search them out. That turned out to be a piece of luck, but my search was faulted, and I missed some of them. It did teach me though to go through the files slowly. all 266 pages, though by now I had got used to some of the authors writing. So the Roskell numbers in these files could be re-written, I could, of course, put them in the Roskell file under Osborne, but I am still thinking about that. Has the "THE BOOK" looks at the moment the page numbers are those I gave the file (They are in fact no numbers on the File after page 9.) The work, in fact, I did for Rich Newman and Philip Poniz, was to help out the Winterthur Museum, what they do with it I think will far more interesting in the end, but will take a while. I like what you have done with the Roskell file, and attached is a copy of "The Book" with page numbers from 1 to 59, so when people ask a question we can find the pieces easily. Thanks again John,
    Regards,
    Allan.

    [​IMG]
     

    Attached Files:

  10. John Matthews

    John Matthews Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Sep 22, 2015
    1,925
    695
    113
    Retired Systems Architect
    France
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Tom - thank-you for adding the OpenOffice file types.

    The file you have uploaded has unzipped correctly into its original form - a OpenOffice spreadsheet. I am not aware of a plugin to open these files within a browser, although one may exist. OpenOffice will open Excel files, I think that Excel may open or import '.ods' files, but I'm not absolutely certain - it would be useful if someone could confirm. I know there are other Open Office users on the forum.

    John
     
  11. Tom McIntyre

    Tom McIntyre Technical Admin
    Staff Member NAWCC Star Fellow NAWCC Ruby Member Sponsor

    Aug 24, 2000
    81,700
    1,278
    176
    Male
    retired SW dev
    Boston
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    #11 Tom McIntyre, May 29, 2019
    Last edited: May 29, 2019
    Excel and Office 360 have no problem with the files and Google Sheets can open them if they are copied to one's Google Files folder. It would be nice if it could just open in line like an image but that does not appear to exist.

    I like that capability in PDF files and attachments.

    The zip file is slightly smaller and takes one more click to open once downloaded. :)

    here is a shot with Google docs management.
    Osborne & White Day Book transcripts Allan Purcell - Roskell (1)

    I think that is a bit cooler. It is being shared from my Google Files storage.
     
  12. Allan C. Purcell

    Allan C. Purcell Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Feb 9, 2013
    1,883
    418
    83
    Male
    retired
    Germany
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Tom, I tried to print out your table of the Roskell numbers, but it only lets me print page one-why is that?? Allan.
     
  13. davy26

    davy26 Registered User

    May 25, 2015
    142
    19
    18
    Male
    Researcher and Writer
    Kent, England
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Allan - all your work and the outcome are both very much appreciated. It takes a lot of persistence and determination to complete a transcription job like this, and I'm sure all Pocket Watch enthusiasts will be grateful to you for adding a newly accessible significant set of data for further research purposes. With kind regards. David.
     
    musicguy and Keith R... like this.
  14. Rich Newman

    Rich Newman Chair
    Director NAWCC Fellow NAWCC Member

    Apr 6, 2005
    495
    101
    43
    Male
    Retired
    Illinois
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Great job Allan & thank you for taking on this project.
     
    Keith R... likes this.
  15. Tom McIntyre

    Tom McIntyre Technical Admin
    Staff Member NAWCC Star Fellow NAWCC Ruby Member Sponsor

    Aug 24, 2000
    81,700
    1,278
    176
    Male
    retired SW dev
    Boston
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Sorry Allan, I do not know. It is my first try at using the Google facility. I may have cut off the Excel file at some content limit.
     
