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Tall case on carpet

gordon

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Mar 7, 2007
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Hello All

What are some things that can be done to stabilize a tall case clock on carpet? Heavy carpet and pad.

I have a Scottish tall case from the 1800's that was purchased after we put new carpet and pad on the floor. The clock shows best on the carpet.
The clock is about 7'- 6". It offen stops when the weights reaches the pendulum bob.


Gordon
 

c.kugle

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Jul 15, 2021
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Hello All

What are some things that can be done to stabilize a tall case clock on carpet? Heavy carpet and pad.

I have a Scottish tall case from the 1800's that was purchased after we put new carpet and pad on the floor. The clock shows best on the carpet.
The clock is about 7'- 6". It offen stops when the weights reaches the pendulum bob.


Gordon
Just an idea but you could make a nice decorative platform of matching wood to your clock with adjustable feet as levelers.
 

novicetimekeeper

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We just cut a hole in the carpet.

However that may not be a solution for you. Quality loud speakers usually have spikes that go through the carpet to the floor.

You could try a board on the carpet and stand the clock on that, the other question is have you fixed the clock to the wall? That is how English longcase were designed to work, if you have not done that then the carpet isn't the major part of the problem.
 

Mike Phelan

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Dec 17, 2003
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Hello All

What are some things that can be done to stabilize a tall case clock on carpet? Heavy carpet and pad.

I have a Scottish tall case from the 1800's that was purchased after we put new carpet and pad on the floor. The clock shows best on the carpet.
The clock is about 7'- 6". It offen stops when the weights reaches the pendulum bob.


Gordon
On our longcase I have a wooden batten screwed to the wall at about dial height; the clock is on a carpeted floor and resting against the batten; i have two small wood wedges (actually half clothespegs!) pushed against the base of the clock on the carpet so it rests firmly on the batten. A bit of a fiddle so the clock is vertical in both directions.
 
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ToddT

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Maybe a combination of the wood platform where the platform has spikes that go through the carpet to the subfloor. Plus the batten to secure it to the wall.
 

bwclock

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Maybe a combination of the wood platform where the platform has spikes that go through the carpet to the subfloor. Plus the batten to secure it to the wall.
I tape a piece of wood to the back of the clock near the top of the case and then put shims under the front, thus pressing the clock against the piece of wood at the top. This works fine on two old English longcase clocks with standard bobs as well as a regulator with a nine pound bob(guessing on the weight) I have on carpet here. I have done so with customers' clocks for years and have had no complaints.

This is similar in function to what Mike Phelan does without having to drill into the wall. Most, if not all, of the older clocks already have holes in the backboards, perhaps to stabilize the clocks. Using an existing hole(s) and screwing the clock to the wall is done by some and has the added advantage of keeping the clock from falling over on Grannie or some mischievous kid, should either play with it.
Bruce
 
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gmorse

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Hi Chris,
A clock by Daniel Quare from the John C. Taylor collection. Note the case feet.
As you'd expect, it's far more impressive to see it close up; I was lucky enough to see this when it was in the selling exhibition in Winchester, along with some other amazing pieces.

Regards,

Graham
 

Mike Phelan

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Most, if not all, of the older clocks already have holes in the backboards, perhaps to stabilize the clocks. Using an existing hole(s) and screwing the clock to the wall is done by some and has the added advantage of keeping the clock from falling over on Grannie or some mischievous kid, should either play with it.
Bruce
Mine has a few hoes in its backboard, but cannot use it as our longcase is on a corner of the room so the batten is triangular. Thankfully, no grannies, kids or customers here!
 

Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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Install stickers (about 5/8" long) on the front feet and screw the case to the wall using a spacer/batten of just the right thickness. What Mike and others are saying.

You wont necessarily need the screw/s into the wall if the stickers are just the right length and the batten is the correct thickness. Similar to what Bruce has mentioned.

Setting the clock on a board is not a good approach. The board will show and rock around worse than the clock setting on its feet. Big screws through the carpet might help but (in general) this is not something the customer is going to like.

Mike, you be careful around those 'hoes' now!

Willie X
 
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gordon

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Mar 7, 2007
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Hello All

Thank you for all the ideas. I am liking the batten or block of wood to eliminate the sympathetic-vibration. Even though the clock is in the corner I can make a triangle bracket that will be attached to the 2 corner walls. then use a batten or block to have the clock lean up against the corner bracket.

It will be a little work but its for me in my home. If I had to pay for that work ouch.

I might have cut the old carpet to stabilize the clock but not the new carpet. My wife would have me and the clock out on the street.

I did think about a board with spikes the clock could sit on. But the 7' 6" clock towers in the 8' ceiling now.

I have known about tall case suffering from sympathetic-vibration for a while. Never saw it out side a rickety test stand until now.

Thank you for all the good ideas.

Gordon Webb
 
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Rockin Ronnie

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The issue of sympathetic vibration concerns me as well. My 1848 Scottish clock is on a hardwood floor and still stops when the weights are the same height as the pendulum. I have a wire stabilizer attached to a wall hook but it seems I must do more to stop the vibrations. Good thread.

Ron
 

novicetimekeeper

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The issue of sympathetic vibration concerns me as well. My 1848 Scottish clock is on a hardwood floor and still stops when the weights are the same height as the pendulum. I have a wire stabilizer attached to a wall hook but it seems I must do more to stop the vibrations. Good thread.

Ron
That doesn't sound rigid enough. They were designed to be fixed to the wall. Look in the back of one that is 300 years old, looks like it has been used for target practice. You can usually find a hole you can use but a new one won't be a problem either.
 
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roughbarked

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That doesn't sound rigid enough. They were designed to be fixed to the wall. Look in the back of one that is 300 years old, looks like it has been used for target practice. You can usually find a hole you can use but a new one won't be a problem either.
I copied my wall bracket from old American wall clocks. Attach any bracket to the back of the clock. Top or bottom depending upon which clock you want to stay as straight as your wall does. Screw this to the wall stud so that you can move it if the floor moves.. ad infinitum...
 

wspohn

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I have played around with this a bit. As a dedicated home audio hobbyist, spiking speakers to the floor is de rigeur, but the only way I can think of to do it non-destructively for a long case clock would be to get a sheet of reasonably heavy sheet gauge steel a tad larger than the base of the clock and braze or weld nuts over holes drilled just outside of the clock base dimensions and install spikes from an audio source that couple it to the floor.

Frankly, the easiest way is to just screw it to the wall half way down the case. A lot of long case clocks have quite a few holes in the back board from this and it works. I had problems with a 30 day clock stopping on me and tried other solutions but the advice from members here was to simply screw it to the wall and that solved it. By all means use a batten that fills the space between the back and the wall. BTW, it usually stopped around the time the weights reached the same level as the pendulum bob.
 

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