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Tension Washer for Hands

ImPondering

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Jul 12, 2013
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How much tension is proper for the hands? I know it has to be enough to stop the hands from slipping, but is too much going to possibly stall out a low powered regulator? Is the proper tension somewhere in between? I ask because the tapered pin for the hands fell out on a mini-Vienna. When I put it in tighter, the clock seemed to stall. I think I found a happy medium.
 

Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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You want it to have a good even 'feel' when you turn the hands.

Unless there is something wrong with the friction part of the motion works, hand-shaft length, etc., the operation of the clock should be the same whether the friction be heavy or light. Both hands should have end shake/play at all times.

Friction clutch to heavy and you can break the hand when setting, to light and there can be hand slippage, causing the clock to appear to stop or loose big chunks of time. This later problem can be hard to detect. It may happen sometimes and not others.

A close-up picture of your movement will help us determine the nature of your problem.

Willie X
 

Scottie-TX

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Apr 6, 2004
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Think this thru JP; we're pinning the minute hand to the centershaft. Once pinned is an integral part of it - an extension, no less
So; So then how could forcing the taper in further have ANY effect on the going workis?
I make tension washers from small clock mainsprings - anneal it, cut it, shape it, then retemper it.
If increased tension stops clock it's because minute hand is pressing against hour hand. To relieve, either push down hour hand a little further if possible and if not possible, put a spacer beneath minute hand and make certain IT does not interfere with hour hand.
How much tension? As you WILLIE suggested - enough to comfortably move hand with assurance it will not slip in operation.
 
Last edited:

shutterbug

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So, the gist of the counsel is this: The tension of the hand has almost no effect on the clocks function. It's entirely a function of the human interface. :)
 

Willie X

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I'm with Scottie.

No end play ... got something wrong with it. No exceptions.

No, no, no, wait. I saw a one hand wood works once that was made with an adjustable clutch on the hand. It truly did matter how tight the hand was on that one. Never say never! Especially about clocks. :)

Willie X
 

Willie X

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No, no, no, no, wait again. That example I gave in post #6 was NO exception. That clock movement still had end play on the hand shaft and it didn't matter whether the hand nut was loose or tight. The tightness of the nut had zero effect on how the clock ran. Actually this old clock's single hour hand was a very pure example of how hand clutches work.

I just get a little nervous when I see, or write, the words "never' and "always". :)

Willie X
 

ImPondering

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Jul 12, 2013
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Thanks guys for the input, helps me to better understand. I had adjusted the wall stabilizers which tilted the movement. The weight cord had bundled toward the front of the drum, causing it to stop half way through the unwind. Ticking and tocking again!
 

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