  16. Allan C. Purcell

    Allan C. Purcell Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Feb 9, 2013
    1,883
    418
    83
    Male
    retired
    Germany
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Thank you all for the encouragement, I enjoyed every minute:rolleyes:. I am now trying to understand the way they worked through their accounts, and it is an uphill climb, though I am getting there and some of the purchases and are quite remarkable. The main point of interest is the trust they had in each other, which I don´t think we have today. The shortage of cash was one of the reasons, and of course, the large distances from the source to service. Tom, I would like a copy if you can get it sorted, then let me know how it ;)works, please,
     
    Keith R... likes this.
  17. Tom McIntyre

    Tom McIntyre Technical Admin
    Staff Member NAWCC Star Fellow NAWCC Ruby Member Sponsor

    Aug 24, 2000
    81,700
    1,278
    176
    Male
    retired SW dev
    Boston
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Allan, the document I embedded is stored on Google Drive as a Google Sheet. The idea is very similar to the Open Docs suite that others have mentioned. This is the home page for all the Google Apps chrome://apps/
     
    Keith R... likes this.
  18. Allan C. Purcell

    Allan C. Purcell Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Feb 9, 2013
    1,883
    418
    83
    Male
    retired
    Germany
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    "The requested page could not be found" All´s well Tom, I took a photograph.(5)
     
    Keith R... likes this.
  19. Keith R...

    Keith R... Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Nov 27, 2012
    5,373
    1,705
    113
    Male
    Retired Sr. Proj. mgr,
    South
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Allan, keep up the great work!!

    To all my friends, I just blame all my faults on the cataracts.;)

    I caught the edit thingy...........

    Keith R...
     
  20. Allan C. Purcell

    Allan C. Purcell Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Feb 9, 2013
    1,883
    418
    83
    Male
    retired
    Germany
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    #20 Allan C. Purcell, Jun 9, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2019
    I was told about this from a friend in England, and not having seen it before I thought I would put on here for members, this is the page with the clocks on, as yet I have not found the watches, will put them on when found. If you want it in the clock department thats OK too. Allan
    PS. Try the 18th. century at the bottom from clocks homepage for watches There are though lots more..



    stedlog.gif
    gpcataloguesm.jpg
    Collection Catalogue



    Introducing the Gershom Parkington Collection


    and types of Clocks and Watches
    The measuring of time has been an issue since pre-historic days. In these pages we will not deal with sundials, water clocks, time sticks, or other ingenious devices. However, it is worth noting that an early reference to a water clock, located in the Abbey of St Edmund at Bury, was made by Jocelin of Brakelond in his chronicle. He recorded that in 1198, a fire in the shrine was fought by monks fetching water from the rain water tank and the clock.

    The first mechanical clocks in this country were used in monasteries, and came after about 1275.

    The main source of information on local timepieces is to be found in 'Suffolk Clocks & Clockmakers' by Arthur Haggar and Leonard Miller, published in 1974. A Supplement to this work was published in 1979, containing additions and corrections to the 1974 listings.

    These pages will deal with clocks made in and around Bury St Edmunds. The famous Gershom Parkington collection, described below, was not intended to be a local collection, but a representation of all the best types of time measuring instruments. Here, we will pick out only local examples for consideration.


    gpfagcardsm.jpg
    Gershom Parkington card 1934
    The John Gershom Parkington Memorial Collection of Time Measurement Instruments
    In 1953, the Bury St Edmunds Borough Council was left a notable collection of clocks and watches in memory of John Gershom-Parkington, (1920-1941), who was killed during the Second World War. The collection was bequeathed by his father, Frederic Gershom Parkington, better known as just Gershom Parkington. Frederic had died on 23rd January 1952, in Jersey.

    The Jersey Heritage Trust has summarised the provisions of his will as follows: " Will and Testament of Frederic Gershom Parkington, known as Frederic Gershom-Parkington, of 5, Douro Terrace, St Helier. Desires to be cremated and have his ashes buried with his wife. Bequeaths to his late violinist, Tom Jones, his music and quintette arrangements; to the town of Bury St Edmonds, all time pieces and books relating to the measurement of time in memory of his son John Gershom Parkington who was killed in the last war. Dated 22/12/1951."

