Terry & Clark 8-day Tall Clock

Discussion in 'Wood Movement Clocks' started by Tom Vaughn, May 23, 2019.

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  1. Tom Vaughn

    Tom Vaughn Registered User

    Feb 10, 2018
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    Just got this clock in for a cleaning! I haven't yet seen another 8-day Terry & Clark that was key wound, but here one is! After I received a Porter Contract factory clock back in January, I had published a few articles about it in local papers (to Plymouth CT). A couple from Southbury had contacted me about servicing their old wooden gear tall clock that their ancestors made. The clock came out of a 18th century saltbox colonial home and stayed in the family through its whole history. I had to break the bad news that the clock movement itself was not made by their ancestors, (the case certainly was [about 7 foot tall dental trim flat top case with side windows, glass bonnet door, and tombstone waist door, white pine, grain painted to resemble cherry or mahogany]), They were happy to know they had something much more historically significant. This clock has all of Terry's early characteristics... The back plate is dovetailed into the seatboard, the calendar mechanism (check out that spring to move the calendar lever back in place!), the count wheel moved to the front plate, etc. Some of the strike side parts are cast brass, and resemble parts from 8-day brass tall clock movements which Terry was still producing in small numbers at this time.
    This clock seriously looks like it has never been touched before at all. All of the wooden pins are original. There are no hack-job bushings and tooth repairs. The clock has no broken teeth, or any other visible damage other than some retouched paint on the dial. This thing probably hasn't run in over 100 years. It also retains its original pendulum rod, hand cast pulleys, and massive tin can weights. The hands also are pristine. It even retains the original winding crank. The only thing it is missing is the pendulum bob itself, unfortunately.
    On the rear of the dial, carved into the top is the number "26". Undoubtedly a product of Terry & Clark at Terry's Niagara Brook factory behind his home in Plymouth Center, the clock is in extraordinary condition.

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  2. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    Jun 14, 2008
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    It is indeed wonderful to find a pretty rare movement and dial in such original condition. Very uncommon in woodworks, everybody had a go at most of them and most repairs tend to have been less than sympathetic. I have had or owned a couple hundred or more woodworks clocks and only on one occasion have I had a movement that appeared to have never been "serviced". What does the cordage on this one appear to be? Just out of curiosity, I have been studying gut/cords/cables for a bit, so yours being pretty much untouched suggests original cordage?
     
  3. Tom Vaughn

    Tom Vaughn Registered User

    Feb 10, 2018
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    Jim, first, I wanted to thank you for your book! It's outstanding and I can't thank you enough for sharing your work, and an excellent resource! My summer has been terribly busy and I cant believe Nationals was already a few months ago...
    This clock had gut strings. I was able to save a small piece of it, and once I get the measurements of the thickness I will let you know. The remainder of the cords were sent back with the clock. The family wants to keep as much of the original clock pieces together with the clock. (The only other parts that were replaced were the wooden pins which went through the posts. They practically disintegrated once carefully removed, and the ones which were intact, I feared would break when the clock is operating.) Other than this clock, I have been saving all of the old cords from clock repair jobs in the past. I figured one day someone will figure out which ones are originals... The most common I've found were that old green braided thread. I find it quite frequently and question if those were more of an early 20th century repair job.
     
  4. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    Jun 14, 2008
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    We have been discussing gut, brass wire, and cord in another thread. I found a woodworks clock recently, 8 day. with some very old green cord. The discussion on this and gut can be found at GUT, How long will it last ?????? And here is a comparison of gut and the green cable. But, given your findings to date, I may want to proceed a bit more cautiously with what I have? I am under the opinion that a fair number of clocks started life with gut, mostly those with 8 day mechanisms due to the weights involved and the issues with fiber cords. But, I could be wrong on that point on many clocks.

    And thanks for the good words on my book. A lot of work to say the very least. Enjoy!

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