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Tall Clock

mauriciodiaz

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Dec 1, 2014
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I am trying to figure out how old this clock is. My research dates it to Circa 1754-1805 and is supposed to resemble a Kentuckian clock but not sure. The name on the movement says Osborne manufactory. Clock was being thrown away at he Rockefeller building in New York City. We literally got it out of a dumpster. I fixed the clock and it has been working flawlessly for the past four years. Any comment on value of the clock and history would be appreciated.
 

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mauriciodiaz

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Dec 1, 2014
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Oh ok... first time on this site. I didn't pay for it, saved it from being destroyed. The weight wires were all mangled in the gears. It took me a while but got it all sorted out and got it working. the only thing is the hourly chime is about 10 minutes behind. Meaning it chimes at 50 minutes instead of the top of the hour.
 

harold bain

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Welcome to the message board, Mauriciodiaz. The name Osborne on the dial falseplate tells us it was made in England, but only identifies the foundry that cast the part. Lacking a name on the dial, there isn't really anything to go on to identify the clock maker who put it together, but I suspect British origins. Your timing issues can be fixed by making adjustments behind the dial, of the gears that advance the hands.
 

mauriciodiaz

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Thank you for the Info, are there any other markings on the clock itself that I can look at. Where would they be located?
 

Jeremy Woodoff

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Sometimes the maker's name and place were on the dial but get rubbed off in cleaning. Look carefully below the calendar or above and to either side of the winding holes. Looking from the edge of the dial with a glancing light source might help, as can ultraviolet light. In this period, the maker's name on the dial would likely be the person who cased and sold the clock and possibly did a certain amount of finishing work to components (dial, movement, etc.) that were bought in from other sources. The Rockefellers didn't become rich by throwing out antiques!
 

mauriciodiaz

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Jeremy, thank you for the information. The clock probably belonged to someone living in the Rockefeller building in New York. A storage facility was being cleaned and that's how I came across the clock. It was actually in the dumpster already. Luckily they did just throw it in.
 

Jeremy Woodoff

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Oh, is that the Rockefeller Apartments? Wouldn't have been a Rockefeller, then. But still, to just throw away an antique grandfather clock!
 

Dick C

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Oct 14, 2009
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If you have a chance how about providing photos of the following:

The front of the clock, top to bottom so we can see the feet and the door when it is closed.

The side of the top (the bonnet)

The complete brass works from the side.
 

jmclaugh

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Jun 1, 2006
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Painted dials only came into use on longcase clocks from around 1770. I assume Osborne is marked on the dial or a falseplate because afaik the firm didn't make movements, the firm are said to have been in business trading as Osborne from 1777 to 1813. The clock might be American as painted dails were imported to the US from England.

As a rule British longcase clocks are rarely marked on the movement and the maker's name is usually on the dial face.