    The London Gazette of 13th March, 1953 publicised the existence of the will, and asked for claims against it to be made by 15th May, 1953. Once the council of Bury St Edmunds was made aware of the bequest, it had to consider if it would accept it, and how to make arrangements to house and display it.

    The Gershom Parkington Quintette used to be a household name, playing light music on the wireless in the years after 1925. Its founder and leader was one of the Parkingtons who ran a successful tailoring business at 29 Abbeygate Street, Bury St Edmunds, which had served generations of Bury's inhabitants.

    Frederic was born in 1886, seven years after the rest of his brothers and sisters. His parents gave him the name Gershom from the Bible, where it is said to mean 'a little surprise', although he used to say afterwards that it really meant ‘the unwanted one'.

    He was a gifted cellist, and he trained at the Royal Academy of Music. Thus he avoided joining the family business to become a professional musician. He conducted the local orchestra at Bridlington Spa for a time and broadcast for the BBC for almost thirty years. Professionally, he always used the name Gershom Parkington. He was so popular that in 1934, W D and H O Wills included him as number 15 of their series of 50 Cigarette Cards called "Wills Radio Celebrities."

    abbeygate29sm.jpg
    T W Parkington and Son Tailors This picture of T W Parkington's tailor's shop at 29 Abbeygate Street, Bury St Edmunds, was taken from the firm's advertisement in the Town Guide Book for 1955-1956.
    Kelly's Directory for 1892 had described the business thus:- "Thomas Wilding Parkington - military tailor and outfitter, hunting breeches, liveries and riding trousers, 29 Abbeygate Street."

    In Kelly's Directory of Suffolk for 1900, the entry was :- "Parkington, TW and Son, Tailors and Outfitters, 29 Abbeygate Street."

    johngpsm.jpg
    John Gershom Parkington As a hobby, Gershom Parkington bought rare clocks, watches, sundials and sand-glasses, largely through a specialist dealer named Percy Webster, of Queen Street, Mayfair, and built up a notable collection with a national reputation. It was this collection which he left to the town of his birth on condition that it was named the John Gershom Parkington Memorial Collection.
    By agreement with the National Trust the collection was, at first, installed in the Queen Ann house next to the Borough Offices and now known as Angel Corner.

    clocks1958sm.jpg
    Beevers' catalogue of 1958 The Connoisseur Year Book for 1958 included a catalogue of the John Gershom Parkington Memorial Collection of Time measurement Instruments at Bury St Edmunds. It was compiled by S Benson Beevers and it was reprinted as a catalogue to be sold to visitors to the collection in its home at Angel Corner in Bury St Edmunds. The catalogue grouped the items under the major headings of "Mechanical", such as clocks and watches, and "Non-Mechanical", such as Quadrants, Sundials and Nocturnals. As far as we know, this was the first catalogue ever produced of Parkington's collection. A new catalogue was produced in 1979.
    In 1974 the collection passed to the successor authority, which was the St Edmundsbury Borough Council. The clocks continued to be on display at Angel Corner.

    According to the 1979 catalogue of the Collection, the Borough Council had already owned a collection of locally made clocks and watches, which was merged with the Gershom-Parkington Collection.

    The house known as Angel Corner seems to have been officially given this name in 1956. The clock collections were joined there by the Bury and West Suffolk Records Office. The records were there until 1973, the clocks until 1993. From 1993 to April 2006 the Clock Collections were on display at the Manor House Museum, until that museum closed.

    From 2007 there is a new gallery displaying the clock collection to be found in Moyse's Hall Museum.

    Many of the clocks illustrated in these pages are taken from the Gershom Parkington Collection. However, it should be emphasised that the collection itself was never meant to be a local collection, although the clocks shown here are purely those of local interest. Other clocks shown on these pages are from dealers' catalogues and books.


