Tall case clock with wooden movement

psarafan

New Member
Jan 3, 2021
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I acquired this tall case clock via Craigs List after having to compose, for the seller, an essay explaining why I deserved to have it and what my plans for it would me. Five years later, I have finally dusted it off and, in looking online for information, discovered this website. It appears to be mostly intact but clearly not working condition. I do not feel remotely qualified and have not done any restoration work on it. It came with no history or information. I am hoping that some members may be able to give me some insights into its history, age, maker etc. Please let me know if any additional pictures would be helpful. Thanks. Peter S. P1060633.JPG P1060634.JPG P1060635.JPG P1060636.JPG P1060643.JPG P1060644.JPG P1060645.JPG P1060650.JPG P1060654.JPG P1060659.JPG P1060662.JPG P1060663.JPG P1060664.JPG
 

Tom Vaughn

Registered User
Feb 10, 2018
75
35
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This clock falls under the Waterbury Connecticut style mechanism, however given some characteristics of the movement, I would place its origins in Ohio. Ohio makers tended to have these two post movements with more elaborately turned pinions. I would place a date on this clock ranging from 1820-1830. The winding barrel on the time side appears to have a separator in the middle (?)... if so this unusual feature may assist in identifying it.
The dial has unfortunately been repainted, the original probably bearing the makers name.
The movement looks good and intact, although the bell is a poor replacement. There should be little difficulty getting it up and running after a thorough cleaning and a few new bushings (although it looks to have had some bushings redone [surprisingly rather properly] long ago). It would have originally had tin-can weights but has since inherited shelf clock weights which may work for now. It appears that none of the additional articles/parts pictured are likely original to this clock.
It would have probably had "Bristol-type" diamond hands originally, or Riley Whiting "Umbrella" hands, both styles were cast in pewter or lead. They are available on Ebay or from private shops.
Nice clock!
 

psarafan

New Member
Jan 3, 2021
2
0
1
73
Country
This clock falls under the Waterbury Connecticut style mechanism, however given some characteristics of the movement, I would place its origins in Ohio. Ohio makers tended to have these two post movements with more elaborately turned pinions. I would place a date on this clock ranging from 1820-1830. The winding barrel on the time side appears to have a separator in the middle (?)... if so this unusual feature may assist in identifying it.
The dial has unfortunately been repainted, the original probably bearing the makers name.
The movement looks good and intact, although the bell is a poor replacement. There should be little difficulty getting it up and running after a thorough cleaning and a few new bushings (although it looks to have had some bushings redone [surprisingly rather properly] long ago). It would have originally had tin-can weights but has since inherited shelf clock weights which may work for now. It appears that none of the additional articles/parts pictured are likely original to this clock.
It would have probably had "Bristol-type" diamond hands originally, or Riley Whiting "Umbrella" hands, both styles were cast in pewter or lead. They are available on Ebay or from private shops.
Nice clock!
Tom, thank you so much for your input. I appreciate it.
 

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