Synchron Electric movement adjustment?

Discussion in 'Electric Horology' started by Floyd's Grandson, Apr 5, 2020.

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  1. Floyd's Grandson

    Floyd's Grandson Registered User
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    Mar 16, 2020
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    I recently acquired a mini grandfather clock with a “Synchron” electric movement. It works fine, but it loses about 10 minutes in a 24 hour period. I’m wondering if there’s a way to adjust the speed of this movement.

    It has a pendulum that is not adjustable. I’m guessing it’s more for aesthetics than having anything to do with the “beat” of the clock. It hangs from a swinging arm attached to the movement.

    Thanks in advance for any input!

    3273BD42-5D64-4A2D-9DA1-9CAF708C207F.jpeg C27471CE-C84D-4E21-8A8B-F72A0CD32132.jpeg 9440E3AD-4ADA-4FFE-9320-1C53DB4A55B0.jpeg BD5493C7-41F3-4A48-917B-CC2D325469F2.jpeg E2D0DE1E-9587-4533-B5BC-52E1A1D2F33E.jpeg 52DD76A6-08BC-4D86-84D5-DD1FBDC42902.jpeg DCE08BE5-E600-42C7-9E79-D894545E39BB.jpeg
     
  2. JTD

    JTD Registered User

    Sep 27, 2005
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    This might do better in the Electric Horology section.

    A moderator can move it for you if he agrees.

    JTD
     
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  3. Floyd's Grandson

    Floyd's Grandson Registered User
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    Mar 16, 2020
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    I also have a couple other questions about this clock.

    1.) As can be seen in the photo of the chime block, there is a thin piece of wood mounted to the inside of the case. Any ideas what the purpose is?

    2.) There’s also a small nail tacked inside the same side of the case, also visible in the pictures. Any ideas what the purpose of that is? It is identical to two nails that are inside the opposite side of the case which hold the electrical cord in place and out of view.
     
  4. mxfrank

    mxfrank Registered User

    Oct 27, 2011
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    Where did the clock come from? Synchronous motors are dependent on the line frequency for regulation. House current in the US is 120v 60Hz. There should be a specification somewhere on the motor which gives this information, probably along the side as in the photo. If the motor frequency is not correct for your line current, the clock won't keep time.

    I suppose it may be possible for the clock to be slowed by poor lubrication or worn bushings. The motor is permanently oiled. Although it's possible to replace the lubricant, the expedient solution is to just find a replacement. They're pretty common.

    techron.jpg
     
  5. Floyd's Grandson

    Floyd's Grandson Registered User
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    It was my grandfather’s. I’m not sure where it came from originally, but the motor is stamped with “Model 610 110 V 60 C Y 3 W 1 RPM”. It is also marked “H44R 12 55”. Since the inspection tag is dated 4/23/59, I’m guessing it’s safe to assume the 12 55 is the date the motor was manufactured.

    I was just wondering if the pendulum might have something to do with the pace of the clock. Peculiarly, the pendulum swings and then almost comes to a stop intermittently; But I’ve watched the second hand when this happens and it doesn’t seem to affect that part. The arm that the pendulum hangs from has a brass piece on the end with a set screw. I’ve moved it on the arm to see if that affected the speed of the clock, but it did not seem to make a difference. I’m still curious why that particular piece is adjustable.
     
  6. davefr

    davefr Registered User
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    Nov 29, 2008
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    At 70 years old, that motor is well past it's expected lifetime. You're lucky because they're still readily available new and pretty inexpensive. Replace the motor before you do anything else.
     
  7. Gary Myers

    Gary Myers Registered User
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    Oct 14, 2015
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  8. Clock Nut

    Clock Nut Registered User
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    Mar 7, 2014
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    The pendulum is only decorative. It doesn’t effect the timing or function of the clock in any way. It’s typical for them to be a little jerky on these clocks when they swing. Not keeping good time is usually due to the gearing on an electric clock. Perhaps the motor was replaced at one time with another one with fewer teeth on the drive pinion
     

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