    Introduction to Types of Clocks

    lanternsm.jpg
    Lantern Clock THE LANTERN CLOCK
    In Tudor times the production of clocks in England was in the hands of foreign craftsmen. Not until about 1620 did the first distinctively English clock design appear, and it is called the Lantern Clock.

    The typical Lantern Clock is made of brass, and resembles the shape of the old lanterns, and it is usually reckoned that its name was derived from this similarity. Haggar and Miller are inclined to doubt this theory, preferring a derivation from the old term for brass, which was "latten" or "latten metal." They cite old wills which refer to latten clocks specifically.

    Although they resemble lanterns, they were weight driven, and needed to be wall mounted so that the weights could hang below them.

    Lantern clocks came in two basic sizes. The largest stood 14 inches high and carried a striking mechanism. At first they had a wheel balance, but after 1657 a short bob pendulum was used. They had an hour hand, but no separate minute hand.

    Many Lantern clocks were made in Suffolk in the second half of the 17th century, but they continued to be made in Suffolk into the middle of the 18th century as well. Older wheel balance lantern clocks and short bob clocks also got converted to long pendulum control in this period.

    Ornamental fretwork was a feature of these clocks, and in Suffolk many makers favoured a design of crossed dolphins. In Bury, such clocks were made by Mark Hawkins and Richard Rayment.


    pacelongsm.jpg
    Long Case clock LONG CASE CLOCKS
    Long Case clocks first appeared around 1660 in England, but no Suffolk maker is known to have been making these earliest types. The earliest Long Case clock made in Suffolk dates from about 1700.

    The Long Case clock is the type which became generally known in the late 19th century as a Grandfather clock, following the popular song of that name, written in 1864. This type of clock encloses the entire length of the hanging weights and long pendulum within a wooden case. The clocks 'works' is also enclosed within a hood with a glass front to reveal the clock dial. It usually stands on the floor and can be 6 or 7 or even 8 feet tall.

    Such clocks were made by the Ipswich based Thomas Moore after 1710, and Moore is now regarded as the best Suffolk clockmaker. In Bury the best makers were William Hawkins and Richard Rayment.

    However, nearly all the later clockmakers produced Long Case clocks. They could be made to suit all pockets, and the case was dressed up to meet the appropriate price point. Country makers tended to use oak cases, and to make their clocks less tall, so that they could fit under lower cottage ceilings. Large country houses needed something on a bigger scale, with more ornamental finish.

    The example shown here is a fairly basic clock, but being made by John Pace of Bury in the early 19th century, it was of such quality that it still keeps good time today.

    lastwnsm.jpg
    W N Last Bracket Clock BRACKET CLOCKS
    These clocks can also be called Table Clocks, and at the time were also called Spring Clocks. In 1764, Bilby Dorling advertised that he could be found "at the sign of the Spring Clock in Cook Row", in Bury St Edmunds.

    As the name suggests, they were powered by a spring put under tension, rather than by long hanging weights. This made them difficult and expensive to make compared to the older types of movement. Thus in Suffolk the makers produced fewer of this type than the simpler mechanisms.

    However, in Bury, the fine workshop of Richard Rayment certainly produced Spring clocks after 1740.

    This example is by William Last of Bury St Edmunds from the early part of the 19th century. The mainspring having broken, it has been repaired in the last few years.



    Act of Parliament Clock PARLIAMENT CLOCKS OR TAVERN CLOCKS OR WALL CLOCKS
    In 1797 an Act of Parliament imposed a tax on clocks and watches, under William Pitt. The tax was 10 shillings a year for every gold watch or enamelled watch. For every silver or metal watch the tax was 2/6 a year. Every clock placed in or on a dwelling attracted a tax of 5 shillings a year.

    In anticipation of this Act, it was once believed that there was a rush to install "Act of Parliament" clocks before the tax was imposed. After the tax, it was said that they were installed in public places to replace the private timepieces which were now too expensive to afford. However, there had been a need for reliable public clocks in Taverns, inns, and public buildings for at least 50 years prior to that date. In fact, the tax was repealed after two years, so a genuine Act of Parliament clock can exist only from 1797 to 1799.

    Clocks usually given this name are wall mounted, and have this distinctive 'drop trunk' below the dial.

    A very early example of such a clock was reported by Haggar and Miller to be hung in the vestry of St Mary's Church in Bury, made by George Graham of London. It is dated to about 1720. An example from Bury was made by Giffin Rayment, who died in 1769, nearly 30 years before the notorious Act of Parliament which was said to have named these clocks.

    By the 1790's some smaller wall clocks were produced, sometimes called Norwich Wall Clocks.


    turretmoysessm.jpg
    Turret Clock TURRET CLOCKS
    Turret clocks were built on a completely different scale to other clocks. They were made to drive the large hands and dials of church clocks and clocks installed outdoors on large public buildings. Usually there would be the need for a striking mechanism large enough to drive a hammer on to a large church bell.

    The oldest turret clock is said to be at Salisbury Cathedral, where there is a record dated 1386. At Walberswick there is a record of such a clock dated to 1426. These clocks were probably built by a good local blacksmith, under the direction of a monk, or specialist travelling artisan.

    The turret clock shown here is from Long Melford School. Made in the 19th century, it is on display in Moyse's Hall Museum.



    John Pace Skeleton Clock SKELETON CLOCKS
    A skeleton clock is built to show off the internal workings of the clock. The body is built of ornamented brass fretwork or shaped struts, and it often stands on a mahogany base, below a glass dome, or inside a glass case. Elaborate design features could be included to show off the skill of the maker.

    In Bury the main maker of this type of clock was John Pace in the early and middle 19th century. Pace produced some deliberately unusual design ideas into his best skeleton clocks to show off his inventive nature. The example shown here is taken from Haggar and Miller,s book entitled "Suffolk Clocks and Clockmakers", and shows one of John Pace's creations.

    However, a small number of skeleton clocks have been found which were made by Benjamin Parker, a gunsmith in Churchgate Street in Bury, also from the mid 19th century.



    Richard Rayment Watch
    1727/29 WATCHES
    Here we are talking about pocket watches, as no wrist watches existed before 1868.

    Strangely enough, watches did not evolve out of the building of clocks. Watches have been made just as long as clocks. The earliest Suffolk watch dates from 1630, and is by W Houlgatt at Ipswich, and is now in the Victoria and Albert Museum. Large numbers of watches were made and sold from this date right through to the 19th century. By about 1780, such was the demand for watches, that they were factory made, and local clockmakers probably only installed factory movements in factory made cases of varying qualities.

    In October, 1791 T & W Chaplin of Cook Row in Bury were advertising in the Ipswich Journal for a "good Watch Finisher."




    Books Consulted
    "Time Measurement Instruments- catalogue of the John Gershom Parkington Memorial Collection" 3rd edition of 1979
    'Suffolk Clocks & Clockmakers' by Arthur Haggar and Leonard Miller 1974
    'Supplement to Suffolk Clocks & Clockmakers' by Arthur Haggar and Leonard Miller 1979
    Advice and information from Peter Webb, of Ernest Webb, Jewellers of 4, Risbygate Street, BSE (established 1952)
    The superb horological website of Clock Dealer Brian Loomes at www.brianloomes.com
    Clock Dealer Richard Harris at www.rchclocks.fsnet.co.uk
    The website of Leigh Extence at www.extence.co.uk

    Information first prepared by David Addy, 27th April 2006



    Go to Clocks Homepage Updated 22nd October 2007
     
  21. Allan C. Purcell

    Allan C. Purcell Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Feb 9, 2013
    1,883
    418
    83
    Male
    retired
    Germany
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Some photographs my friend in England sent from the above museum. Allan

    A-26.jpg A-34.jpg A-33.jpg A.37.jpg A.35.jpg
     
    Keith R... likes this.
  22. Allan C. Purcell

    Allan C. Purcell Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Feb 9, 2013
    1,883
    418
    83
    Male
    retired
    Germany
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    While writing up the book above, searching for the names of the makers was one of the tasks that gave some trouble, and here is a classic example. The watch movement we are about to look at, I think I posted somewhere else on the board, and it had to do with Ho Ho birds. There are two on the cock of this movement. The name on the watch is J. A. Hollisone and the number is 9660. (see photographs)

    In "THE BOOK" page 19 I have A. Hollisone Liverpool 1800. I got that from Loomes, Hollisone Alexander, Liverpool. d. 1800. Watch number 5641. In the book, it was brought in 12.9.1817

    On page 21, again from Loomes, Hollinsone Alexander Liverpool, c1790-1809. Watch number 5953 In the book it was brought in on the 3.22.1819. Under the name Jas. Hollinsone, Liverpool

    I think this is a case where spelling enters this story, plus the way Hollinsone spoke his own name. Was it sometime James Hollisone or did he say Alexander Hollisone ?

    I think, myself that we are looking at James, Alexander, Hollisone-but I intend to look further into this maker, he crops up quite often in "The Book".

    On the dial plate, you can see a repairers name Clark, Feby. 1821. Makes me wonder was Clark in America?


    Allan.

    e-32.JPG e-31.JPG
     
  23. Allan C. Purcell

    Allan C. Purcell Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Feb 9, 2013
    1,883
    418
    83
    Male
    retired
    Germany
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    #23 Allan C. Purcell, Oct 8, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2019
    Well, I returned to the source, and in the book above, post 9, I found 24 Hollison´s that need to be sorted out. Most of them I can say were those of Alex.or William Hollinsone of Liverpool, though they are all not signed the same. Answer to that is, go back further and look at the original letters, my next job. In the 24 at the moment I have found Chas. Hollison London, E.H. Hollison London, Jas. Hollison Liverpool, William Hollinsone Liverpool, and so on. Some of these could well be relatives, and not all have been found in "Loomes" so a wider search will be required.
    One clue came to light when looking at the numbers of William Hollinson of London, and Alexander Hollinson of Liverpool.

    William´s numbers. 1675,13675,15325,15348, 15387, 15440,15675,15666, 15820.15952,15990. (Date given by Loomes c1800)

    Alexander´s number. 334,352,394,456,852,1066,2913,5641,5953. (Date Given by Loomes c1790-1809)

    There are no entries in THE BOOK for Hillison´s after 1827. That points (To me) that the watches were all made long before the repair dates, and no more had been made.

    I will leave it here, and take another look at the original letters.
     
  24. Allan C. Purcell

    Allan C. Purcell Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Feb 9, 2013
    1,883
    418
    83
    Male
    retired
    Germany
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    So I have looked again at the original letters or entries in The Book, and the above 20 between William Hollison of London and Alexander Hollison of Liverpool are as said.

    That the leaves two by Jas. Hollison, who I think is J.A. Hollison on the above watch. (no entries in Loomes)

    Then we have E.H. Hollison (In Loomes, London no dates).

    Chas. Hollison London. Not found-could be William with the number 76403 Page 18 in The Book above post 9.

    Allan.
     
  25. John Matthews

    John Matthews Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Sep 22, 2015
    1,925
    695
    113
    Retired Systems Architect
    France
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Allan

    I have a record of a W Hollison, London verge #18666 in 1822 Birmingham pair cases by [S.P] Samuel Packwood of Coventry.

    Watches by Alex Hollison are held at the Liverpool Museum with dates from 1790 to 1807.

    John
     
  26. Allan C. Purcell

    Allan C. Purcell Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Feb 9, 2013
    1,883
    418
    83
    Male
    retired
    Germany
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
     

Share This Page